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The poster of the original "Ask a 1L" (realpseudonym) thread has stopped responding. I found his comments and advice rather helpful when I was going through the application process so I figured I'd try to do the same for the incoming students. I'm a 1L student currently enrolled at DAL. My grades are a mix of A's and B's (get used to getting some B's - trust me).   

Note: If you're wondering what your chances of getting accepted are, simply plug your own numbers into this formula: [GPA / 4.3 * 0.6 + (LSAT - 120) / 60 * 0.4]. If you're a Maritime resident, anything above 0.8 is considered competitive. If you're a non-Maritime resident, you want to be above 0.81.

Aside from that, ask away and I'll do my best to answer you.

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36 minutes ago, lavarius said:

The poster of the original "Ask a 1L" (realpseudonym) thread has stopped responding. I found his comments and advice rather helpful when I was going through the application process so I figured I'd try to do the same for the incoming students. I'm a 1L student currently enrolled at DAL. My grades are a mix of A's and B's (get used to getting some B's - trust me).   

Note: If you're wondering what your chances of getting accepted are, simply plug your own numbers into this formula: [GPA / 4.3 * 0.6 + (LSAT - 120) / 60 * 0.4]. If you're a Maritime resident, anything above 0.8 is considered competitive. If you're a non-Maritime resident, you want to be above 0.81.

Aside from that, ask away and I'll do my best to answer you.

Thanks a lot for doing this.

I have an index above 0.81 but still haven't heard anything yet.

Any idea?

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4 minutes ago, LawStream said:

Thanks a lot for doing this.

I have an index above 0.81 but still haven't heard anything yet.

Any idea?

I don't know if the index is necessarily official and determinative. And I'm not sure if competitive numbers necessarily translate automatic acceptance (although they usually seem to). Not trying to worry you. Just a caution about relying on the index score as a predictor.

People still get accepted after March. I don't know. Try calling?

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Posted (edited)
52 minutes ago, realpseudonym said:

I don't know if the index is necessarily official and determinative. And I'm not sure if competitive numbers necessarily translate automatic acceptance (although they usually seem to). Not trying to worry you. Just a caution about relying on the index score as a predictor.

People still get accepted after March. I don't know. Try calling?

Competitive numbers are not necessarily translated automatic acceptance, I guess.

Maybe there are more than enough people with above the competitive numbers.

Thanks.

Edited by LawStream

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On 3/15/2018 at 5:36 PM, LawStream said:

Thanks a lot for doing this.

I have an index above 0.81 but still haven't heard anything yet.

Any idea?

From talking to classmates and other applicants it seems to me that the index score is definitely not absolute - it just makes you competitive. It's also worth noting that it's now a little late in the acceptance cycle so the remaining seats will likely be tougher to get. With that said it seems unlikely that you would not receive an offer (especially if the other components of your application are sound). I'd stay positive for the time being until you hear back for sure.

On 3/16/2018 at 1:45 AM, ChloeSilverado3 said:

How's the population diversity at the school? 

I'm told that there's more women than men and it definitely feels that way walking around the building. In terms of race/ethnicity it's fairly homogeneously white relative to the overall diversity of DAL/Halifax as a whole. 

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I'm interested to know where current students live. Is there an area that law students should avoid (due to noise, or inconvenience etc.), or is there an area where a lot of law students end up living? Do law students tend to live together in their first year? I'm looking to find a place, but I'm from Ontario, so any recommendations would be great. 

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1 hour ago, lavarius said:

From talking to classmates and other applicants it seems to me that the index score is definitely not absolute - it just makes you competitive. It's also worth noting that it's now a little late in the acceptance cycle so the remaining seats will likely be tougher to get. With that said it seems unlikely that you would not receive an offer (especially if the other components of your application are sound). I'd stay positive for the time being until you hear back for sure.

Thanks.

Fingers crossed!

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Posted (edited)

Current 2L here.

On 2018-03-16 at 1:45 AM, ChloeSilverado3 said:

How's the population diversity at the school? 

On par with every other Canadian law school, if not slightly more diverse as a result of the IB&M initiative. 

On 2018-03-20 at 6:11 PM, lsslate said:

I'm interested to know where current students live. Is there an area that law students should avoid (due to noise, or inconvenience etc.), or is there an area where a lot of law students end up living? Do law students tend to live together in their first year? I'm looking to find a place, but I'm from Ontario, so any recommendations would be great. 

Most students, law or otherwise, live in the South End; you can walk to school, bars, restaurants etc. Some students also live in the North End but have a bit more of a commute. Avoid Bayers Lake, Clayton Park and Dartmouth unless you want to be a slave to your car. 

Some law students live together (or just have random roommates). You'll start to see posts about this in the 2021 group early in the summer. Others seem to have done their own thing in 1L and then moved in with friends in 2L and 3L.

Feel free to PM me if you have any more questions!

Edited by Himalaya
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On 3/20/2018 at 6:11 PM, lsslate said:

I'm interested to know where current students live. Is there an area that law students should avoid (due to noise, or inconvenience etc.), or is there an area where a lot of law students end up living? Do law students tend to live together in their first year? I'm looking to find a place, but I'm from Ontario, so any recommendations would be great. 

People in my class live in all parts of the city but they definitely concentrate in the South End out of convenience as Himalaya said. I know some of my classmates are planning to move in with one another next year just by virtue of becoming good friends.

The only thing I'd really add to Himalaya's response is do not move into the school's residence. I know a few people who did that and they all hate it. Undergrads are generally pretty loud. 

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Thank you for doing this thread!

When is the best time to hunt for apartments? I'll have to fly out from some point, and I was wondering if you'd know if many units come available for August/September 1? I'm trying to walk the delicate balance between a later lease and ending up ridiculously far/expensive. 

Thanks!

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I moved to Halifax four years ago for my undergrad and I flew out in June for 4-5 days and had an apartment locked down for August 1st. The spring/summer is a really good time to apartment hunt in Halifax because there's a huge exodus of graduating students moving back to their home provinces, meaning lots of places up for grabs. I wouldn't worry about it too much, even though it can be a stressful situation. I really like using the website https://www.padmapper.com/apartments/halifax-ns because it aggregates listings from a bunch of different websites (kijiji, craigslist, etc.) and lists them as points on a map so you can see how close/far they are from school. Good luck! 

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On 3/27/2018 at 10:42 PM, remodify said:

Thank you for doing this thread!

When is the best time to hunt for apartments? I'll have to fly out from some point, and I was wondering if you'd know if many units come available for August/September 1? I'm trying to walk the delicate balance between a later lease and ending up ridiculously far/expensive. 

Thanks!

I personally started June 1. It took me quite some time but that's only because of a combination of me doing everything remotely, being picky, and getting screwed over by one landlord in particular. 

A ton of units open up in May with the option to sublet for the summer and then renew the lease in September. A lot of people will actually subsidize your summer rent because finding subletters is difficult. 

The vast majority of landlords insist on fixed one year leases from September to September. 

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12 hours ago, lavarius said:

I personally started June 1. It took me quite some time but that's only because of a combination of me doing everything remotely, being picky, and getting screwed over by one landlord in particular. 

A ton of units open up in May with the option to sublet for the summer and then renew the lease in September. A lot of people will actually subsidize your summer rent because finding subletters is difficult. 

The vast majority of landlords insist on fixed one year leases from September to September. 

One thing to note is that if you go with one of the professional landlord companies like Killam, Southwest, Paramount etc., then most will give you the option to switch to month to month following that first year. If you're from away, then you can always sublet your place for the summer; lots of students do this. 

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On 3/20/2018 at 5:11 PM, lsslate said:

I'm interested to know where current students live. Is there an area that law students should avoid (due to noise, or inconvenience etc.), or is there an area where a lot of law students end up living? Do law students tend to live together in their first year? I'm looking to find a place, but I'm from Ontario, so any recommendations would be great. 

I lived just north of North St. and it was about the upper limit of walkable distance in the North End (and bars in downtown Halifax). I would have liked to have lived slightly closer, but our apartment was better and less expensive than what we could have gotten in the South End. I did have a car that I used infrequently.

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Posted (edited)
On 4/5/2018 at 11:45 AM, lionelhutz54 said:

Does Dal use your last twenty credits when calculating your index score? 

Hey - sorry for the late reply. I'm currently in the midst of exams so I don't have a whole lot of time for myself. DAL uses either your cumulative GPA or your last two years - whichever is better. If you did something in your undergrad like intersession or summer courses in your last two years then your best bet is to contact admissions ASAP. 

I took like 22 courses in my last two years (as opposed to 20) because of the way I structured my degree so I had to ask them when I applied. Honestly, I can't remember what the answer was (exams have me feeling a little braindead). Moreover, when it comes to questions related to admissions procedures, it's much better to ask DAL directly as they're the only people who can give you an answer that's worth relying on. 

Also, a little note on subletting related to Himalaya's earlier post: it's great, but it's not always easy to find a sub-letter because there are plenty of students who sign 1 year leases with no intention of staying over the summer. I'm not saying it's impossible but if you do plan to sublet then I advise you start looking for an interested person well before you're ready to leave for the summer.

Edited by lavarius
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Thanks for starting this thread - Do you know of any law students who live on dorms? When I did some research I found barely anything, and the bare that I did find suggested against it.

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Posted (edited)

Current 3L. Living in res would not be conducive to 1L at all. 

Edited by Himalaya
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How is the JD/MBA program and its reputation? 

How is the legal market in Halifax?

is it easier to go back to Vancouver/Toronto after you graduate, for articling?

did students get quite a lot of scholarships in 2L and 3L?

 

 

thanks!

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