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Roronoaa

Another Chances Thread (3.71, 3.87, ???)

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Hello Everyone,

I went to the University of Toronto for my bachelor of science and my masters degree in medical science. 

cGPA: 3.71

B3 GPA: 3.87

Grad GPA: 4.0

LSAT: will write in July, aiming for 170

How well do I need to score on the LSAT to have a great chance at acceptance?

The other thing I'm worried about is I have no experience in law. My background is the typical premed background combined with a lot of research (4 publications, 2 book chapters, international conferences, research awards like NSERC and OGS). What can I do from now until I apply in September that will improve my EC profile. 

 

 

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If you get anything north of 167 I would say you're 100% in. Anything over 163 is still a good chance but less certain. Anything at or under 163 is going to be tough. 

 

And don't worry about the "no experience in law" thing. If anything you can cast yourself as a unique candidate and it will ultimately fortify your application, not hurt it. 

Edited by Prospero

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48 minutes ago, Prospero said:

If you get anything north of 167 I would say you're 100% in. Anything over 163 is still a good chance but less certain. Anything at or under 163 is going to be tough. 

 

And don't worry about the "no experience in law" thing. If anything you can cast yourself as a unique candidate and it will ultimately fortify your application, not hurt it. 

Thanks for your response. You are right in that I can cast myself as a unique candidate. I also think most of my experiences (particularly research exp) have given me skills which are transferable into law school. I'll be giving myself lots of time to work on my statements so that it doesn't seem like I'm switching to law on a whim. 

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1 hour ago, Roronoaa said:

Thanks for your response. You are right in that I can cast myself as a unique candidate. I also think most of my experiences (particularly research exp) have given me skills which are transferable into law school. I'll be giving myself lots of time to work on my statements so that it doesn't seem like I'm switching to law on a whim. 

And all of that will be little more then a rounding error for your application. Focus on what matters your GPA and LSAT. 

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Echoing what @Constant (the eternally wise) said above, don't worry as much about your PS. That isn't to suggest that it's unimportant, but you should be much more invested in getting a good LSAT score. I tell everyone this - the LSAT is very difficult, far worse than you may realize. Study hard for it and make sure to maintain that stellar GPA and you'll be golden. 

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