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Has anyone worked at an international law firm and successfully transferred to a Canadian office (or vice versa)?

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I was wondering if anyone that has worked at an international law firm, be it a U.S. white-shoe law firm, Magic Circle, or international law firm with satellite offices in Canada, that managed to transfer to an office in Canada (i.e. Gowling WLG, Dentons, Norton Rose Fulbright, etc.). I am also interested if anyone has gone from a Canadian office to an office overseas as well.   

If you successfully managed to do this, it would be much appreciated if you could share your experiences here. Thanks in advance. 

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For US firms, you basically need to be doing cap markets and even then just get lucky on timing.

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4 hours ago, MinesAndMinerals said:

I know of a few lawyers who seconded to Australia and chose to stay.

Just out of curiosity how'd that arrangement come about and were they litigators or solicitors?

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4 hours ago, sng said:

For US firms, you basically need to be doing cap markets and even then just get lucky on timing.

This is inaccurate.

OP is asking about US firm lawyers moving to Canada. You can do that as an M&A associate. I know people who did it in M&A.

 

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1 hour ago, theycancallyouhoju said:

This is inaccurate.

OP is asking about US firm lawyers moving to Canada. You can do that as an M&A associate. I know people who did it in M&A.

 

Fair. I defer to you here -- nifty to know.

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On 11/28/2017 at 10:39 PM, theycancallyouhoju said:

This is inaccurate.

OP is asking about US firm lawyers moving to Canada. You can do that as an M&A associate. I know people who did it in M&A.

 

What's partnership look like for those guys? Assume 5th year NYC M&A guy at a V10 firm. Do Canadian firms look at that experience being very valuable?

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5 hours ago, Marlo said:

What's partnership look like for those guys? Assume 5th year NYC M&A guy at a V10 firm. Do Canadian firms look at that experience being very valuable?

Anecdotally, my understanding is they do fine. I'll let you know more in a few years. 

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Those that are practising American law in these Canadian offices do not have to pass the NCA process because they are not really Canadian lawyers?

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4 hours ago, Chemistry124 said:

Those that are practising American law in these Canadian offices do not have to pass the NCA process because they are not really Canadian lawyers?

More likely people who practicedin the Us (or UK) then joined Canadian firms and get called in Canada.  Often they’re people who went to law school in Canada before schlepping off abroad, so they don’t worry about the NCA and can get a waiver of articles based on their experience. 

Generally the sort of people who followed that career path and stuck around in NY or London for 5 years have something going for them and bring valuable work experience and contacts

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14 hours ago, maximumbob said:

More likely people who practicedin the Us (or UK) then joined Canadian firms and get called in Canada.  Often they’re people who went to law school in Canada before schlepping off abroad, so they don’t worry about the NCA and can get a waiver of articles based on their experience. 

Generally the sort of people who followed that career path and stuck around in NY or London for 5 years have something going for them and bring valuable work experience and contacts

So I guess those positions are even fewer in numbers if you are looking for them with an American JD?

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11 hours ago, Chemistry124 said:

So I guess those positions are even fewer in numbers if you are looking for them with an American JD?

you know what, I mis-read your question.

Yes, people who practice American law in Canadian branches of US firms don't have to pass the NCA because they don't have to be called in Canada - they do have to pass the NY bar).  They're "foreign legal consultants" who can operate in Ontario on that basis. But, I note that there are only a few firms who have a purely American presence in Canada, their footprints are small and, I think if you check, you'll find they draw heavily from Canadian law schools (no doubt because those are the people who want to work in canada).  

I wouldn't want to start my career in that venue with a US degree. If things didn't work out, it would be a pain in the ass to find work elsewhere in Canada and one suspects that the toronto office of a big US firm doesn't scream "up and comer" to other US employers. 

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6 hours ago, maximumbob said:

you know what, I mis-read your question.

Yes, people who practice American law in Canadian branches of US firms don't have to pass the NCA because they don't have to be called in Canada - they do have to pass the NY bar).  They're "foreign legal consultants" who can operate in Ontario on that basis. But, I note that there are only a few firms who have a purely American presence in Canada, their footprints are small and, I think if you check, you'll find they draw heavily from Canadian law schools (no doubt because those are the people who want to work in canada).  

I wouldn't want to start my career in that venue with a US degree. If things didn't work out, it would be a pain in the ass to find work elsewhere in Canada and one suspects that the toronto office of a big US firm doesn't scream "up and comer" to other US employers. 

Yes, I definitely would not start out in a non-US satellite office. But looking at the profiles of these foreign legal consultants, it seems like they are all practicing a narrow niche of corporate law (capital markets). I'm guessing litigation doesn't carry well over the border?

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I think it carries over, but you have to be an Ontario lawyer to appear in Ontario courts. Certainly having litigation experience in the US would be valuable in Canada, but you have to get called in Canada first - pain in the ass to do if you don't have a Canadian degree. 

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