Jump to content
Luckycharm

Junior associate $20 an hour???

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, pdaddy said:

 

After taxes, I make 1306 / pay cheque. At 84 (12 hours per day at 7 days/week) hours/week thats about 7.77/hour.  I have worked more than one week at 14-16 hours per day. I don't even want to do the math to find out what that works out to.

Just so I understand, you're telling us that you work 12+ hours a day, every day of the week, for 10 months?  You, sir (madam) are truly an Iron(wo)man.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Based on the math and your (purported) hours, you still make 12.64 an hour before taxes. 

 

It's still not that crazy considering as an articling student you're probably not very profitable, if at all, for the firm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're calculating your hourly income based on take-home pay (never mind if you're doing it right or not) there's probably a reason you aren't on Bay Street advising corporations on tax law. 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Diplock said:

If you're calculating your hourly income based on take-home pay (never mind if you're doing it right or not) there's probably a reason you aren't on Bay Street advising corporations on tax law. 

=) let's be nice. It's a Monday morning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Pyke said:

=) let's be nice. It's a Monday morning.

I thought he was being nice - who wants to be the sort of degenerate who works on Bay Street advising corporations on tax law..... wait... 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bill at least 200K a year give or take, and I’m pretty sure that once I take out my contribution to office expenses and taxes, if I calculate my earnings as an hourly wage, it might only be minimum wage or less. That’s a pretty silly way to look at self-employment income, or income when you are still a student who is learning. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, maximumbob said:

I thought he was being nice - who wants to be the sort of degenerate who works on Bay Street advising corporations on tax law..... wait... 

There’s an understated appeal..... a certain je ne sais quoi....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The focus purely on $ has always seemed odd to me.  

I know, this is largely going to fall on deaf ears - but allow an old donkey to tilt at windmills for a moment.

If you focus on the quality of the work that you do, fire clients that waste your time, take interesting files that may or may not pay well -  what other job allows for the kind of personal fulfillment that this one does?

People pay me to learn stuff.  I know more about the intricacies of a 100 different trades, occupations and businesses.  I can basically set my own hours, I can work from most every place in the world that has internet, I get to meet interesting people doing interesting things every day. 

..and yet I still make enough to have a quiver of well used skis, a bike for every occasion, I see my kids every evening, make it to each and every one of their events.

Sure it can suck a bit at times, but that is why they call it work and people need to be paid to do it.

If you talk to many very successful lawyers you may find that financial success is closely related to finding an area or practice that you really like.

tldr- who the fck cares what you make articling.  

 

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, maximumbob said:

I thought he was being nice - who wants to be the sort of degenerate who works on Bay Street advising corporations on tax law..... wait... 

Out of curiosity, why do you enjoy it, if you still do? I'm getting concerned by the looks I receive when I tell lawyers I'm enjoying my tax class. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, whoknows said:

Out of curiosity, why do you enjoy it, if you still do? I'm getting concerned by the looks I receive when I tell lawyers I'm enjoying my tax class. 

Tax and family law seem to be the areas that most lawyers shy away from. Family law is scary because of emotions and tax is scary because lawyers can't math.

Seriously, I have resorted to creating charts AND showing my calculations when rescinding child support arrears and I still have to explain my basic arthimatic to opposing counsel.  

Edited by artsydork
Lawyers can't math

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, artsydork said:

Tax and family law seem to be the areas that most lawyers shy away from. Family law is scary because of emotions and tax is scary because lawyers can't math.

Seriously, I have resorted to creating charts AND showing my calculations when rescinding child support arrears and I still have to explain my basic arthimatic to opposing counsel.  

Most tax lawyers can't do math either.  Happily, we don't have to.  

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, artsydork said:

Tax and family law seem to be the areas that most lawyers shy away from. Family law is scary because of emotions and tax is scary because lawyers can't math.

Seriously, I have resorted to creating charts AND showing my calculations when rescinding child support arrears and I still have to explain my basic arthimatic to opposing counsel.  

I think a lot of people don't want to do family law because it dredges up memories of their own crappy divorces/separations. I'm finally involved in a family law matter personally for the first time in my life and it SUCKS. I wouldn't want to deal with those matters at work because I believe the courts should be a last resort for family disputes. (And I know family lawyers are supposed to, and do, advise clients of this.)

I think people think tax law involves more math that it does. Plus it involves a really dense piece of legislation and a ton of nitpicky rules. But I think the cat-and-mouse and puzzle-solving aspects of it would be fun. It's the way sophisticated people stick it to the man. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most tax lawyers don't do a great deal of math....but they usually can if they must.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, providence said:

I think a lot of people don't want to do family law because it dredges up memories of their own crappy divorces/separations. I'm finally involved in a family law matter personally for the first time in my life and it SUCKS. I wouldn't want to deal with those matters at work because I believe the courts should be a last resort for family disputes. (And I know family lawyers are supposed to, and do, advise clients of this.)

I like to think my lawyering helps people through a really difficult period.

My parents went through a nasty divorce. My siblings had to testify. They both still speak of their experience although it was 26 years ago. My parents stayed nasty towards one another for a while before calming down and moving on.

I'm proactive with clients and call them out. I also can empathize as I've been on the receiving end. 

But yeah. Like tax lawyers, minimal math. Divorcemate does all the adding for me. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, artsydork said:

I like to think my lawyering helps people through a really difficult period.

My parents went through a nasty divorce. My siblings had to testify. They both still speak of their experience although it was 26 years ago. My parents stayed nasty towards one another for a while before calming down and moving on.

I'm proactive with clients and call them out. I also can empathize as I've been on the receiving end. 

But yeah. Like tax lawyers, minimal math. Divorcemate does all the adding for me. 

You sound like a great caring lawyer to go through this with. 

 I try not to be nasty and to try to head off  any nastiness coming my way, which is why this is so hard for me. Ugh. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2018-03-19 at 10:56 AM, maximumbob said:

Just so I understand, you're telling us that you work 12+ hours a day, every day of the week, for 10 months?  You, sir (madam) are truly an Iron(wo)man.

I don't think I know many articling students working less than 12/day average.  Most people take a day or two off on weekends.  But no I do not work crazy hours every week. It comes in waves and yes sometimes I'm working a lot.  I moved to a new city where I don't know any one so I don't really know what else to do, to be honest,

On 2018-03-19 at 11:16 AM, Diplock said:

If you're calculating your hourly income based on take-home pay (never mind if you're doing it right or not) there's probably a reason you aren't on Bay Street advising corporations on tax law. 

I think I was just having fun with the whole thing.  I thought that was pretty clear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×