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Is there a way I could obtain a list of the required readings/textbooks I will require for certain courses?

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Is there a way I could obtain a list of the required readings/textbooks I will require for certain courses?

I want reading related to tax, contact, and real estate courses.

Thanks

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but I get the impression from your question that you're a 0L who feels that getting a leg up on classwork throughout the summer will give you some sort of advantage come September. If this is the case, I will give you the same advice I have given to  others who have asked similar questions in this forum - it won't. Enjoy your final summer of freedom and rest because the only thing that will put you ahead in the fall is arriving at school not exhausted and ready to work hard. 

In 1L, courses like tax and real estate will not be offered to you. There is no way to get a list of the required readings and textbooks for upcoming classes, and it is foolish to rely on anything that you come across from previous years because professors change texts and readings all of the time. 

 

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I am the 0Lsl worrying about being left behind since I am an international student, without much knowledge about Canada. I did research and learned that the best way to prepare before law school is to enjoy the last summer vacation.

If possible, would you please recommend some books introducing history, culture, society, community etc to me? I think those books might help me somehow relieve those worries about new beginning.

Many thanks.

On 6/27/2017 at 10:43 AM, Lawtender33 said:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I get the impression from your question that you're a 0L who feels that getting a leg up on classwork throughout the summer will give you some sort of advantage come September. If this is the case, I will give you the same advice I have given to  others who have asked similar questions in this forum - it won't. Enjoy your final summer of freedom and rest because the only thing that will put you ahead in the fall is arriving at school not exhausted and ready to work hard. 

In 1L, courses like tax and real estate will not be offered to you. There is no way to get a list of the required readings and textbooks for upcoming classes, and it is foolish to rely on anything that you come across from previous years because professors change texts and readings all of the time. 

 

 

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17 hours ago, Bao said:

I am the 0Lsl worrying about being left behind since I am an international student, without much knowledge about Canada. I did research and learned that the best way to prepare before law school is to enjoy the last summer vacation.

If possible, would you please recommend some books introducing history, culture, society, community etc to me? I think those books might help me somehow relieve those worries about new beginning.

Many thanks.

 

Unfortunately I'm not the best person to ask since I mainly read books related to international issues and lately, a lot on criminal law. I recommend starting a new thread with this question. I'm sure you'll get a lot of good feedback!

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17 hours ago, Bao said:

I am the 0Lsl worrying about being left behind since I am an international student, without much knowledge about Canada. I did research and learned that the best way to prepare before law school is to enjoy the last summer vacation.

If possible, would you please recommend some books introducing history, culture, society, community etc to me? I think those books might help me somehow relieve those worries about new beginning.

Many thanks.

 

 

Hey! Was not too familiar with Canadian law either going into first year. My Constitutional Law professor recommended reading Eugene Forsey's "How Canadians Govern Themselves" for those without much background in the basics of Canadian government and general constitutional arrangements. 

I read a bit of it and found it a bit helpful. Also had to read (meaning assigned by Professor) John Borrows' "Freedom and Indigenous Constitutionalism"- good for some understanding of Indigenous peoples' history and relationship to Constitutional law.

  Other than that I think you learn a lot in 1L as you go along regarding the general structure of the Canadian common- law system in first year through the varied courses. 

If you want, you can also read up about how the common law system works but Legal Process basically teaches you this. 

 

Sorry this response is a bit scattered. I hope it helps. 

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20 hours ago, Bao said:

I am the 0Lsl worrying about being left behind since I am an international student, without much knowledge about Canada. I did research and learned that the best way to prepare before law school is to enjoy the last summer vacation.

If possible, would you please recommend some books introducing history, culture, society, community etc to me? I think those books might help me somehow relieve those worries about new beginning.

Many thanks.

 

 

 

Where did you do your undergrad ?

What was your major?

How long have you been in Canada?

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5 hours ago, purplehibiscus said:

Hey! Was not too familiar with Canadian law either going into first year. My Constitutional Law professor recommended reading Eugene Forsey's "How Canadians Govern Themselves" for those without much background in the basics of Canadian government and general constitutional arrangements. 

I read a bit of it and found it a bit helpful. Also had to read (meaning assigned by Professor) John Borrows' "Freedom and Indigenous Constitutionalism"- good for some understanding of Indigenous peoples' history and relationship to Constitutional law.

  Other than that I think you learn a lot in 1L as you go along regarding the general structure of the Canadian common- law system in first year through the varied courses. 

If you want, you can also read up about how the common law system works but Legal Process basically teaches you this. 

 

Sorry this response is a bit scattered. I hope it helps. 

Thank you. Purplehibiscus. 

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1 hour ago, Luckycharm said:

 

 

Where did you do your undergrad ?

What was your major?

How long have you been in Canada?

I did my Bachelor Master and PhD (recently graduated) in law in China. While I was sophomore for PhD program, I spent one year visiting Victoria University, Canada. Only got some scattered knowledge about aboriginal culture from my peers' research (many of them did their papers on First Nation). 

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5 hours ago, Lawtender33 said:

Unfortunately I'm not the best person to ask since I mainly read books related to international issues and lately, a lot on criminal law. I recommend starting a new thread with this question. I'm sure you'll get a lot of good feedback!

I'm new here, gonna figure out how to start a new thread. :) Thank you anyway.

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Good luck

 

First Year

 

Students take seven mandatory courses and one elective in first year.

Course Descriptions

Ethical Lawyering in a Global Community

This course provides an introduction to the legal profession, professional norms and values, and the ethical issues that lawyers grapple with not only in the context of their many and varied roles, but also as members of a profession with collective responsibilities in relation to the public interest and access to justice.  The course situates these issues within their modern-day context; that is, within a context characterized by local diverse communities, globalization, legal pluralism, transnationalism and internationalization.

Legal Process

This course integrates legal research and writing (in the fall term) and civil procedure (in the winter term) and is designed to (1) encourage students to consider lawyers’ professional and ethical responsibilities; (2) assist students to develop ways of thinking about legal problems that will be applied both during and after law school; and (3) assist students to understand and critically assess various dispute resolution mechanisms. Students will examine the core legal principles of fairness, due process and accountability in decision-making, which form the foundation of Canadian administrative law and civil procedure.

State and Citizen: Canadian Public and Constitutional Law

This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of Canadian Constitutional law, focussing on the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Aboriginal Rights, the division of powers between the Federal and Provincial governments and between the individual and the collective. The course examines the nature, sources and role of public and administrative law in Canada, including the  scope of the regulatory state (boards, tribunals, agencies), and the role of the legislature, executive and judiciary and the common law constraints on executive action. Students will examine the evolving nature of state regulation, the relationship between domestic and international law, and the distinct features of common law decision-making, statutory interpretation and constitutional interpretation.

Contracts

This course provides an introduction to the law of contracts. The course examines the structure, principles, policies and doctrines of the law of contracts. Topics considered include institutions of contract law; formation of contracts; enforcement of promises; contracts and third parties; protection of weaker parties; misrepresentation; contractual terms; breach of contract; standard form contracts and exclusion clauses; and contractual remedies.

Criminal Law

This course is designed to introduce students to the main doctrinal elements of Canadian criminal law.  Students will develop methodological skills and techniques of legal analysis, which includes an introduction to the Criminal Code and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the interpretation of statutory and constitutional materials. The course also involves critical discussion and debate on broader policy questions of criminal responsibility.

Torts

This course introduces students to the fundamental doctrines of tort law, including the tort of negligence, intentional torts and strict liability.  It will also examine the tort remedies available to compensate for personal injuries and property damage and will explore various jurisprudential perspectives on tort law.

Property Law

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of real and personal property law in Canada.  It explores the concepts of ownership and possession, what sets of property rights exist in what kinds of assets, and how these can be created, transferred, shared and extinguished.

Elective Course Descriptions

In addition to the mandatory courses listed above, every first-year student must successfully complete one of the following elective courses:

Legal Theory Seminar

This course explores the historical transition from a community-based conception of law and rights to a conception of universal human rights grounded in a body of law that transcends the limits of particular communities and states.  The course considers a variety of readings drawn from such disciplines as history, anthropology, psychology, philosophy, political science and law.  The seminar functions as a small, tutorial-style reading group and emphasizes critical engagement with texts, intensive faculty-student interaction, and the development of strong analytical and critical thinking skills.

Perspective Option

Students have an opportunity to choose from among a variety of seminars offered that go beyond purely doctrinal analysis to focus in a sustained way on critical and contextualized perspectives on law.  Generally, these seminars introduce students to central themes in one of the special disciplinary approaches to law such as legal sociology, criminology, legal history, feminist legal theory, law and economics, legal philosophy, law and social work, law and anthropology, law and international relations, or other similar disciplines.  These seminars are evaluated by way of a research paper worth at least 75% of the final grade.

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