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8 hours ago, Himalaya said:

Current 3L. Living in res would not be conducive to 1L at all. 

Thanks! Could i know why? If the undergraduate noise might be an issue, I never enjoyed studying where I lived anyway, preferring to study at libraries or community centres.

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17 hours ago, greenyellownoses said:

Thanks! Could i know why? If the undergraduate noise might be an issue, I never enjoyed studying where I lived anyway, preferring to study at libraries or community centres.

https://www.dal.ca/campus_life/residence_housing/residence/halifax-campus/costs---fees.html

Just a cursory look here shows that the cheapest meal plan + the second cheapest rent (I am making the assumption that a sane law student has zero interest in a "Bunk Double") costs just over $9,000. There is a glut of housing in Halifax for that price point and below. So the question becomes: regardless of whether you like studying at home or not, why would you choose to live in res when you have so many other options?

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On 6/3/2018 at 9:46 PM, greenyellownoses said:

Thanks for starting this thread - Do you know of any law students who live on dorms? When I did some research I found barely anything, and the bare that I did find suggested against it.

I know of one guy who did it this year and he grew to hate it pretty quickly. The overall consensus is that you should avoid it unless you really like living in dorms.

On 6/4/2018 at 5:12 AM, ebbfl said:

How is the JD/MBA program and its reputation? 

How is the legal market in Halifax?

is it easier to go back to Vancouver/Toronto after you graduate, for articling?

did students get quite a lot of scholarships in 2L and 3L?

 

 

thanks!

It's kind of hard for me to assess the JD/MBA program because I'm just doing a regular JD. Generally speaking, though, DAL's law program has a great reputation and they've got reach throughout the country. The legal market in Halifax consists of a few corporate firms and then a bunch of small to mid-sized counterparts. If you want the really big money jobs then you should probably keep your sights set on Vancouver/Toronto/etc. Just keep in mind that corporate law is often terrible for work/life balance so it's worth assessing how much of a sacrifice you're willing to make to bolster your bank account.

Schulich seems to give out a significant amount of scholarship/grant/bursary money primarily on the basis of need. Some require applications and work on your end but others you get considered for without having to do anything. I can't speak much to the experience of others, but I came into law school in a pretty good financial situation (no outstanding previous debt whatsoever, ~$10k saved) and they still decided to give me $2700 over the course of the school year. 

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Hey! I was wondering if you’d be able to share your first year schedule as I’m not sure when we’re going to be able to register. So far we’ve only been told “early August” and I’m curious as to what an example of a 1L schedule looks like! 

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7 hours ago, illyria281 said:

Hey! I was wondering if you’d be able to share your first year schedule as I’m not sure when we’re going to be able to register. So far we’ve only been told “early August” and I’m curious as to what an example of a 1L schedule looks like! 

Not sure if you saw, but someone posted their 1L schedule in the Facebook group! 

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12 hours ago, illyria281 said:

Hey! I was wondering if you’d be able to share your first year schedule as I’m not sure when we’re going to be able to register. So far we’ve only been told “early August” and I’m curious as to what an example of a 1L schedule looks like! 

August 8 

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7 hours ago, LegalArmada said:

Not sure if you saw, but someone posted their 1L schedule in the Facebook group! 

Fabulous! Thanks for the heads up! :D

 

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Posted (edited)
On 6/4/2018 at 5:58 AM, greenyellownoses said:

Thanks! Could i know why? If the undergraduate noise might be an issue, I never enjoyed studying where I lived anyway, preferring to study at libraries or community centres.

Do you enjoy vomit in the showers? Sleeping on Friday nights? Someone pounding on your door screaming: "Ronald! Rooonnnnaalllldddd! I know you're in there. Rooonnnnaaalllllddd!" Even though you just assured them that no one named Ronald was in your room..

Dal res is full of people who just finished high school and moved out of their parents' houses. They're enjoying their newfound freedom. That's fun for them. I wouldn't have enjoyed their freedom during first-year of law school. 

Edited by realpseudonym
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On 3/15/2018 at 3:56 PM, lavarius said:

The poster of the original "Ask a 1L" (realpseudonym) thread has stopped responding. I found his comments and advice rather helpful when I was going through the application process so I figured I'd try to do the same for the incoming students. I'm a 1L student currently enrolled at DAL. My grades are a mix of A's and B's (get used to getting some B's - trust me).   

Note: If you're wondering what your chances of getting accepted are, simply plug your own numbers into this formula: [GPA / 4.3 * 0.6 + (LSAT - 120) / 60 * 0.4]. If you're a Maritime resident, anything above 0.8 is considered competitive. If you're a non-Maritime resident, you want to be above 0.81.

Aside from that, ask away and I'll do my best to answer you.

If I'm using a 4.0/OLSAS GPA, should that be converted to its 4.3 equivalent before being plugged in? 

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