Jump to content
KhalilMack

Chances: OLSAS cGPA: 3.28, B3: 3.5

Recommended Posts

Hello All!

I was just hoping to get some feedback regarding my chances for admission at UofT law for this coming admissions cycle. I completed my undergraduate education at the University of Toronto in Chemical Engineering. I know UofT takes a holistic approach to applications, and I'm not sure if my extracurriculars are considered weak or strong (or somewhere in between), so I'm just going to provide some background on myself and let you guys provide your wonderful feedback!

-As I've said, my OLSAS cGPA is 3.28, and my best three years yield a 3.5 (OLSAS). My last 2 years yield a GPA of 2.97 (OLSAS). I had a really awful third year, which I can explain with medical reasoning.
-I studied Chemical Engineering at the University of Toronto (I've heard that UofT takes program difficulty into consideration, but I obviously have no confirmation as to whether or not this is true).
-I did a Professional Experience Year (PEY) at IBM for 16 months where I worked as an analyst. I worked with a tonne of clients.
-I did a summer of work as a Research Intern for a professor in the faculty and won a research competition.
-I was very involved with my student government in 2nd and 3rd year. I was a director on my student's union's board of directors and was the Chief Returning Officer of the Engineering Society for a year. I was also involved with the Policy and Procedures committees for both my student's union and the Engineering Society at my school (this is actually what made me realize I might want to be a lawyer!)
-I was the Vice-President of Finance and Chair of a small club focused on BioEngineering and connecting students with that field.
-I helped lead orientation week in a minor capacity.
-I played a variety of intramural sports throughout my undergrad.
-I am currently working as a service representative for a chemical company where I deal with many clients and consult them on their chemical processes. 

I know this is probably an overload of information, and thank you for reading it all. I am just wondering:
-What kind of LSAT score would I need to be a competitive applicant?
-Would my extracurriculars (or "softs" as I have often heard them referred to) be considered strong or weak, or in the middle?

-Are there any other law schools for which I would be a competitive applicant?


Again, any feedback is greatly appreciated! Have a great one.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, KhalilMack said:

Hello All!

I was just hoping to get some feedback regarding my chances for admission at UofT law for this coming admissions cycle. I completed my undergraduate education at the University of Toronto in Chemical Engineering. I know UofT takes a holistic approach to applications, and I'm not sure if my extracurriculars are considered weak or strong (or somewhere in between), so I'm just going to provide some background on myself and let you guys provide your wonderful feedback!

-As I've said, my OLSAS cGPA is 3.28, and my best three years yield a 3.5 (OLSAS). My last 2 years yield a GPA of 2.97 (OLSAS). I had a really awful third year, which I can explain with medical reasoning.
-I studied Chemical Engineering at the University of Toronto (I've heard that UofT takes program difficulty into consideration, but I obviously have no confirmation as to whether or not this is true).
-I did a Professional Experience Year (PEY) at IBM for 16 months where I worked as an analyst. I worked with a tonne of clients.
-I did a summer of work as a Research Intern for a professor in the faculty and won a research competition.
-I was very involved with my student government in 2nd and 3rd year. I was a director on my student's union's board of directors and was the Chief Returning Officer of the Engineering Society for a year. I was also involved with the Policy and Procedures committees for both my student's union and the Engineering Society at my school (this is actually what made me realize I might want to be a lawyer!)
-I was the Vice-President of Finance and Chair of a small club focused on BioEngineering and connecting students with that field.
-I helped lead orientation week in a minor capacity.
-I played a variety of intramural sports throughout my undergrad.
-I am currently working as a service representative for a chemical company where I deal with many clients and consult them on their chemical processes. 

I know this is probably an overload of information, and thank you for reading it all. I am just wondering:
-What kind of LSAT score would I need to be a competitive applicant?
-Would my extracurriculars (or "softs" as I have often heard them referred to) be considered strong or weak, or in the middle?

-Are there any other law schools for which I would be a competitive applicant?


Again, any feedback is greatly appreciated! Have a great one.

 

170’s and a killer personal statement should do the trick. 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

U of T takes your best 3 years and LSAT. Go look at their class profile for an indication of where you stand.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

U of T is holistic only insofar that PS is considered as 1/3 of your application, with the GPA and LSAT each being another 1/3. I would say you have very robust extracurriculars and can write a compelling personal statement. 

GPA is tough. 3.5 B3 isn't bad but it's seriously below the 3.8 median at U of T. You will have to use the LSAT to get a leg up. Ideally 170 at the very minimum to be remotely safe. 

And they do consider program difficulty. But the extent to which they do is a mystery. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, KhalilMack said:

What kind of LSAT score would I need to be a competitive applicant?

A very high one. ECs don't really matter, and in any case many, if not most, students applying to law school will have similar ECs.

Your GPA isn't great, but you were in a difficult program, and I find it hard to believe that law schools don't somehow take that into consideration . Also, upward trends in grades are good, and some schools accept your best two years. So that all of that muddies the water a bit with respect to predictions.

But before we worry about where you would be competitive for admissions, get an LSAT score and then things will become much more clear.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Engineering programs tend to get a bit of a boost because they are seen as being more competitive in undergrad. No idea about U of T chemical engineering specifically. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/12/2018 at 4:29 PM, Ambit said:

Engineering programs tend to get a bit of a boost because they are seen as being more competitive in undergrad

And what do you base this on?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, pzabbythesecond said:

And what do you base this on?

My understanding is that the algorithm compares like to like to some extent- so if engineers tend to have lower GPAs as a whole, you can get further with a lower GPA from an engineering program. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Otter248 said:

My understanding is that the algorithm compares like to like to some extent- so if engineers tend to have lower GPAs as a whole, you can get further with a lower GPA from an engineering program. 

I get how it works. He made the claim that engineering students get a boost. I asked him where he got that information from.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is not a good idea to rely on softs (i.e. EC's, program difficulty etc.) when applying to law schools. As somebody mentioned above, U of T is essentially 1/3 LSAT, 1/3 personal statement (PS), and 1/3 GPA. Straight up, your GPA will be a problem. So you're going to need to compensate for that by doing a good job with the remaining 2/3 of your application.

I would aim for 170+ on the LSAT and put a lot of thought into your PS. 

Your GPA might be a problem at Osgoode, but I think all other schools should be within reach if you land around 163-165 on the LSAT.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Comments by a professor who works on the adcom and is familiar with how u of t does its algorithm. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



  • Recent Posts

    • The notion that everyone's doing better than you is a ridiculous concern, unless you're a solid C student. It would be strange NOT to call such a concern ridiculous. And if everyone is ACTUALLY doing better than you, the problem is the fact that you're a C student, not the fact that everyone is doing better than you. And, again, that's not a ridiculous concern, it's one that has to be taken seriously.  
    • And worth saying that law students are PRIVILEGED. Having downward spirals over getting some Bs is NOTHING compared to having them over much more serious and damaging issues. One thing that keeps me from spiralling is remembering how lucky I am, how much worse it can be and how much better off I am than so many other people despite whatever problems I’m having.
    • Ok, but I can fall into downward spirals really easily, too. I don’t have a label for why that is but I know I’ve been that way almost as long as I can remember. But it isn’t anyone else’s fault or anyone else’s responsibility to get me out, though I appreciate the love and support of those who can and do. My meltdowns are my issue that I have learned to deal with as best as I can. I can’t control what other people do and say.
    • More seriously, people are not entitled to uncritical reinforcement of their self-esteem.  No doubt it would make them feel better if they were, but they aren't entitled to that.  If I want to wear fishnet stockings, great for me, but I'm not entitled to validation from others.  
    • I went to the one in Feb but I brought both my parents with. A lot of other people did as well. 
×