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LawStudent1992

Should you wear a poppy?

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44 minutes ago, LawStudent1992 said:

For in-firm week in Toronto should we wear a poppy to our interviews? If yes, should we wear one on our blazers or coats?

You shouldn't wear it unless you want to. And if you want to, do whatever you want. I dunno, this is like asking "should I wear a blue tie or a red tie." It really probably doesn't matter.

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As above, you should wear it if you would normally wear it, not merely for the purposes of interviews.

Though OP were you getting at, e.g. if you normally wear it on your overcoat, should you instead wear it on your shirt/suit?

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15 minutes ago, Malicious Prosecutor said:

You don't have to.

But should you?  Easy yes.  Honour our veterans.

Not wearing one is not an active dishonourment though. Don't get lost in symbols.

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1 minute ago, thegoodlaw said:

Don't wear a white poppy. That is all.

That is a thing?

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1 minute ago, Bure10 said:

That is a thing?

I see it every once in a while on the street. More around university campuses unfortunately.

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1 hour ago, LawStudent1992 said:

For in-firm week in Toronto should we wear a poppy to our interviews? If yes, should we wear one on our blazers or coats?

Thank you!

Yes...on your jacket or equivalent. 

Edited by Constant

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22 minutes ago, artsydork said:

Not wearing one is not an active dishonourment though. Don't get lost in symbols.

I didn't say it was.  I just said the poster should wear a poppy.  Not for anything to do with interviews, but just because it's the right thing to do.

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Thanks everyone, I do wear a poppy normally. I just wanted to make sure it was appropriate for in-firm week.

I do typically wear it on my coat however, not my suit jacket.

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30 minutes ago, Bure10 said:

That is a thing?

Yes. White poppies support peace.

Good intentions but not the best symbol/timing. Honouring vets isn't to glorify war. Better use of time to promote peace at a different time.

Edited by artsydork
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3 minutes ago, LawStudent1992 said:

Thanks everyone, I do wear a poppy normally. I just wanted to make sure it was appropriate for in-firm week.

I do typically wear it on my coat however, not my suit jacket.

It's a about 50/50 people wearing it on their suit jacked - I think I did when I interviewed (worked out well, I ended up speaking with a fellow at the firm which ultimate hired me who was a veteran about my brother in the military).  

I wouldn't lose any sleep over it.  

I wouldn't wear a white poppy.  Nothing wrong with doing so, but job interviews are not necessarily the best time and place for making political statements. 

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8 minutes ago, artsydork said:

Yes. White poppies support peace.

Good intentions but not the best symbol/timing. Honouring vets isn't to glorify war. Better use of time to promote peace at a different time.

I don't think that's fair. I was born into, grew up with and lived the first decade or so of my life through a war and directly witnessed acts of war. It's not a war that Canada has veterans from or wears poppies for or even talks about. If I want to acknowledge the need for peace and healing with a white poppy because of what I experienced, at this time when we claim to want peace, how is that not a good symbol or timing? How does that say or not say anything about vets? 

Edit: I choose not to wear any poppies, white or red, because I don't like doing something because it is expected. I reflect on war, peace, sacrifice and healing on my own time. The conventional line is that veterans die or are wounded for our freedoms so we can do and say what we want, so doing so is honouring them, isn't it? I say so as someone who has lost many people to war, see above, has relatives that were wounded serving with the US forces, and currently has relatives in the US forces. 

Edited by providence
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30 minutes ago, providence said:

I don't think that's fair. I was born into, grew up with and lived the first decade or so of my life through a war and directly witnessed acts of war. It's not a war that Canada has veterans from or wears poppies for or even talks about. If I want to acknowledge the need for peace and healing with a white poppy because of what I experienced, at this time when we claim to want peace, how is that not a good symbol or timing? How does that say or not say anything about vets? 

Edit: I choose not to wear any poppies, white or red, because I don't like doing something because it is expected. I reflect on war, peace, sacrifice and healing on my own time. The conventional line is that veterans die or are wounded for our freedoms so we can do and say what we want, so doing so is honouring them, isn't it? I say so as someone who has lost many people to war, see above, has relatives that were wounded serving with the US forces, and currently has relatives in the US forces. 

I have close relatives who fought, were wounded and died in the wars remembered with red poppies. I am offended by people who wear white poppies at this time of year. Pick some other time of the year. Wear them 300+ days of the year. Why now unless to be provocative. 

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39 minutes ago, providence said:

I don't think that's fair. I was born into, grew up with and lived the first decade or so of my life through a war and directly witnessed acts of war. It's not a war that Canada has veterans from or wears poppies for or even talks about. If I want to acknowledge the need for peace and healing with a white poppy because of what I experienced, at this time when we claim to want peace, how is that not a good symbol or timing? How does that say or not say anything about vets? 

Edit: I choose not to wear any poppies, white or red, because I don't like doing something because it is expected. I reflect on war, peace, sacrifice and healing on my own time. The conventional line is that veterans die or are wounded for our freedoms so we can do and say what we want, so doing so is honouring them, isn't it? I say so as someone who has lost many people to war, see above, has relatives that were wounded serving with the US forces, and currently has relatives in the US forces. 

Because rememberance day isn’t about advocating peace so much as it’s about honouring the veterans who died in the world wars. It’s tone deaf to walk into a ceremony honouring those who died in battle for this country and saying “I don’t want to honour the dead, I want to talk about how we should have never gone to war.”   

It’s like attending a rally in support of female survivors of sexual assault and wearing a sign that says “men get raped too.” Sure, you’re factually correct, but you’re also an asshole. 

Edited by BlockedQuebecois

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15 minutes ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

Because rememberance day isn’t about advocating peace so much as it’s about honouring the veterans who died in the world wars. It’s tone deaf to walk into a ceremony honouring those who died in battle for this country and saying “I don’t want to honour the dead, I want to talk about how we should have never gone to war.”   

It’s like attending a rally in support of female survivors of sexual assault and wearing a sign that says “men get raped too.” Sure, you’re factually correct, but you’re also an asshole. 

Don't they honour veterans from every war Canada has served in? Afghanistan is usually mentioned. And if you're a civilian who was directly affected by the Afghanistan war and you wear a white poppy, I don't think that's tone deaf. You suffered too, and when else can this be acknowledged? 

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