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PassingTime

School Rankings by Admission Standards?

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I know law school rankings in Canada can usually be dismissed, but there's obviously a difference in admission standards between schools.

Given that, what do you think are the 'easiest' schools to get into? The most difficult?

From hardest to easiest, I think:

Top: Toronto, Osgoode, McGill, Queen's & Dalhousie

Bottom: Windsor, Thompson River, UVic... maybe New Brunswick and Manitoba?

What do you think?

 

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A user with the first post bringing up a school ranking debate not the best look.

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16 minutes ago, kurrika said:

Why do you care?

Research. My LSAT score is not competitive enough for the top brass. So I'm looking elsewhere.

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1 minute ago, PassingTime said:

Research. My LSAT score is not competitive enough for the top brass. So I'm looking elsewhere.

Then asses your application and look at the schools admissions criteria and find the schools that best fit your application.

How are your grades distributed, how were your ECs, does the school weigh LSAT or GPA more.

They mostly do it differently so work within what you have, find your fit(s) and apply.

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1 minute ago, Bure10 said:

Then asses your application and look at the schools admissions criteria and find the schools that best fit your application.

That's what I'm doing now - and why I'm here.

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5 minutes ago, PassingTime said:

That's what I'm doing now - and why I'm here.

I think you're missing Bure's point. There isn't some sort of established spectrum of easy to hard. Each school prioritizes different aspects during admission to the point that a post like this has absolutely no value. For example, somebody with crap stats but amazing softs wouldn't be prioritized at U of A as it's predominantly a numbers based school. That previous example wouldn't be true at U of C as they're more holistic in their admissions. Perhaps it is wise to spend some time in each school's forum and as Bure mentioned to do some research on what school fit(s) your application best. You would have had a completely different response if you simply asked a general question involving what schools have historically prioritized during admissions instead of trying establish this completely subjective ranking based on "ease" of entry. 

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7 minutes ago, Atlas said:

I think you're missing Bure's point. There isn't some sort of established spectrum of easy to hard. Each school prioritizes different aspects during admission to the point that a post like this has absolutely no value. For example, somebody with crap stats but amazing softs wouldn't be prioritized at U of A as it's predominantly a numbers based school. That previous example wouldn't be true at U of C as they're more holistic in their admissions. Perhaps it is wise to spend some time in each school's forum and as Bure mentioned to do some research on what school fit(s) your application best. You would have had a completely different response if you simply asked a general question involving what schools have historically prioritized during admissions instead of trying establish this completely subjective ranking based on "ease" of entry. 

Thanks for the response, you're right.

What the school prioritizes is what I'm trying to ascertain with this thread. I should have given more thought to my main question.

Essentially, I am looking for schools that adopt a holistic admission model.

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1 minute ago, PassingTime said:

Thanks for the response, you're right.

What the school prioritizes is what I'm trying to ascertain with this thread. I should have given more thought to my main question.

Essentially, I am looking for schools that adopt a holistic admission model.

Calgary, TRU, Windsor and Lakehead.

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2 hours ago, PassingTime said:

I know law school rankings in Canada can usually be dismissed, but there's obviously a difference in admission standards between schools.

Given that, what do you think are the 'easiest' schools to get into? The most difficult?

From hardest to easiest, I think:

Top: Toronto, Osgoode, McGill, Queen's & Dalhousie

Bottom: Windsor, Thompson River, UVic... maybe New Brunswick and Manitoba?

What do you think?

 

I agree that this is all a bit silly but I don't agree with your order in terms of difficulty if you're just talking about numbers.

 

"Top": Toronto, Osgoode, McGill, UBC, UVic


They all use slightly different criteria though, as other have mentioned so it really depends on the candidate.

 

I got into UBC but probably wouldn't get into Windsor because I have basically no volunteering or social justice experience.

Edited by Starling
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10 hours ago, Starling said:

I agree that this is all a bit silly but I don't agree with your order in terms of difficulty if you're just talking about numbers.

 

"Top": Toronto, Osgoode, McGill, UBC, UVic


They all use slightly different criteria though, as other have mentioned so it really depends on the candidate.

 

I got into UBC but probably wouldn't get into Windsor because I have basically no volunteering or social justice experience.

Yup this is really true. UBC and U of T have pretty similar numbers, but UBC is purely a numbers school (just GPA and LSAT are considered) where U of T is more holistic in their selection by awarding 1/3 of the weight in admissions to the personal statement. 

So difficulty is really relative. If you just have good stats and a blank resume you'll cruise into the index schools like UBC or Alberta. If you have have a mix of stats and ECs places like U of T, Osgoode, or McGill might wind up being relatively "easier" than UBC if your numbers don't quite meet UBCs cutoff. 

There is a really interesting YouTube video that's about two hours long by a University if Virginia law Dean about law school applications. He talks about how there is room for most candidates in law schools but that many students misapply, eg if you have a 3.3 and a 155 it doesn't make much sense to apply to UVA where you need a 3.75 and a 169. Food for thought I guess. 

 

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14 hours ago, DenningsSkiTrip said:

There is a really interesting YouTube video that's about two hours long by a University if Virginia law Dean about law school applications. He talks about how there is room for most candidates in law schools but that many students misapply, eg if you have a 3.3 and a 155 it doesn't make much sense to apply to UVA where you need a 3.75 and a 169. Food for thought I guess. 

 

Maybe adopting the 'Oprah-Winfrey-Approach' to law school admissions is the reason so many graduates are having a hard time finding jobs down there.

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2 hours ago, FunnyLawName said:

Maybe adopting the 'Oprah-Winfrey-Approach' to law school admissions is the reason so many graduates are having a hard time finding jobs down there.

You get an application! You get an application!

Everybody gets an application!!!

*audience screams*

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On 8/14/2017 at 0:22 PM, PassingTime said:

Research. My LSAT score is not competitive enough for the top brass. So I'm looking elsewhere.

Maybe you should stop caring so much about researching which schools you might get into to and more time studying for the LSAT if you're concerned that your score is hindering your chances to get into law school.

It really bothers me when people waste their time obsessing over which schools they think they'll get into based on their stats compared to previous cycles of admissions. You're putting unnecessary stress on yourself by "researching" what schools are "easier" to get into and it's neither productive nor helpful.

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2 hours ago, Plinko said:

Maybe you should stop caring so much about researching which schools you might get into to and more time studying for the LSAT if you're concerned that your score is hindering your chances to get into law school.

It really bothers me when people waste their time obsessing over which schools they think they'll get into based on their stats compared to previous cycles of admissions. You're putting unnecessary stress on yourself by "researching" what schools are "easier" to get into and it's neither productive nor helpful.

When you aren't made of money, it's not a waste of time to save the money. If you're a fringe canadian law applicant, sure, you can apply to all of them. But if you don't have the 3 grand or so, it's good to research chances and eliminate the schools you can't get into.

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Your original classification of schools from hardest to easiest is correct.

Don't listen to people who say things like "Well that's not accurate because Windsor/Lakehead are more holistic."
In this case, as in every case, "holistic" is just a euphemism for "has lower standards because its a worse school" - and if its not being used in that context - aka U of T - its basically the school posturing that they care about more than just grades (*cough* they really only care about grades). 

If you don't have the grades for a school, you're throwing up a hail mary. Some times hail marys get caught, sometimes they don't. Just take a reasonable look at previous years lsat/gpa medians and you'll see what schools you're competitive for. 

People love to think that their school just has a more rainbow-y, holistic approach to admissions because they got in and, after all, they're special. They don't. There's good schools and there's not so good ones. People with good grades tend to go to the good ones. That's life. 

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2 hours ago, Plinko said:

Maybe you should stop caring so much about researching which schools you might get into to and more time studying for the LSAT if you're concerned that your score is hindering your chances to get into law school.

It really bothers me when people waste their time obsessing over which schools they think they'll get into based on their stats compared to previous cycles of admissions. You're putting unnecessary stress on yourself by "researching" what schools are "easier" to get into and it's neither productive nor helpful.

I agree with pzabby, I think it's important to research which schools you can/can't realistically get into before you apply. Not only do you save money by not wasting it on schools you're too far off to get into, you can avoid wasting time on apps for those schools, and better craft your materials for the schools you have a better chance at. 

As far as stress goes, applying to law school is a stressful experience no matter what, you can't avoid it it's just something you have to deal with. 

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8 hours ago, DenningsSkiTrip said:

I agree with pzabby, I think it's important to research which schools you can/can't realistically get into before you apply. Not only do you save money by not wasting it on schools you're too far off to get into, you can avoid wasting time on apps for those schools, and better craft your materials for the schools you have a better chance at. 

As far as stress goes, applying to law school is a stressful experience no matter what, you can't avoid it it's just something you have to deal with. 

If you get into law school and become a lawyer this will be true for the rest of your life - it just doesn't end. It starts with the LSAT, then law school applications, then applying for moots, or clinics or special courses that require applications, then summer student jobs, then BEING A SUMMER STUDENT (I'll never forget receiving my first small claims file and being scared sh*tless because I knew nothing and was meeting with the client), getting an articling spot, getting hired back, finding a job as a lawyer, and then doing lawyer work where you really just feel like a big liability all the time. 

Get used to it my friend - stress is the name of the game. 

 

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On 2017-08-15 at 9:20 PM, BillyBishop said:

Your original classification of schools from hardest to easiest is correct.

Don't listen to people who say things like "Well that's not accurate because Windsor/Lakehead are more holistic."
In this case, as in every case, "holistic" is just a euphemism for "has lower standards because its a worse school" - and if its not being used in that context - aka U of T - its basically the school posturing that they care about more than just grades (*cough* they really only care about grades). 

If you don't have the grades for a school, you're throwing up a hail mary. Some times hail marys get caught, sometimes they don't. Just take a reasonable look at previous years lsat/gpa medians and you'll see what schools you're competitive for. 

People love to think that their school just has a more rainbow-y, holistic approach to admissions because they got in and, after all, they're special. They don't. There's good schools and there's not so good ones. People with good grades tend to go to the good ones. That's life. 

wrong

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^Completely wrong. But this is ls.ca. Some of us are incredibly insecure and need to shit on others to feel good about ourselves. Even if the feeling only lasts a couple of minutes.

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