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1L Summer Recruiting

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Hi all, 

I know I'm jumping the gun here but does anybody know the process for 1L Summer Bay St. recruiting, when it starts, and the process to apply? I'm in a JD/MBA program and my MBA program starts in July, so I'm not sure if it's even possible for me to get a 1L job. Would love to get some input from ex 1L Summer students!

 

 

 

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I think 1L for you would be your second year, or something like that. So probably you'd be able to apply for 1L jobs in your second January of law/mba. 

Not certain though. 

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Didn't have a 1L (through formal recruit I just know the answer). You can apply for 1 L jobs in your second year of the program (assuming you're doing the 4 year). So in your very first summer you can do something outside of the formal recruit and then apply in the winter of 2/4 L

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Hi I should've clarified; I'm doing the combined JD/MBA program at Western so I'd only be doing 3 years same with every other JD student. However I'll be taking JD/MBA courses in 2L and 3L. I have 2.5 months off in the summer of 1L, as I start MBA classes in mid July so I was wondering if it's even possible for firms to take me on as a 1L student for half the summer. 

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On 9/15/2017 at 3:33 PM, healthlaw said:

Didn't have a 1L (through formal recruit I just know the answer). You can apply for 1 L jobs in your second year of the program (assuming you're doing the 4 year). So in your very first summer you can do something outside of the formal recruit and then apply in the winter of 2/4 L

Just wondering why is your 1L after your 2nd year and not your first? (assuming that the 4 year MBA sequence is 1L, 2MBA, 3L/MBA, 4L/MBA) - couldn't you just have 2 "1Ls" in that regard?

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43 minutes ago, ErnestWineRibs said:

Just wondering why is your 1L after your 2nd year and not your first? (assuming that the 4 year MBA sequence is 1L, 2MBA, 3L/MBA, 4L/MBA) - couldn't you just have 2 "1Ls" in that regard?

It’s because you’re doing an extra year of school. You’re not technically a 2L until your third year of the joint program. So in your first two years you’re  completing the first year requirements of business school and law school. After that you become a 2L and start taking classes with your graduating year.  This is how osgoode and u of t does it anyway. I think op was from a different school. 

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Sorry I just reread your question. In terms of 1L hiring, a firm is not going to want to hire you after your first year because you would have to summer 3 times before articling, which would be insane. They would hire you after your second year so you could fall in line with other 1L hires

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21 hours ago, healthlaw said:

Sorry I just reread your question. In terms of 1L hiring, a firm is not going to want to hire you after your first year because you would have to summer 3 times before articling, which would be insane. They would hire you after your second year so you could fall in line with other 1L hires

Oh okay that makes more sense, thanks. I suppose that is a reason why JD/MBAs have the most success in the 1L recruit. 

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1 hour ago, ErnestWineRibs said:

Oh okay that makes more sense, thanks. I suppose that is a reason why JD/MBAs have the most success in the 1L recruit. 

I thinks it’s a couple things. Firstly, you’re right that joint students get an additional first year summer to accumulate cool experiences that make them attractive. But I also think it’s a function of being in a program that attracts competitive students in the first place. The people at my school who are drawn to the program would likely have done well in recruiting without the double degree.. so it’s hard to say whether the joint program actually made them more competitive. Probably a combo of both. They do tend to place well (can only speak to oz and u of t)

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39 minutes ago, healthlaw said:

I thinks it’s a couple things. Firstly, you’re right that joint students get an additional first year summer to accumulate cool experiences that make them attractive. But I also think it’s a function of being in a program that attracts competitive students in the first place. The people at my school who are drawn to the program would likely have done well in recruiting without the double degree.. so it’s hard to say whether the joint program actually made them more competitive. Probably a combo of both. They do tend to place well (can only speak to oz and u of t)

I was thinking being more competitive in regards to the fact that the JD/MBAs have a year of MBA education (even with how little relevance it might be to law or legal work it is still an edge above everyone else) once they enter their 1L recruit thus being more competitive. However I think your explanation makes sense, thanks. 

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On 16/10/2017 at 11:27 PM, healthlaw said:

I thinks it’s a couple things. Firstly, you’re right that joint students get an additional first year summer to accumulate cool experiences that make them attractive. But I also think it’s a function of being in a program that attracts competitive students in the first place. The people at my school who are drawn to the program would likely have done well in recruiting without the double degree.. so it’s hard to say whether the joint program actually made them more competitive. Probably a combo of both. They do tend to place well (can only speak to oz and u of t)

I honestly don't think it's the individuals. I mean to say that without disrespect. It's not necessarily true that the dual program attracts stronger applicants. I say this because most if not all people competitive enough to get into a JD program are competitive enough to get into that school's MBA program. So it boils down to choice of doing the dual or not.

 

This leads to an inference that the program makes those students more competitive for big corporate law firms. I may be wrong, but it follows.

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