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LawSchoolHopeful2017

Transferring to the U of A, experiences?

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Hey! So, due to some personal circumstances, I will be applying to transfer to the u of a for 2L. I was just wondering if anyone has any experience with that, how competitive it is, how much they look at compassionate reasons? I just want to get an idea of my chances. Thank you!

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I'm looking to transfer too. Any idea when the applications would be finished and offers given?

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On 2018-03-26 at 10:50 AM, LawSchoolHopeful2017 said:

Hey! So, due to some personal circumstances, I will be applying to transfer to the u of a for 2L. I was just wondering if anyone has any experience with that, how competitive it is, how much they look at compassionate reasons? I just want to get an idea of my chances. Thank you!

 

On 2018-05-15 at 12:35 PM, yoelle said:

I'm looking to transfer too. Any idea when the applications would be finished and offers given?

what are your final 1L grades?

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On 2018-05-15 at 12:35 PM, yoelle said:

I'm looking to transfer too. Any idea when the applications would be finished and offers given?

I’ve heard second week of June for the earliest date of offers. 

On 2018-05-18 at 9:36 PM, Callsaul said:

 

what are your final 1L grades?

I had 2 C’s and 3 C+’s which is far from great but keep in mind that sask curves at a C+/B-

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On 2018-05-20 at 1:28 AM, LawSchoolHopeful2017 said:

I’ve heard second week of June for the earliest date of offers. 

I had 2 C’s and 3 C+’s which is far from great but keep in mind that sask curves at a C+/B-

 

On 2018-05-22 at 1:56 PM, yoelle said:

I had A, B+, B, B, C+ for 3.21 curve I think is a 3 or there abouts

I believe you need a b+ average and then the personal statement is considered. Could be wrong tho 

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16 hours ago, Callsaul said:

 

I believe you need a b+ average and then the personal statement is considered. Could be wrong tho 

The minimum average you need to apply is a 65% or 2.0 average. If by "need" you mean B+ and up is the competitive average, I would guess that is quite unlikely. When I talked to the admissions officer in November, she said that there are 10-15 spots available every year and 25-30 applicants. And to be honest i would guess that her numbers for applicants are inflated. so more likely you get 20-25 applicants for 10-15 spots, worst case thats 40% odds. i find it difficult to believe that 4/10 of the people who applied had a B+ or better average, considering that is a small percentage of law students across canada. Also, the admissions officer didnt say this, but my understanding was that reason for return was also big in their acceptance, so im not sure how they would be able to balance that if they needed a B+ minimum.  

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4 hours ago, LawSchoolHopeful2017 said:

The minimum average you need to apply is a 65% or 2.0 average. If by "need" you mean B+ and up is the competitive average, I would guess that is quite unlikely. When I talked to the admissions officer in November, she said that there are 10-15 spots available every year and 25-30 applicants. And to be honest i would guess that her numbers for applicants are inflated. so more likely you get 20-25 applicants for 10-15 spots, worst case thats 40% odds. i find it difficult to believe that 4/10 of the people who applied had a B+ or better average, considering that is a small percentage of law students across canada. Also, the admissions officer didnt say this, but my understanding was that reason for return was also big in their acceptance, so im not sure how they would be able to balance that if they needed a B+ minimum.  

No one here will likely know for sure. What I remember in 1L at the U of A is that a B average was often a dividing line for many things: for OCI chances, for student exchanges, for some opportunities to work with professors. I suspect, but don't know for sure, that a B average is also what you'd want for a good chance at transferring. Keep in mind, the U of A curves to a B-/B in 1L.

If you have a B average (or whatever Sask curves at, which seems like a B-) you are a little ahead of the curve and are one of the better students. If you are lower than a B- (or again, a C+) then you are on the low end.

My guess, which is all you will find here, is that you have to be at least an "average" student to have a reasonable chance to transfer or have very compelling circumstances (think dying parent or extreme family emergency). I sympathize with lower 1L grades; law school is tough and everyone is learning how to write a law exam.

That said, your grades are likely not competitive to transfer to the U of A. You probably will need a more compelling reason to transfer than most. It's not impossible; maybe it's not a competitive transfer year or maybe you do in fact have a very sympathetic case. But this is probably the reality you are facing.

Don't let the minimum average needed to apply fool you, either. Lower than a C (2.0) average and you get kicked out of law school at the U of A for academic failure. Being able to apply is not remotely the same thing as having a decent chance.

 

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9 hours ago, ludo said:

No one here will likely know for sure. What I remember in 1L at the U of A is that a B average was often a dividing line for many things: for OCI chances, for student exchanges, for some opportunities to work with professors. I suspect, but don't know for sure, that a B average is also what you'd want for a good chance at transferring. Keep in mind, the U of A curves to a B-/B in 1L.

If you have a B average (or whatever Sask curves at, which seems like a B-) you are a little ahead of the curve and are one of the better students. If you are lower than a B- (or again, a C+) then you are on the low end.

My guess, which is all you will find here, is that you have to be at least an "average" student to have a reasonable chance to transfer or have very compelling circumstances (think dying parent or extreme family emergency). I sympathize with lower 1L grades; law school is tough and everyone is learning how to write a law exam.

That said, your grades are likely not competitive to transfer to the U of A. You probably will need a more compelling reason to transfer than most. It's not impossible; maybe it's not a competitive transfer year or maybe you do in fact have a very sympathetic case. But this is probably the reality you are facing.

Don't let the minimum average needed to apply fool you, either. Lower than a C (2.0) average and you get kicked out of law school at the U of A for academic failure. Being able to apply is not remotely the same thing as having a decent chance.

 

I absolutely understand that and I do believe my reason for transfer is compelling. As of now I am fully prepared to return to Usask and expect that is what I will be doing. But if I get in, that would be great. I don’t think there’s a great understanding in general(here or possibly anywhere outside of the admissions committee) how the transfer process works and how competitive it really is. I do appreciate the insight though, and am hoping for the best.

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