Jump to content
Girby

June 2017 LSAT Study Thread

Recommended Posts

Anyone use Kaplan's?

I just bought the Kaplan's LSAT Premier 2016-2017. 

It is really heavy on Theory and very minimal on actual practice questions.

 

Anyone have any experience with this/comments/reviews? 

 

Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone use Kaplan's?

I just bought the Kaplan's LSAT Premier 2016-2017. 

It is really heavy on Theory and very minimal on actual practice questions.

 

Anyone have any experience with this/comments/reviews? 

 

Thank you!

 

I have mixed reviews on Kaplan. I used the books in conjunction with their online course, which was fine in terms of practice material, but I do not like their method for RC. I recommend checking out 7Sage's free resources at the very least to supplement Kaplan, as well as obviously buying books to do complete timed prep tests. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Figured I would join this thread. Started studying at the start of the month, hoping to raise my diagnostic of 156 at least 10 points. I'm currently using a combination of the Powerscore Bibles and the free content on 7sage to study. Contemplating purchasing the basic course from 7sage, but am holding off to see where I sit after working through all three of the bibles. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Figured I would join this thread. Started studying at the start of the month, hoping to raise my diagnostic of 156 at least 10 points. I'm currently using a combination of the Powerscore Bibles and the free content on 7sage to study. Contemplating purchasing the basic course from 7sage, but am holding off to see where I sit after working through all three of the bibles. 

 

People rave about 7sage but I finished about 75% of the curriculum (got the cheapest package) and am about 120 pages into the PowerScore book and so far I think I prefer it more...but that might be because 7sage gave me a good leg to stand on? I love the LG solutions but honestly I'm not sure if I'd use anything else from 7sage just yet, if I were you 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone, 

 

I also just created an account too. Hopefully we can all help eachother out before the June 2017 LSAT. 

 

I've bought the Powerscore trilogy books and am following Powerscore's 6 month study plan (with some flexibility). My question mainly pertains to the other books that complement the bibles (the work books and the question type training books). Has anyone had a chance to look through them and see if they're useful? I've heard mixed things about them. 

 

Thanks!

 

I wouldn't bother with the workbooks, instead you should just buy a crapload of prep tests. 30 of the most modern ones at minimum. You can get 52-71 in two convenient compilation books called 10 New Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests and 10 Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests Volume V. The newest ones you'll have to get separately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey all, 

 

I just finished my Law undergrad at Carleton in Ottawa, I am now looking towards taking the LSAT in June this year. I really don't know much about the LSATs and would like information on the test itself, study patterns, deadlines, prep courses, power score bible and all other beneficial info. I would really appreciate the help.    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ here's a post I made on the matter:

http://lawstudents.ca/forums/topic/46828-the-most-effective-study-practices-for-lsat/?p=631203

 

What I would do differently if I could do it all over again: I bought and did 27 of the most recent preptests, but I should have done even more. I would have bought the Logical Reasoning Bible but skipped the other two; the Logic Games Bible isn't necessarily bad though. It still helped me a lot when I was a total newb, but some of their methods are inferior to 7Sage's (most notably for pure in/out games). I would go with 7Sage for Logic Games instead of Powerscore. 7Sage logic game reviews do not cost you a dime: Simply look up the 7Sage video on YouTube for each logic game after doing a preptest. Erase and re-do the set of logic games using what you've learned from the video.

 

The Reading Comprehension Bible is pretty crap though, this is widely agreed upon. It's hard to say what to do for this section since people find different methods useful. Some people like marking up passages, some don't (like me). I improved on this by simply doing enough of them on preptests and then looking up why I got each question wrong on https://lsathacks.com/explanations/ Eventually I got a better feel for Reading Comprehension passages and questions through endless repetition.

 

Again, I would like to stress the extreme importance of buying and doing as many preptests as possible, and reviewing each preptest after writing so you know exactly why you got each question wrong.

Edited by McSweeney
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks alot, this really helped. 

Edited by jeffy94

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey all, 

 

I just finished my Law undergrad at Carleton in Ottawa, I am now looking towards taking the LSAT in June this year. I really don't know much about the LSATs and would like information on the test itself, study patterns, deadlines, prep courses, power score bible and all other beneficial info. I would really appreciate the help.    

Check out the link below which is about getting the most out of each preptest. The article has six parts; I wish I had read it before paying for my first LSAT prep course. You can also sign up for 7Sage free trial account. The free account gives you access to 7Sage weekly study group and 7Sage online grader. 

 

https://7sage.com/the-blind-review-how-to-correctly-prep-for-lsat-part-1/ 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey guys, 

 

I'm trying to figure out what to do next in terms of LSAT prep. I've been at for two month, started with a diagnostic of 164 before Christmas and now after ~35 prep tests my last three timed pts have been 168, 174 and 176. (LG-0, RC~3, LR~3, LR~2)

 

I have all the powerscore bibles but I haven't touched them. Should I bother at this point? What should I even be doing for the next 3.5 months?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Everyone,

 

I am wondering if someone can give me some guidance on my situation. 

 

I am looking at applying for Law Schools for the December deadline and will be doing so under the "discretionary" or equivalent category for a few law schools, mainly UofO and UBC and perhaps UVic. I have been out of school for 7 years and was an Accounting major who got his designation.

 

So I wanted to know if I have enough time to start prepping for the June LSAT or whether that would be a waste of one of my three attempts? Would it be more prudent to write in September and then December if I need it? Or would it be better to write it in June?

 

Furthermore is anyone who is writing in June following a specific study process? I've seen some prep books but are those fully comprehensive on how to prep and the time it would take? Is anyone taking the courses?

 

Sorry for the many questions but the resources I can find (lsac site and google searches) havent been fully clear on what path is ideal or what books to buy. 

 

Any help is appreciated guys. 

 

Thanks,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ here's a post I made on the matter:

http://lawstudents.ca/forums/topic/46828-the-most-effective-study-practices-for-lsat/?p=631203

 

What I would do differently if I could do it all over again: I bought and did 27 of the most recent preptests, but I should have done even more. I would have bought the Logical Reasoning Bible but skipped the other two; the Logic Games Bible isn't necessarily bad though. It still helped me a lot when I was a total newb, but some of their methods are inferior to 7Sage's (most notably for pure in/out games). I would go with 7Sage for Logic Games instead of Powerscore. 7Sage logic game reviews do not cost you a dime: Simply look up the 7Sage video on YouTube for each logic game after doing a preptest. Erase and re-do the set of logic games using what you've learned from the video.

 

The Reading Comprehension Bible is pretty crap though, this is widely agreed upon. It's hard to say what to do for this section since people find different methods useful. Some people like marking up passages, some don't (like me). I improved on this by simply doing enough of them on preptests and then looking up why I got each question wrong on https://lsathacks.com/explanations/ Eventually I got a better feel for Reading Comprehension passages and questions through endless repetition.

 

Again, I would like to stress the extreme importance of buying and doing as many preptests as possible, and reviewing each preptest after writing so you know exactly why you got each question wrong.

Hey do you mind telling me what your weekly routine was? And when you went from cold to your final score, in terms of how long that was in months?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Everyone,

 

I am wondering if someone can give me some guidance on my situation. 

 

I am looking at applying for Law Schools for the December deadline and will be doing so under the "discretionary" or equivalent category for a few law schools, mainly UofO and UBC and perhaps UVic. I have been out of school for 7 years and was an Accounting major who got his designation.

 

So I wanted to know if I have enough time to start prepping for the June LSAT or whether that would be a waste of one of my three attempts? Would it be more prudent to write in September and then December if I need it? Or would it be better to write it in June?

 

Furthermore is anyone who is writing in June following a specific study process? I've seen some prep books but are those fully comprehensive on how to prep and the time it would take? Is anyone taking the courses?

 

Sorry for the many questions but the resources I can find (lsac site and google searches) havent been fully clear on what path is ideal or what books to buy. 

 

Any help is appreciated guys. 

 

Thanks,

 

Have you done a diagnostic test? I would certainly start on the LSAT now and right it in June. If you score below your PT average the first time you could still rewrite in September/October. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you done a diagnostic test? I would certainly start on the LSAT now and right it in June. If you score below your PT average the first time you could still rewrite in September/October. 

Hey thanks for the reply!

 

No I havent, i was going to write the June 07 test that is available on LSAC and do a rough timed test. 

 

Would you think I should puruse a self a trainer approach or try and do a course?

 

The only issue for me is that I work full time, and want to invest in a course if it is worth the money.

 

Thanks,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey thanks for the reply!

 

No I havent, i was going to write the June 07 test that is available on LSAC and do a rough timed test. 

 

Would you think I should puruse a self a trainer approach or try and do a course?

 

The only issue for me is that I work full time, and want to invest in a course if it is worth the money.

 

Thanks,

 

If I were you I would take the June 07 test as soon as you can. That should give you a feel for what sort of preparation you are going need before going into this test. If you're in the 140s, a course may be something to look into. But if you're in the 150s, considering you have a full time schedule, I would think that self-study and practice would be the way to go. Personally I started very high and I've just been doing as many PTs as I can before test time. You may be the kind of person who gets the test and just needs to practice.

 

And you are a mature student, so that will certainly be taken into account. If you don't mind me asking what are you undergrad stats?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I were you I would take the June 07 test as soon as you can. That should give you a feel for what sort of preparation you are going need before going into this test. If you're in the 140s, a course may be something to look into. But if you're in the 150s, considering you have a full time schedule, I would think that self-study and practice would be the way to go. Personally I started very high and I've just been doing as many PTs as I can before test time. You may be the kind of person who gets the test and just needs to practice.

 

And you are a mature student, so that will certainly be taken into account. If you don't mind me asking what are you undergrad stats?

Well they arent great lol I went to UOttawa which scores it out of 10 not 4. I worked full-time due to some financial obligations with my family in my last two years so my GPA went from a 7.2 in years 1-2 and dropped  to a 6.5 when I graduated. Converted that is between a 3.0 - 3.3. 

 

I spoke with a few reps from Western and UBC along with U Ottawa and it seems like I'm a longshot no matter where I go, I will be posting in the law school specific forums hopefully tomorrow to see if there are discretionary/something along those lines there and the stats of those who have been accepted.

 

I also need to figure out volunteer experience and all that. Lol i'm so new at this that its all been overwhelming and trying to sort it all out.

 

Which schools are you applying/in at the moment?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well they arent great lol I went to UOttawa which scores it out of 10 not 4. I worked full-time due to some financial obligations with my family in my last two years so my GPA went from a 7.2 in years 1-2 and dropped  to a 6.5 when I graduated. Converted that is between a 3.0 - 3.3. 

 

I spoke with a few reps from Western and UBC along with U Ottawa and it seems like I'm a longshot no matter where I go, I will be posting in the law school specific forums hopefully tomorrow to see if there are discretionary/something along those lines there and the stats of those who have been accepted.

 

I also need to figure out volunteer experience and all that. Lol i'm so new at this that its all been overwhelming and trying to sort it all out.

 

Which schools are you applying/in at the moment?

 

I'm in the same boat! My cGPA is a measly ~3.13, with an L2 of ~3.24. Currently my plan is to apply to UBC, Windsor, Lakehead, Western and Dalhousie. We are what you'd call "splitters", it's a term thrown around a lot and it means that you are compensating your low cGPA with a high LSAT score. So for me, my timed PT average is probably around 169+ (96th percentile?) after starting at 164 and banging out around 30 prep tests and I'm consistently doing more practice tests until the June LSAT. 

 

Your situation is a little bit different, although both of us are placing a lot of attention on the LSAT. You're a mature student because you've been out of post-secondary for over five years and you have significant work experience. 

 

Ottawa is very cGPA heavy, although there are a few people who got in with a 3.0 based on special circumstances.

 

UBC drops your lowest 4 classes (half year classes) and looks at a percentage grade.

 

If I were you I'd set aside an afternoon to do a timed LSAT and get a diagnostic score, and then convert your uOttawa GPA to both an OLSAS cGPA and a UBC GPA. With these numbers you'll have a clearer idea of what your options are.

 

The OLSAS scale can be found here:

https://www.ouac.on.ca/guide/olsas-gpa-calculations/

 

Make sure to take each individual grade and convert them individually, and then take the average of all those grades. 

Edited by YemenJemen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in the same boat! My cGPA is a measly ~3.13, with an L2 of ~3.24. Currently my plan is to apply to UBC, Windsor, Lakehead, Western and Dalhousie. We are what you'd call "splitters", it's a term thrown around a lot and it means that you are compensating your low cGPA with a high LSAT score. So for me, my timed PT average is probably around 169+ (96th percentile?) after starting at 164 and banging out around 30 prep tests and I'm consistently doing more practice tests until the June LSAT. 

 

Your situation is a little bit different, although both of us are placing a lot of attention on the LSAT. You're a mature student because you've been out of post-secondary for over five years and you have significant work experience. 

 

Ottawa is very cGPA heavy, although there are a few people who got in with a 3.0 based on special circumstances.

 

UBC drops your lowest 4 classes (half year classes) and looks at a percentage grade.

 

If I were you I'd set aside an afternoon to do a timed LSAT and get a diagnostic score, and then convert your uOttawa GPA to both an OLSAS cGPA and a UBC GPA. With these numbers you'll have a clearer idea of what your options are.

 

The OLSAS scale can be found here:

https://www.ouac.on.ca/guide/olsas-gpa-calculations/

 

Make sure to take each individual grade and convert them individually, and then take the average of all those grades. 

Thanks so much for the response man! Best of luck and I'll keep you in my PM rolodex haha

 

one last question, are the universities you mentioned above the ones favourable for us splitters? Or are those just your desirable locations?

 

I know LSAC site has a calculator where you can put in your scores/grades and it pumps out schools recommended to you but other than that and calling specific schools (of which there arent a lot i know) is there another avenue to find out which schools are GPA heavy vs. LSAT heavy?

 

also do you mind if I ask you some further quesitons via PM?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much for the response man! Best of luck and I'll keep you in my PM rolodex haha

 

one last question, are the universities you mentioned above the ones favourable for us splitters? Or are those just your desirable locations?

 

I know LSAC site has a calculator where you can put in your scores/grades and it pumps out schools recommended to you but other than that and calling specific schools (of which there arent a lot i know) is there another avenue to find out which schools are GPA heavy vs. LSAT heavy?

 

also do you mind if I ask you some further quesitons via PM?

 

No problem! Feel free to PM me any time you want.

 

I've chosen these schools for a variety of reasons, but yes mostly because I think they're favourable to splitters:

 

UBC:

Drops your lowest four grades and looks at percentages, for me that means a decent boost in my average. They also heavily weigh the LSAT and use an index formula in their admissions process. So, you input your UBC GPA into the formula and your LSAT score and you get a number, if that number is high enough you can pretty much bet you'll get admitted.

 

Windsor:

Very Holistic school, they really care about your 'softs' and whether you fit in with their ideology of 'access to justice' and social justice etc. Personally I'm doing research into global inequality and feel that I would fit in. People with our GPAs seem to get admitted somewhat regularly.

 

Western:

Very LSAT heavy, Very L2. I feel I have somewhat OK chances of getting in.

 

Dalhousie:

cGPA or L2, whichever is higher. They also weigh the LSAT at 40%, so given a high enough score you may be able to mitigate. They also hold interviews for candidates so you'll have an oppurtunity to explain yourself and your marks to them.

 

Lakehead:

I'm so unsure about Lakehead. You don't need to article? They don't use OLSAS? It's $300 to apply?! But at the end of the day, for me, I think I have a realistic shot of getting in here and I have the advantage of being from a Northern Ontario community and can (Hopefully) use this to my advantage.

 

One other school that you may not have thought about,

 

Manitoba:

I want to think it's the easiest to get into? Best for splitters? This is a school that drops your lowest 25% of classes and weighs the LSAT very high. They also have their own AGPA system that is very forgiving. My problem with this school is that while I can probably get in fairly easily, I don't know about the likelihood of getting a job outside of Manitoba when I graduate. This is probably my ultimate safety school if I get rejected everywhere else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey do you mind telling me what your weekly routine was? And when you went from cold to your final score, in terms of how long that was in months?

 

I don't remember when I started but it was either June or July 2016. I had a full time job, so I just started reading the Powerscore Bibles (including doing all the activities within them) whenever I could, with very heavy work on the weekends; at times I probably would read for 8 hours straight. After completing the Bibles and moving onto prep tests, I did something like: do a prep test, review it the next day, do another prep test. Once school started in September I had the tremendously difficult task of juggling school, full time job, and LSAT preparation. Needless to say I did very heavy work on the weekends. The week of my LSAT writing in September 2016, I took the week off work and crammed horribly and I really regret it. I sometimes did 2 prep tests + reviews in a single day, because I wanted to finish all of the most modern prep tests before writing. This really burned me out and my prep test scores suffered as a result, dropping from high 150s/low 160s to mid 150s. Although I wasn't sure if this was burnout or if the modern prep tests were just getting more difficult. At any rate, I bombed the actual September LSAT and scored 154. I took a week off doing any LSAT work, and immediately noticed an improvement when I wrote my first post-break prep test (one of the older ones I had skipped because I didn't have time) and scored 162, higher than I had ever scored before. However, I wasn't sure whether this was attributed to my  week-long rest, or if it was because the prep test was a few years old and easier. I finished off the 7 prep tests that I had skipped in the lead up to the December write, as well as re-doing older logic games, making sure not to overdo it this time. The 2nd actual LSAT in December, I scored a miracle 166, higher than I had ever scored in any prep-test. So my total LSAT study experience was about 6 months.

What I would suggest: pace yourself, don't burn out like I did. Once you get to the prep tests, I would recommend a schedule that may look something like: Day 1 write a prep test, Day 2 review it, Day 3 rest. Then write another prep test and repeat the cycle. I don't know if you're set on writing in June, but that may not give you enough time to write the volume of prep tests that I would recommend without burning out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×