Sharkdiver

UBC vs U of T (corporate law focus)

45 posts in this topic

15 minutes ago, TheLawStudent said:

So I remember this student writing a really angry article on the UofT newsletter when the admissions committee offered them a spot back after Trump got elected. The whole article was pretty much "I went to Harvard so OBVIOUSLY I could come back if I wanted to because I went to HARVARD, how dare you corrupt corporate stooges try to trick me into coming back". And I all I could remember thinking is 1) this person really wants everyone to know they went to Harvard 2) this person really needs to grow up and not take things so personally. Yes it was not a genuine move but its something all Canadian schools were doing after the Trump election in order to retain high level academic talent. 

 

In short, I would take anything this poster says about UofT with a grain of salt. You went to Harvard, that is great and I admire your achievement, but any Harvard student who is writing angry articles on UofT's newletter because they received a letter reminding them that Canadian schools will always accept applications from top U.S grads is probably not going to give you an unbiased opinion on this school. All in all, it seems they just have a bone to pick with UofT. 

Choose to believe it or not, but you are misidentifying me. I don't think it's very appropriate to attempt to out someone on a forum anyway, but I can assure you I am not that person. It does, however, show that my opinion on U of T is definitely not an outlier among Canadians at Harvard. 

 

Maximumbob raises some good points that I hope to come back to later. 

Edited by Livinginamerica

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems as though the UT v. HYS conversations always neglect to mention that you can go from UT to NY. The only difference is that you have half of the debt load to pay off, making it a significantly better investment. If you can get into Harvard and UT, but are far from confident that you're actually better at school than most people, then go to Harvard. If you've got the confidence to accompany a big law career anyway, go to UT, pay less than half the cost and get the same job. Buying credentials is what you do when you aren't sure that capacity can take you somewhere.

LivingInTrumplandia misses a few other obvious points, too.

1. A great deal of the UT class has no interest in bay. It is not the case that 40% of the students at UT who want a bay job get one. A significant chunk of the remaining students had no interest in that; they wanted to be Supreme Court clerks, boutique litigators, human rights lawyers, "international lawyers", military lawyers, criminal lawyers, "the kind of criminal lawyer who stands for justice, but not one who prosecutes drug users or defends guilty people...", aboriginal law lawyers, civil rights advocates, political operatives, government lawyers, professional dog walkers, etc. It's simply not the case that you're competing with the whole class. 

2. While UT's over-selling itself is without question a grating and unclassy habit, it's not significantly different from the government telling me it's doing a great job, the car salesman telling me the car is perfect for me or my partner telling me she definitely remembered to water the plants this morning. People tell you things that they want you to hear. Somewhere between 10 and 24 years old, you should have figured out that you need to do your own research. As Bob said, if you haven't learned not to take someone advertising at face value by the end of undergrad, then let's all just admit that schools are a pointless waste. 

3. If you do the JD-MBA at UT your chances at a bay job are, I believe, near-100% - low 90s at least. In my year more than half of the kids who came to NY were JD-MBA. The JD-MBA is still cheaper than Harvard.

I'd totally forgotten about that Hahvahd kid who wrote about how very droll it was UT still email advertised to him. I can't decide if paying attention to that email was the least-Hahvahd thing ever or if writing it was the most-UT thing ever. 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, theycancallyouhoju said:

It seems as though the UT v. HYS conversations always neglect to mention that you can go from UT to NY. The only difference is that you have half of the debt load to pay off, making it a significantly better investment. If you can get into Harvard and UT, but are far from confident that you're actually better at school than most people, then go to Harvard. If you've got the confidence to accompany a big law career anyway, go to UT, pay less than half the cost and get the same job. Buying credentials is what you do when you aren't sure that capacity can take you somewhere.

LivingInTrumplandia misses a few other obvious points, too.

1. A great deal of the UT class has no interest in bay. It is not the case that 40% of the students at UT who want a bay job get one. A significant chunk of the remaining students had no interest in that; they wanted to be Supreme Court clerks, boutique litigators, human rights lawyers, "international lawyers", military lawyers, criminal lawyers, "the kind of criminal lawyer who stands for justice, but not one who prosecutes drug users or defends guilty people...", aboriginal law lawyers, civil rights advocates, political operatives, government lawyers, professional dog walkers, etc. It's simply not the case that you're competing with the whole class. 

2. While UT's over-selling itself is without question a grating and unclassy habit, it's not significantly different from the government telling me it's doing a great job, the car salesman telling me the car is perfect for me or my partner telling me she definitely remembered to water the plants this morning. People tell you things that they want you to hear. Somewhere between 10 and 24 years old, you should have figured out that you need to do your own research. As Bob said, if you haven't learned not to take someone advertising at face value by the end of undergrad, then let's all just admit that schools are a pointless waste. 

3. If you do the JD-MBA at UT your chances at a bay job are, I believe, near-100% - low 90s at least. In my year more than half of the kids who came to NY were JD-MBA. The JD-MBA is still cheaper than Harvard.

I'd totally forgotten about that Hahvahd kid who wrote about how very droll it was UT still email advertised to him. I can't decide if paying attention to that email was the least-Hahvahd thing ever or if writing it was the most-UT thing ever. 

Comprehensive list of people that paid full sticker price at Harvard Law: 

Joe Kennedy III, maybe

 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, theycancallyouhoju said:

It seems as though the UT v. HYS conversations always neglect to mention that you can go from UT to NY. The only difference is that you have half of the debt load to pay off, making it a significantly better investment. If you can get into Harvard and UT, but are far from confident that you're actually better at school than most people, then go to Harvard. If you've got the confidence to accompany a big law career anyway, go to UT, pay less than half the cost and get the same job. Buying credentials is what you do when you aren't sure that capacity can take you somewhere.

LivingInTrumplandia misses a few other obvious points, too.

1. A great deal of the UT class has no interest in bay. It is not the case that 40% of the students at UT who want a bay job get one. A significant chunk of the remaining students had no interest in that; they wanted to be Supreme Court clerks, boutique litigators, human rights lawyers, "international lawyers", military lawyers, criminal lawyers, "the kind of criminal lawyer who stands for justice, but not one who prosecutes drug users or defends guilty people...", aboriginal law lawyers, civil rights advocates, political operatives, government lawyers, professional dog walkers, etc. It's simply not the case that you're competing with the whole class. 

2. While UT's over-selling itself is without question a grating and unclassy habit, it's not significantly different from the government telling me it's doing a great job, the car salesman telling me the car is perfect for me or my partner telling me she definitely remembered to water the plants this morning. People tell you things that they want you to hear. Somewhere between 10 and 24 years old, you should have figured out that you need to do your own research. As Bob said, if you haven't learned not to take someone advertising at face value by the end of undergrad, then let's all just admit that schools are a pointless waste. 

3. If you do the JD-MBA at UT your chances at a bay job are, I believe, near-100% - low 90s at least. In my year more than half of the kids who came to NY were JD-MBA. The JD-MBA is still cheaper than Harvard.

I'd totally forgotten about that Hahvahd kid who wrote about how very droll it was UT still email advertised to him. I can't decide if paying attention to that email was the least-Hahvahd thing ever or if writing it was the most-UT thing ever. 

Lol, the butthurt is strong with this one. Then again, this is pretty much the stereotype of U of T students that exists among Canadian at Harvard, many of whom have had U of T students resentful of their success (livingintrumplandia, give me a break with the childishness).

 

To address your substantive points

 

1. This is obviously the case at Harvard as well, and is where I am getting the 95% OCI success rate from. Yes, only about 70-75% of the Harvard class goes biglaw, but of those who do EIP, there is about 95% success rate.

 

2. Honestly, my main complaint is, as I said, people like you who would hold out a NYC job for half the price when you know full well that that is extremely unlikely from U of T. This is the kind of bad advice that needs to be countered. U of T is not in any way equivalent to Harvard in terms of placement, and this is where the trickery and resentment comes in. And there is no predicting law school performance at any school, particularly the top 5% marks you would need at U of T for a shot at NYC.

 

3. Seriously, doing a joint degree for a better OCI success rate chance? Lol, thanks, I'll just do it the simple say, 3 year JD for the same chance as the U of T students who are doing the extra work of a joint degree. I'm out in three, their out in four, and I get the same chances in three. Sounds like a better deal to me. 

 

Also, Harvard gives major financial aid, particularly to Canadians when you account for the exchange rate. We are talking about an effective tuition rate of sometimes around 35-40k USD for a middle class Canadian going to Harvard based on the amount of grant money they will get from the school. Coming with 180k per year jobs? Sounds like a good deal to me.

 

Sorry you couldn't get in man, but try to contain the butthurt a little bit. (Note, I'm not saying this to bash the other U of T students on this thread who have been perfectly civil, just this douchebag).

Edited by Livinginamerica

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Livinginamerica said:

Lol, the butthurt is strong with this one. Then again, this is pretty much the stereotype of U of T students that exists among Canadian at Harvard, many of whom have had U of T students resentful of their success (livingintrumplandia, give me a break with the childishness).

 

To address your substantive points

 

1. This is obviously the case at Harvard as well, and is where I am getting the 95% OCI success rate from. Yes, only about 70-75% of the Harvard class goes biglaw, but of those who do EIP, there is about 95% success rate.

 

2. Honestly, my main complaint is, as I said, people like you who would hold out a NYC job for half the price when you know full well that that is extremely unlikely from U of T. This is the kind of bad advice that needs to be countered. U of T is not in any way equivalent to Harvard in terms of placement, and this is where the trickery and resentment comes in. And there is no predicting law school performance at any school, particularly the top 5% marks you would need at U of T for a shot at NYC.

 

3. Seriously, doing a joint degree for a better OCI success rate chance? Lol, thanks, I'll just do it the simple say, 3 year JD for the same chance as the U of T students who are doing the extra work of a joint degree. I'm out in three, their out in four, and I get the same chances in three. Sounds like a better deal to me. 

 

Also, Harvard gives major financial aid, particularly to Canadians when you account for the exchange rate. We are talking about an effective tuition rate of sometimes around 35-40k USD for a middle class Canadian going to Harvard based on the amount of grant money they will get from the school. Coming with 180k per year jobs? Sounds like a good deal to me.

 

Sorry you couldn't get in man, but try to contain the butthurt a little bit. (Note, I'm not saying this to bash the other U of T students on this thread who have been perfectly civil, just this douchebag).

I didn't apply to H or S, though I was rejected by Y. I turned down the other t14s I was accepted to. Went to UT and landed in NY. Still with the firm. But your condescension is adorable.

1. Then compare apples to apples. You can't say H is 95% success because a few don't want biglaw but then pretend the whole UT class does. My experience was that there were relatively few people who wanted bay and didn't get it. It would be great if UV could try to actually figure out what percentage, though.

2. Again, it's exactly what I did, and it worked fine. As Bob said, if you're confident that you are a better student than most, then there isn't much risk to falling to the bottom 30% of UT. I appreciate that people who aren't very confident about how well they'll do in law school should just go to the place that has the highest placement rate for a gig they want - that makes good sense to me. 

3. I didn't do the MBA - again, it's just buying a higher chance at a job and I felt fine about my chances. But you paid more for a higher chance at a job, so I don't really know why you're laughing at people who did the same. 

Finally, I've been on the other side of the hiring table with my firm. You do not need top 5% marks to get a job in NY. That's just your uninformed guess. I do appreciate the laughs, though.  

Sorry you overpaid, man. 

Edited by theycancallyouhoju
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.