Pazerudael

UNB prefers Atlantic residents - but not those from Nova Scotia?

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Taken directly from their FAQ (https://www.unb.ca/fredericton/law/_resources/pdfs/newadmissionsfaq.pdf):

 

Recognizing our strong connection with, and commitment to, the Atlantic region, UNB Law has a regional preference policy, and admits at least 20 students in the first year class from the province of New Brunswick, and at least another 12 from the provinces of Prince Edward Island and from Newfoundland and Labrador. Residence may be determined on the basis of various factors, including where the applicant lived before, during or after attending university, and where the applicant's family lives.

 

I'm a bit confused - why is Nova Scotia not listed?  NS is an Atlantic province, so why doesn't it count?

 

Thanks!

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Obviously, it does. But that was not my question. Is the motive behind the "regional preference" to offer opportunities for those from provinces without a provincial law school in the Atlantic region? It seems misleading to offer "regional preference" when they don't actually prefer applicants from the whole Atlantic region. 

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Is the motive behind the "regional preference" to offer opportunities for those from provinces without a provincial law school in the Atlantic region? 

I think you're right. UNB offers a certain amount of seats to those residents whose provinces do not have a law school in the Atlantic region. I've chatted with med students at Memorial University of Newfoundland who said, "We take their med students, NB takes our law students."  

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The regional preference extends to students without a law school in their home province. I can't be sure, but I've heard from people who go to Dal that they give preference to students from Nova Scotia, so this is likely UNB's way of balancing that out. If/when MUN or UPEI ever get their own law school, UNB's policy would likely change.

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I know this question is a bit unrelated to the topic, but I figured I'd ask it anyways. Does anyone know how UNB deals with applicants who can demonstrate both an Atlantic and non-Atlantic connection? I, for example, went to university in NL, and have family there, but I was born and raised in BC. Would the admissions department label me an Atlantic resident, and thus consider my application solely in that regard? Or if my stats were too low to get me accepted in the Atlantic category would they switch over and consider me a non-Atlantic resident to see if my stats were good enough to get me admitted in that category? 

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I know this question is a bit unrelated to the topic, but I figured I'd ask it anyways. Does anyone know how UNB deals with applicants who can demonstrate both an Atlantic and non-Atlantic connection? I, for example, went to university in NL, and have family there, but I was born and raised in BC. Would the admissions department label me an Atlantic resident, and thus consider my application solely in that regard? Or if my stats were too low to get me accepted in the Atlantic category would they switch over and consider me a non-Atlantic resident to see if my stats were good enough to get me admitted in that category?

 

I believe they base it on where you went to highschool.

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I believe they base it on where you went to highschool.

 

 

But they don't know where I went to high school 

Edited by howdydo

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MUN transcripts (used to?) indicate on the first page the "basis for admission" - if you were a Newfoundland resident, it would indicate "Newfoundland Level IV" (grade 12) as basis for admission. If you come from out of province, it would indicate something else. 

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I think you're right. UNB offers a certain amount of seats to those residents whose provinces do not have a law school in the Atlantic region. I've chatted with med students at Memorial University of Newfoundland who said, "We take their med students, NB takes our law students."  

 

There are reciprocity agreements in place that reserve a certain number of seats each year for students from a particular province. It's meant to ensure that students from a province that lacks a school still have the opportunity to study in that field and sort of ensures a pipeline of qualified professionals enter the field in the province without the province having to pony up and open a school of its own.

 

MUN med reserves seats for NB students, UNB Law reserves seats for NL students. NL also has 2 seats at the University of Saskatchewan, or at least they used to.

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But they don't know where I went to high school

UNB, like most schools, determines your residency based solely on the home mailing address you provide in your application.

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I'm from NS and I was accepted last year. LSAT 160, GPA 3.6/4.3 (with drops). 

Edited by pateyhfx

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I'm from NS and I was accepted last year. LSAT 160, GPA 3.6/4.3 (with drops). 

 

 

.........

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