M1995

U of A vs. Osgoode

10 posts in this topic

Without a doubt, Osgoode is by far a better option for me. It is everything I want in a law school, clinics, atmosphere, programs, everything. However, I don't think going to U of A or Osgoode would change where I will work or how I will end up using my law degree, if that makes sense. At least, the difference would not be significant. I just don't know if its worth spending (at least) $50 000 a year at Osgoode, whereas for U of A, all I have to worry about is $15 000/year. 

 

I would also rather go to school without the added stress of being poor, and worrying about being even poorer after graduation - which is what Osgoode would do to me. 

 

Any thoughts on this? 

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Where do you see yourself articling and practicing right after law school?  

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If the difference is 35k a year (105k total), then U of A seems like an obvious choice. 105 thousand dollars of debt is truly a life changing amount of money.

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UofA,  if you want to really go to the market of Toronto and you may aim the firm or company, that has subbranch in province of Alberta and apply an internal transfer afterward. (my bias) 

I might still suggest to go to a cheaper option if that's available.., if you meet a guy or a girl , you would like to get married during or  right after law school. You probably be lesser concern of monetary matter  if Mr. or Mrs. right does show up in time.   ( it's a completely off topic analogy)

Edited by akulamasusu

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2 hours ago, akulamasusu said:

UofA,  if you want to really go to the market of Toronto and you may aim the firm or company, that has subbranch in province of Alberta and apply an internal transfer afterward. (my bias) 

No, don't do that.

If OP winds up going to U of A but wants to get a job in Toronto, he or she should apply for jobs in Toronto.  I generally say it's better to go to school in the city you want to work in, but applying in Toronto from Edmonton is certainly possible.  But there are only a handful of firms that have offices in both provinces.  There are hundreds of other firms in Toronto that the OP could also apply to.

Plus, moving between offices in national firms happens very rarely, even if the OP does get into one of those firms.

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I am aware the sad reality that it's hard for  law students outside of province to break through. However, my personal bias is that.

I really see no reason why people cannot break through other province, unless local law student are too much.. Employer may questions sincerity of distant applicants since people are living really far away. Employer may feel moral guilt to call people fly over from far away to attend recruitment center if they are not more than half of sure they are going to enlist those potential candidates.   Since local law students or lawyers are already flourished and over abundant, distant applicant may need to be exceptional , or else they just employed local ones.

If we inspect from aspect or content of law, I see no reason why students from outside of province cannot break through.  Exclusion of civil law in  Quebec,  does each province has its  own provincial law , or the laws generally look the same? If the law generally look the same, the answer would be obvious that it's other factor to hold outsiders back.?   Some specialty of law such as criminal law , only has only federal rules or  shared law among the provinces. The only difference among provinces  I could identified  is civil procedure. ,  BC and AB also has its own new rule of civil procedures. whereas Ontario has its own rule of civil procedure. Perhaps that are more or minor difference that I fail to pick up. But in term of content of study, I really see no reason why people shall forfeit their light tuition school  with free lodging or accommodation to attend slightly more costly school. (again it's my personal bias. and it all eventually comes down to personal selection)

Besides they are so many stages in life, does one need to go On right away? One can try numerous attempt in life, at age of 30, 35, 40, 45. Does people need to go there right away or first round?

I know in US, each states has different rules. To take  civil code of state of Louisiana as an example, the civil code  looked really different from that of California. . . The civil code of Louisiana completely inherit  the civil code from Germany, which is really different from common laws.  Some other state criminal code look different from that of California criminal code.  Each states also love to create its own system and rule, so it's really harder for other states lawyer to cross the river or break through, which takes lawyers much time to adjust to it. Furthermore, outsiders need to pass licensing process of others' states to be certified lawyers and practices law.

 

Edited by akulamasusu

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Ok I think I may partially get where you're coming from,because I see a thread from "hanshotfirst" 's reply

Quote

 "There are many reasons why attending a school in the city you want to practice in is ideal, but it mostly comes down to saving money and time. The logistics of networking, interviewing for jobs ect. is easier when you already live/go to school in that city,"

Edited by akulamasusu

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11 hours ago, akulamasusu said:

I am aware the sad reality that it's hard for  law students outside of province to break through. However, my personal bias is that.

I really see no reason why people cannot break through other province, unless local law student are too much.. Employer may questions sincerity of distant applicants since people are living really far away. Employer may feel moral guilt to call people fly over from far away to attend recruitment center if they are not more than half of sure they are going to enlist those potential candidates.   Since local law students or lawyers are already flourished and over abundant, distant applicant may need to be exceptional , or else they just employed local ones.

My usual advice on lawstudents.ca is that barring some other significant factor, it is better to go to law school in the city you want to practice in.

 

This isn't though because it's somehow impossible to get a job in a different city though!  Plenty of people (myself included!) do it.  The reason for that advice is that number one, there's no significant difference in the legal education you receive at any Canadian law school.  Going across the country to, say, UBC, isn't going to be an advantage to you if you're from Ontario and want to work in Ontario and could just as easily go to, say, Western.

 

The real advantage to going to law school in the city you want to practice in is more social.  You'll make friends in lawschool - good ones.  If you practice law in the same city those friends will turn into your colleagues.  They can refer you work.  Some of your professors will be local practictioners who you will work with (or against) for years to come.  You'll have many opportunities to meet with local law firms, which is an asset when it comes to applying for jobs.

 

None of those are overwhelming advantages though.  If you can only get into law school at, say, UNB, it's still fine to go.  You'll still get a quality education, and you still stand a decent chance of landing a job anywhere in the country.  It's just that, all other things being equal, it's better to go to school in the place you want to practice in.

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58 minutes ago, Malicious Prosecutor said:

My usual advice on lawstudents.ca is that barring some other significant factor, it is better to go to law school in the city you want to practice in.

The real advantage to going to law school in the city you want to practice in is more social.  You'll make friends in lawschool - good ones.  If you practice law in the same city those friends will turn into your colleagues.  They can refer you work.  Some of your professors will be local practictioners who you will work with (or against) for years to come.  You'll have many opportunities to meet with local law firms, which is an asset when it comes to applying for jobs.

 

I think you make some great points, and now I understand where you're coming from. That's good stuff.

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