ubclawstudent

Is a JD a 'graduate degree' or a 'professional degree'?

36 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

I think my country one of medical college just renamed one if it's program from  Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine to Doctor of Veterinary Medicine.  It said one want to be geared with international standard and be recognized by   school internationally and creating less confusion.

I think in my country, some senior doctor said , they were entitled with M.B.  , not  M. D.     Now those name changed to MD mostly for majority of schools. I think probably a few year ago, a medical school still give "M.B."  , so if those applicants want to study abroad for advanced study, a few of them still feel anxious and wonder if they need to explain their program, what is " M.B " if they want to apply foreign medical education for further study, and sometimes system is slightly different from  one's own.

LLB?     JD?     J.B?  

I guess maybe it's just a name for a law degree.  Don't read too much into the name. I think people might care about its functionality rather than name. My guess.

 

Kiamia is funny.

 

 

Edited by akulamasusu
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, maximumbob said:

Has anyone ever been asked those questions, in Canada?  

Now, someone in the uK might ask the former question.  Of course, if we called our JD/LLB as CLB, for example, your solution would result in them asking, what the heck is a CLB.  

I'm fairly sure no one has ever asked the second question.  

But aren't those questions basically variations of the question that started the thread? (i.e. basic questions about the status of the degree?) I think those questions will never end because the Canadian law degree doesn't really fit with either the UK or US degrees, which were designed for those legal systems - maybe we could have designed a name that worked for Canada? Canadian solution may have had a chance to move beyond the pre-made boxes of LLB or JD, which both give rise to comparisons that don't make sense.

 

Edited by conge
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

What do letters matter?  Not much I think.  Common Law schools in Canada used L.L.B, and now use J.D.  Other letters were used before.  For example.... UNB used B.C.L. before 1969.....then L.L.B from then on until switching to J.D. recently.  I really don't think it matters much.  .Employers know there's really no difference,...... and clients walking in off the street in a sole practice don't know and don't care.....they just want to know if you are a lawyer and can help them.  And, you most likely can regardless of the letters on your parchment.  

 

Edited by Captain Courageous
clarification

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JD is like a typical undergraduate degree, except for the following two distinctions:

1. It takes less time to get a JD; and

2. You don't actually have to do well in the JD program to be awarded the degree. In fact, you could do almost no work and fail to comprehend every subject area by any reasonable standard and the curve will still take care of you.

Edited by Mountebank
3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Mountebank said:

JD is like a typical undergraduate degree, except for the following two distinctions:

1. It takes less time to get a JD; and

2. You don't actually have to do well in the JD program to be awarded the degree. In fact, you could do almost no work and fail to comprehend every subject area by any reasonable standard and the curve will still take care of you.

I mean, you don't really have to "do well" with your undergraduate degree (barring a few exceptions) to be awarded the degree either. As the saying goes - Ds get degrees. It's just, afterwards, they end up wishing they hadn't sunk their undergraduate tuition and opportunities on weed and piss beer at frat parties.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Mountebank said:

JD is like a typical undergraduate degree, except for the following two distinctions:

1. It takes less time to get a JD; and

2. You don't actually have to do well in the JD program to be awarded the degree. In fact, you could do almost no work and fail to comprehend every subject area by any reasonable standard and the curve will still take care of you.

I thought the original post was brilliant and much funnier than the edit.

And really, there's really only one distinction "it costs more".  

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, maximumbob said:

I thought the original post was brilliant and much funnier than the edit.

And really, there's really only one distinction "it costs more".  

DAMMIT you're right about the edit. I wish I were so clever, but I just pressed "enter" by accident.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2017-08-13 at 10:13 PM, epeeist said:

[...]

WHEREAS, the acquisition of a Doctor of Jurisprudence degree requires from 84 to 90 semester hours of post baccalaureate study and the Doctor of Philosophy degree usually requires 60 semester hours of post baccalaureate study along with the writing of a dissertation, the two degrees shall be considered as equivalent degrees for educational employment purposes;...'" [emphasis in original, emphasis added]

http://abovethelaw.com/2011/11/any-lawyer-who-calls-himself-doctor-like-a-ph-d-should-get-punched-in-the-mouth/

[...]

It's nice that the writing of a dissertation is mentioned as a small technical requirement. Sure, that 300 page behemoth that had to literally further the field to which it is associated has to be written, but lets just talk about the handful of courses doctoral candidates take that are literally an afterthought to most graduate students and compare how similar that aspect is.

i've done both degrees and they are not similar at all. A PhD has to further the field. http://matt.might.net/articles/phd-school-in-pictures/  That contains a good visual representation of the difference between undergraduate, masters, and doctoral degrees. A law degree is substantially closer to an MD, which are both extended undergrad programs.

Also, as far as I know, you need an undergrad to get a PhD, but you do not need a masters.

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, S.U. said:

It's nice that the writing of a dissertation is mentioned as a small technical requirement. Sure, that 300 page behemoth that had to literally further the field to which it is associated has to be written, but lets just talk about the handful of courses doctoral candidates take that are literally an afterthought to most graduate students and compare how similar that aspect is.

i've done both degrees and they are not similar at all. A PhD has to further the field. http://matt.might.net/articles/phd-school-in-pictures/  That contains a good visual representation of the difference between undergraduate, masters, and doctoral degrees. A law degree is substantially closer to an MD, which are both extended undergrad programs.

Also, as far as I know, you need an undergrad to get a PhD, but you do not need a masters.

I thought it was clear in my post, I'm contemptuous of the ABA committee's notion that they're equivalent; we are not in disagreement.

A professional LLM was more than enough for me (75 page original but not furthering the field requirement) that I never seriously considered going further (though I did know at least one classmate who did the professional LLM to Ph.D. route...).

Out of curiosity, I knew one Ph.D. who at law school graduation wore their doctoral robes (apparently you're supposed to wear your most senior degree's garb at academic functions or something?), was that the case for you?

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2017-08-18 at 9:57 AM, epeeist said:

Out of curiosity, I knew one Ph.D. who at law school graduation wore their doctoral robes (apparently you're supposed to wear your most senior degree's garb at academic functions or something?), was that the case for you?

No, I wore the black undergrad robe because that was the degree being conferred onto me. I also knelt to be hooded even though I am permitted to stand for hoodings because, again, I was being hooded for a "lesser" degree. Should I attend any convocations as part of the procession moving forward though, I would wear the PhD robe. (Honestly, a big factor was I didn't want to stick out badly at the ceremony--all my classmates earned the same degree as me, so I shouldn't wear fancier robes and be an eyesore.)

4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, S.U. said:

No, I wore the black undergrad robe because that was the degree being conferred onto me. I also knelt to be hooded even though I am permitted to stand for hoodings because, again, I was being hooded for a "lesser" degree. Should I attend any convocations as part of the procession moving forward though, I would wear the PhD robe. (Honestly, a big factor was I didn't want to stick out badly at the ceremony--all my classmates earned the same degree as me, so I shouldn't wear fancier robes and be an eyesore.)

This is a great example of how to properly answer most questions in etiquette and professional practice. There are rules. It is good to know the rules, and as a matter of general application they usually guide you well. But then there's the universal rule, sort of the constitutional authority above all other rules, that simply directs "don't be a douche." And as long as you keep that in mind you can't go far wrong.

6 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was never into pomp and circumstance.  I didn't attend either my undergrad or Law grad ceremony.  In both cases I just picked up my degree at the Registrars office and went on my way.  I had to attend the Call ceremony to be sworn in of course.....and.....to my surprise, I really enjoyed it.  

Edited by Captain Courageous
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I preferred law school grad to my call. At grad, I felt a strong sense of accomplishment and sacrifices bearing fruit but at Call, I was just glad to be done.

 In terms of what to call the degree, I'm glad to have a JD as I'm from the US and if I ever decide to go back at least I have the right degree.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think it really matters all that much.

All that said, I don't think MDs are all that different from JDs. In the end, you spent 5+ (and probably, 7+) years in school to (likely) earn multiple degrees. Whether they're graduate, professional, second-entry, or any other term, what difference does it make?

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/18/2017 at 1:37 AM, Mountebank said:

JD is like a typical undergraduate degree, except for the following two distinctions:

1. It takes less time to get a JD; and

2. You don't actually have to do well in the JD program to be awarded the degree. In fact, you could do almost no work and fail to comprehend every subject area by any reasonable standard and the curve will still take care of you.

I remember sometime mid-first year I found out the only way to fail law school was to literally not show up to any exams and I had a sudden, tv sitcom-esque flashback to the day my mom explained that my friend Avi wasn't moving onto grade 3 because he hadn't passed the requirements for grade 2. I couldn't - and still can't - tell if I was happy or devastated to realize I'd found a place where moving up was easier than grade school. 

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.