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gsssss    3

Hi everyone!
I just got an offer from TRU and I'm a little confused on whether or not to accept it. My grades were okay I had an 82% cumulative average but my LSAT score was not good so I was actually not anticipating getting in to any law schools but figured I would just give it a shot. Since I hadn't heard from any law schools, I applied to and got accepted to a Masters of Arts program in Criminology. I figured I would take the two years to grow as a researcher and student as I know my writing and confidence need work. I also wasn't put on the wait list so I feel like I was offered a spot just to fill a seat. I am also from a different province so I am feeling a little overwhelmed with having less than three weeks until the start of the school semester to relocate and figure out finances. I know you can't make the decision for me, but any advice you could give me would be great.

Thanks!

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Hegdis    12289

A Masters in Criminology does not immediately lead to employment. A law degree does (with some exceptions). If you are interested in criminal law, such a Masters is neither required nor practically useful. 

Financially speaking, if you intend to be a lawyer, I would not incur the debt of a Masters as well. Piling debt upon debt will weigh you down, stress you out, and limit your options by the time you emerge with X degree. 

If you aren't even sure you want to be a lawyer then don't go. Figure it out first. It's too expensive to toy with if you just end up dropping out. 

It is important to mature and work on your writing. You can do that while in law school too. 

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gsssss    3
22 minutes ago, Hegdis said:

A Masters in Criminology does not immediately lead to employment. A law degree does (with some exceptions). If you are interested in criminal law, such a Masters is neither required nor practically useful. 

Financially speaking, if you intend to be a lawyer, I would not incur the debt of a Masters as well. Piling debt upon debt will weigh you down, stress you out, and limit your options by the time you emerge with X degree. 

If you aren't even sure you want to be a lawyer then don't go. Figure it out first. It's too expensive to toy with if you just end up dropping out. 

It is important to mature and work on your writing. You can do that while in law school too. 

Thanks for the quick response! I do want to be a lawyer, that is my career goal. I don't have to worry about incurring the debt of the masters as most of my tuition and expenses will be covered through a stipend and TAships. I think the uncertainty of what law school will be like is what is confusing me.

Thanks for your response though!

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MissJE    72

Also keep in mind the benefits of entering law school this fall as opposed to taking your chances in 2 years when it's possible you may not even be accepted. You'll be working as a lawyer at least 2 years earlier as well. And imho you probably aren't going to become a better legal researcher or writer until you start law school. The expectations and rules are so much different than other fields, even those related to law, and not that a masters wouldn't be a valuable experience, but it's not necessarily going to give you any advantage for law school.

If you want to know what law school will be like, read through as many as the threads on this forum as possible. Though to be fair, there's really nothing that will fully prepare you before you arrive and actually start. If you're curious about TRU in general, have a look through my own past posts. I am a huge advocate for TRU if you couldn't already tell :)

It's definitely a big decision especially coming from another province, but know that there will always be support for you from faculty and fellow students. If you're concerned about finding accommodations, join the TRU Law - Class of 2020 group on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/groups/1876014446008409/ There are still students looking for roommates and apartments so you're not alone there. Also, when it comes to tuition, the deadline is more what you'd call a guideline. The school knows it takes time to get loans and lines of credit in place. They usually don't start to hassle you about paying until mid-late September and even then, there's no late fees or penalties as long as you pay by semester end.

Anyway, hope this helps!

PS - please don't feel like TRU is just trying to fill seats at this point. the ad comm are very careful about who they accept despite what some people may say. the late acceptance could be for any number of reasons. if they've accepted you, it's because they believe there is something about your application that has value and that you will be successful. it's not because they don't have anyone else to take the spot.

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akulamasusu    90
Posted (edited)

If I were you, I would study LAW rather than Criminology..Even thought that may sound prompt ,but after all you are still in. If I were you, I would study LAW rather than Criminology, law is much more interesting, useful, practical than criminology in many  aspect and  occasions. I actually ever took a full year courses of criminology because I cannot register any upper year law classes at that time. I end up registering criminology classes in accident,  but I thought this class would be as interesting as criminal law but in fact criminology is boring..   Law courses in contrast far more practical, interesting and profound.

I think the criminology , talk about ( I just cannot remember it all )  I personally feel some aspect of this subject is really boring sometimes.

Broken window theory crime prevention, it just talk about a car window is broken, if you don't fix that right now, more serious crime offence would take place. The site is unregulated and uncontrolled will attract more and more criminal activity.  They eventually all come up or set up with a bunch of crime prevention theory , or  how to efficiently cracked cases theory.

If one choose to study criminology, one may study something about white collar crime. Sometimes it may talk technology crime, doctor mal-practices, How those doctor cooperate with pharmaceutical company to prescript or use certain drugs for mutual benefits in violation of law.   A few topic like human trafficking may be interesting , it may tell how those people smuggling gang import people, and ship them across border at night with various transportation , but lots of criminology topics sound very boring to me , I feel some of its content are very common sense.  mal-practice of doctor crimes, Hacker crime, one may get that  those criminal activities by reading daily newspaper sometimes,  one may get some of stuff from reading daily newspaper already or watch News on TV. 

 

I would still highly encourage law rather than criminology.  Don't do criminology if you have the option. Unless you really really enjoy that program and want to study lengthy PHD in criminology,  I would probably say law JD is far better option than  master of criminology.  It's marketable program, master of criminology is probably theoretical  

Edited by akulamasusu

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akulamasusu    90
Posted (edited)

My experience to study one course of criminology is just to result in low satisfication.. It's not very profound, interesting, insightful, or intellectual or comparable to my many law classes at all..  Criminology is just teach you how to become a good "  police officers " mainly what would theoretically how to crack crime faster theoretically. or analyze " what's the possible crime out there" 

It's not really lead you directly to become a lawyer sometimes.

I remember I study a few chapter of criminology books, "   hotspots, Crime hotspots are areas on a map that have high crime intensity.  It just teach crime usually happen in a few of stationary or fixed neighboring hood , that usually has much higher crime intensity. They just come up with  measures as cameras, lighting, guards and alarms.

 Preservation of evidence in crime scene has vital importance and strong correlation to  crack a criminal case. I didn't deny the important of collection evidence,  But I would like to add is  " nowadays we have lots of indirect evidence such as tones of security camera everywhere on street to trace suspect, in my country in Asia, we lots of recording security camera hanging on electric line pole on every streets " Police will utilize those and capture  suspect much easily that way. Those security camera recorder dates, time , locations., and images...If crime scene has some evidence, it will converge toward the similar point. , World revolutionized or evolution-zed,  

It's no longer as un-susceptible ,  as it was in the past.

 

Or Financial Crime Investigation, those suspect or criminal would rather sit in the jail for a decade rather than tell detective where they hide the money. When they have a parole and comes out, the whole world is their oyster.

I think criminology help one to become a better  police office or detective rather than become a lawyer.  I strongly advice you to select law rather than criminology. Criminology is detour and one has to jump through the hoop, in addition, it's indeed very boring and not very correlated sometimes. It's boring to a point sometimes I don't even know what to say. Some of chapters are more common senses like you had read those from past newspaper already..  It direct one how to become normally functioning police or detective and teach them what's possible crime out there and what might the possibles ways to prevent it,   rather than leading one to become a lawyer.

After all it's all up to you.  But at least I make a genuine effort to inform you not to study criminology

if you have a chance to study law directly, I will say go for law without hesitation.

 

Edited by akulamasusu

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Bure10    678

I got accepted to a sociology Major and then law school at TRU.

I picked TRU without even considering the masters, I am a practicing lawyer in the town where I wanted to practice.

Go to TRU if you want to go to law school and be a lawyer.

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Stark    531

I agree with everyone else.  If your goal is to become a lawyer, it seems like a no brainer to accept your law school acceptance.  As others have stated, the Masters in Criminology isn't going to do much to make you more prepared for law school.  I can understand and appreciate wanting to develop your research and writing skills, but that will automatically happen in law school.  You also run the risk of not getting accepted 2 years down the road when you've got the MA so that's something to think about as well.

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akulamasusu    90
Posted (edited)

I just say some perspective that I observed in master program in Asia.

Regarding about master program, I have something more to say too. Only a quarter of  master dissertation books that I read has higher research values, and the rest of dissertation is just to serve only for fulfilling graduation requirement of master program. If I am accepted to master program of law, I probably might have to choose an easier topic and write something easier and lower research values to just fulfill the graduation requirement.  To write something has more research values  is sometimes associated with scholarly quality , innate talents, levels, and time. But master students want to graduate in time, that's the things, therefore three quarter of them cannot hardly contribute very meaningful work sometimes.

I also witness some master of law students just cannot graduate from master program, because they failed to complete or compile "that book" , 1/3 of admitted students drop out and cannot complete that program because of that damn book. The maximum length of master program is four year, they just exhaust or use up the time and fail to deliver the books. I have observed the successful graduation rate of master of law is just 2/3. Because part of master program is not completely lectured based courses, and it's somewhat  different  from conventional learning, one have to construct a 150 page , somewhat logical and coherent book. I see a couple of my friends who did Master program in other field, such as pharmacy, recreational management, restaurant gourmet, health, I can only comment that their dissertation,. Even though I have no prior knowledge of their field, I might be able to comment on their dissertation. Their research work is understandable but their research value is just lower. Yes, at least, they completed that program , earn the degree and undeniably learn some skill how to write a lengthy research project, or conduct some experimental or survey research, draw some conclusion from scientific data.   Their research work is understandable but their research value is just lower. I think one of primary reason is that one sometimes cannot select too hard topic because it just disturb, trouble oneself sometimes, and just severely delay the time of graduation sometimes. But at the same time, national library just has more sources of  less useful sources piling up in national library. I really think sometimes some master students really have options not to write  dissertation as requirement if they do not plan to go on academia or they simply just do not want to write one.  Only the one quarter of admitted master students,  write a much better pieces of works comparatively,  is not going to become a scholar or research. It just show the level difference through the works and one can do things right for future references only.

Master program probably has partial mission to help the society progress or break through and become a better places,. But the things is , most of master students  would not become scholar or researcher or go on Ph.d, even a quarter  of master students can be capable of advancing to ph.d degree. But some of those above average  of master students just do not go on Ph.d level because of lengthy program and want to find some work after graduation. But some program intrinsically has more challenging in this regard compared to other program.

I think if OP want the direct employment after graduation, one should select law rather than criminology. In term of knowledge inspiration and enlightenment, intellectual stimulus , or employment, law probably can give one much more than criminology in several  aspects.

Edited by akulamasusu

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gsssss    3

Hi everyone,

I wanted to thank you for all your advice. Thank you for taking the time to respond to my post! I have decided to attend law school at TRU.

Thanks!

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MissJE    72
8 minutes ago, gsssss said:

Hi everyone,

I wanted to thank you for all your advice. Thank you for taking the time to respond to my post! I have decided to attend law school at TRU.

Thanks!

Don't forget to join the class of 2020 facebook group if you haven't already. There is an orientation week schedule posted there if you didn't already get one via email. You'll definitely want to participate in all the events!

Welcome to TRU!

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1876014446008409/

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On 9/4/2017 at 2:38 AM, gsssss said:

Hi everyone,

I wanted to thank you for all your advice. Thank you for taking the time to respond to my post! I have decided to attend law school at TRU.

Thanks!

Mind if I ask your stats?? (CGPA on 4.0, LSAT)

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