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What are some of your daily routines that you do to prep for the LSAT?

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Hey!

I have read that a lot of people have a daily routine they do during the lsat studies. 

What are some of your daily routines that you find helpful for studying for the LSAT? Is there anything in particular you did/added to your routine when you started studying?

thanks!! 

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18 minutes ago, LawyerJustice said:

Hey!

I have read that a lot of people have a daily routine they do during the lsat studies. 

What are some of your daily routines that you find helpful for studying for the LSAT? Is there anything in particular you did/added to your routine when you started studying?

thanks!! 

For me, it was more of a weekly routine that I strictly adhered to. Was PTing 168-170 and ended with a 166 on test day.  It's no 178, but I figure what I did might help you. 

Day 1/3/5: Practice Test (worked through 60-82 in order), followed by Blind Reviewing the exam (towards the later stages I was doing BR less and less). 

Day 2/4/6: Reviewing the exam a bit more thoroughly, and then doing practice sections, etc.

Day 7: Either a day off or light reviewing.

From time to time I would take a few days off to recharge. I made the awful mistake of trying to cram a couple additional PTs into the last week, which killed my scores coming up to test day. Trust me when I say taking breaks is almost imperative for success on the exam. 

Getting up at 6:30/7 to write a 9AM PT isn't really necessary until you're approaching test day, but if you already get up at this time, then do it. 

On a PT day I would highly recommend doing several questions from various sections (PTs 1-10 are great for this) before attempting the PT. For normal days I don't think a routine really matters. Section-Review-Section-Review is always decent. 

-----

However, if you're just starting to study for the LSAT (I assume you're *not* writing the February), I would highly recommend not doing any PTs for at least a couple weeks after your diagnostic. You need to start practicing the fundamentals, and the methods you'll be using for tackling the exam (obligatory plug for this post I wrote on beginning to study for the exam): http://lawstudents.ca/forums/topic/49757-so-you-want-to-take-the-lsatbut-where-do-i-begin/?do=findComment&comment=677326.

Feel free to PM me if you have any questions. 

 

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, LegalArmada said:

For me, it was more of a weekly routine that I strictly adhered to. Was PTing 168-170 and ended with a 166 on test day.  It's no 178, but I figure what I did might help you. 

Day 1/3/5: Practice Test (worked through 60-82 in order), followed by Blind Reviewing the exam (towards the later stages I was doing BR less and less). 

Day 2/4/6: Reviewing the exam a bit more thoroughly, and then doing practice sections, etc.

Day 7: Either a day off or light reviewing.

From time to time I would take a few days off to recharge. I made the awful mistake of trying to cram a couple additional PTs into the last week, which killed my scores coming up to test day. Trust me when I say taking breaks is almost imperative for success on the exam. 

Getting up at 6:30/7 to write a 9AM PT isn't really necessary until you're approaching test day, but if you already get up at this time, then do it. 

On a PT day I would highly recommend doing several questions from various sections (PTs 1-10 are great for this) before attempting the PT. For normal days I don't think a routine really matters. Section-Review-Section-Review is always decent. 

-----

However, if you're just starting to study for the LSAT (I assume you're *not* writing the February), I would highly recommend not doing any PTs for at least a couple weeks after your diagnostic. You need to start practicing the fundamentals, and the methods you'll be using for tackling the exam (obligatory plug for this post I wrote on beginning to study for the exam): http://lawstudents.ca/forums/topic/49757-so-you-want-to-take-the-lsatbut-where-do-i-begin/?do=findComment&comment=677326.

Feel free to PM me if you have any questions. 

 

 

 

 

This is perfect! Thank you so much for replying! 

I still need work with the fundamentals and already have a plan to work on those. But I really like how you divided up the 7 days and may adopt it once I’m done learning the fundamentals. I’m doing 7sage for fundamentals, I need help with logical reasoning and I’m looking forward to their lessons! 

Thanks again!!! :) 

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7sage is awesome - really helped me second time around with the LSAT. Be sure to revisit videos throughout your studies. Especially for different question types on LR. Sometimes viewing the same video lesson a month later will be completely different (ie new perspectives an that "ah ha" moment"). 

As for daily routines, as simple as this is - what really helped me was going to bed at the same time and waking up at the same time (while being sure to get 7-8 hours of sleep). This especially helped me fall asleep without stress the night before the test. Getting your sleep schedule down takes longer for some than others so make sure to do what feels right for you. It is amazing how differently you can perform/focus for long periods of time with a tired brain vs. a rested one. I also made sure to eat fairly healthy especially leading up to the test in order to avoid sugar crashes or have an upset stomach.

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I suggest integrating some exercise into your routine. Not only is it good for you, it helps you take your mind off things. I always worked out after breakfast and studied afterwards. And like the people above me have said having a healthy diet can really help. 

Edited by sucheese

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On 2018-01-10 at 1:24 AM, JDtobe said:

7sage is awesome - really helped me second time around with the LSAT. Be sure to revisit videos throughout your studies. Especially for different question types on LR. Sometimes viewing the same video lesson a month later will be completely different (ie new perspectives an that "ah ha" moment"). 

As for daily routines, as simple as this is - what really helped me was going to bed at the same time and waking up at the same time (while being sure to get 7-8 hours of sleep). This especially helped me fall asleep without stress the night before the test. Getting your sleep schedule down takes longer for some than others so make sure to do what feels right for you. It is amazing how differently you can perform/focus for long periods of time with a tired brain vs. a rested one. I also made sure to eat fairly healthy especially leading up to the test in order to avoid sugar crashes or have an upset stomach.

Yeah I noticed that 7sage is actually really good. The videos really explain everything well. I’m enjoying it! Thanks for replying btw!

Thats a good idea, my sleep schedule is out of whack and I really need a solid routine. Eating better would seem to help too, especially in regards to being able to focus right. Thanks a lot! 

14 hours ago, sucheese said:

I suggest integrating some exercise into your routine. Not only is it good for you, it helps you take your mind off things. I always worked out after breakfast and studied afterwards. And like the people above me have said having a healthy diet can really help. 

Yeah, I’ve been trying to get some excercise in my daily routine lol. I think that on the days I do - my mind functions better and I assume that the excercise ensures some sort neurological benefit. It’s just hard to fit everything in. I think with having a fixed sleep schedule, I can incorporate some gym time. Thanks so much for replying! 

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I recomend a diet of fast food. It's fast food so it will make you fast at doing the LSAT.

I think what people are saying here is great and I am not trying to denounce it in any way but just want to add a grain of realism to it. If anything, it's for the casual readers who stumble upon these forums in search for their own LSAT study advice. The aformementioned advice is great and if I had the chance to implement it into my LSAT study, I would have. But I couldn't afford it as I was working a highly variable schedule and was far too busy with other things to make that all happen. So if you are in the same position as I was, don't stress not being able to have a healthy and ideal routine.a

One tip that you can add to any routine is that you should see if you can get any study material on the go. Even if it is just a selection of logic games, its nice to have them available for whenever you have a free minute (e.g. at lunch or waiting for an appointment). It really helped me as I took the train nearly everyday and was able to do study on the go. There are also a lot of LSAT apps that are, admittedly, far from perfect but will still give you some practice problems on the go to help keep you focused.

Lastly, fast food won't make you faster at the LSAT (if only) but I have foregone making a healthy meal for fast food just so I can have some more time to focus on studying.

In other words, make your routine as healthy as you can. It will help you be at your best when you study and take the LSAT but don't let it get too much in the way of doing your studying. 

Cheers and best of luck!

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