Jump to content
pzabbythesecond

Judgeship - if you aren't a litigator, is it still possible?

Recommended Posts

4 minutes ago, TrqTTs said:

They don't prep for cases like you or the Crown do though, they literally show up on a case by case basis to see what they're dealing with at hand.  Maybe it depends on the court (all provincial courts here) and the judge I am most familiar with is nearing retirement, but this individual definitely enjoys the quantity and quality of vacation days and it does not seem to be anything new.

Well especially in superior or appellate courts, they do have to read motion materials, casebooks, Charter arguments etc before court, which can be a lot of material.There is less of that in provincial court for sure. They also have to research and write judgments after. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

What was that quote in Letters to a Young Lawyer by Alan Dershowitz?  Something along the lines of a defense attorney calls their client excitedly and tells them "Justice has prevailed! "  The client responds, "Appeal, immediately!"

Edited by TrqTTs
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They also have to research and write judgments after.



Or look over what their clerks have done. ;) I thought you did a clerkship, you should know that!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I know that as a defence lawyer I have definitely been filing more stuff and been asked to file more stuff over the past couple of  years and add to that the pressure and timelines of Jordan and I think all of us in the criminal justice system, judges included, are working harder, have more paperwork, and are more stressed.

Edited by providence

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, erinl2 said:



Or look over what their clerks have done. ;) I thought you did a clerkship, you should know that!

Well that’s included in “writing” a judgment of course!:)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/16/2018 at 8:09 AM, TrqTTs said:

This particular judge had quite a bit of soliciting experience themselves in private practice prior to joining the crown's office, and subsequently getting called to the bench.  So though soliciting experience is not a detriment of course, some litigation experience (on either or preferably both sides of criminal) along with continuing legal education and community involvement seem more or less crucial to making it.

 

Teehee.

Bedford has changed my interpretation of this word forever.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only lawyers I know who have soliciting experience are litigators fwiw

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



  • Recent Posts

    • Greetings everyone, I completed my Bachelors degree from India last year, And I have a 3.7 GPA With 170 LSAT Score. My Ambition is to work as a Lawyer in Canada, But I'm really afraid to apply as I don't know about the job prospects for International Students in Canada.  I know how risky it is, To come to Canada on a student visa, And expect a job after three years on a post graduation work permit. So is it worth applying, as an international student?
    • It seems to be a recent phenomenon where getting approved without a cosigner with no credit history is the norm. Is it a fairly safe assumption that not much is going to change between now and this time next year? Probably. But why chance it? It's not hard to get a good credit score. If you open a basic student credit card account and make minimum payments on time for a year or so you'll probably have a score of around 700~. You have to be late an entire 30 days before a late payment is reported on your credit report (though banks may increase your interest rate if you're consistently late). You don't even really have to worry about paying off the balance in full each month--though it is good advice to help avoid overspending--as long as you pay down the balance to lower your utilization around a month or so before you apply for credit, as far as your credit score is concerned you're in the exact same position as a person who paid the card off in full each month. If you get a card from your current bank, you can link your credit card and debit card with online banking. Meaning you log into online banking and you'll see both accounts. You can see your credit card minimum payment and due date and transfer whatever amount you want from your debit account to your credit card to make a payment. It only takes a few seconds. Most banks even have features where they will text or email you notice that you have a payment coming up. There's really no hassle at all, it's not much more than a 30 second commitment once a month. As far as rent goes, rent generally doesn't show up on your credit report unless you were missing payments and your landlord took you to the tenancy board and got a judgement against you. Cell phone bills are reported on your credit report, but they don't really help to establish credit--they mostly just hurt you if you miss payments. Utilities like cable/internet/house phone won't show up unless they go to collections. Some cities will also send things like unpaid parking tickets to a collection agency too. Not having a credit card doesn't necessarily mean you have no credit. My girlfriend did a number on her credit score by making a bunch of late cellphone payments during undergrad for example If you want to verify whether you have (or don't have) a credit history you can get a free credit check from Borrowell (Equifax score) or CreditKarma (a Transunion based score). Borrowell updates your score automatically once a month and CreditKarma does it weekly. They're VERY useful.  
    • Waitlisted on May 10. LSAT: 154 Cgpa: 77% (UBC) and 3.01 (OLSAS calculated) due to a bad first year. L2: 88% and L3: 85% (UBC) Excellent EC's and work experience. I'm assuming references were strong.
    • Accepted about a week ago. LSAT: 154 Cgpa: 77% (UBC) and 3.01 (OLSAS calculated) due to a bad first year. L2: 88% and L3: 85% (UBC) Excellent EC's and work experience. I'm assuming references were strong.
    • Congrats! Double congrats for u! Did you get an email or check on website?
×