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Pazerudael

Chances? (Applying 2017/2018) (3.4 - 3.6/4.3 GPA, 155 LSAT)

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Applying for Fall 2017 with strong work experience (4+ years taken between 3rd and 4th year) and a 3.4 GPA (2.9 first three years, and a 4.2 final year), but only a 155 LSAT. (Total of 3.4/4.3, 155 LSAT)

 

Chances of getting in Fall 2017?

 

Failing that, applying next year. Will be retaking LSAT next September but for estimation purposes: Fall 2018, 3.6/4.3 GPA, 155 LSAT.

 

(GPA adjusted to drop worst 25% of grades.)

 

Thank you for your time. 

 

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Where are you from? UNB favors admission to New Brunswick/Maritime residents, so if you happen to be from NB, your chances might be higher than OOP.

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Where are you from? UNB favors admission to New Brunswick/Maritime residents, so if you happen to be from NB, your chances might be higher than OOP.

I'm at the U of A, and 'technically' a BC resident, so I definitely don't have the residential perk. Thanks for your response!

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I believe the average LSAT score of UNB's admissions is 159, so a 155 is still in the ballpark. I know of a few students in my class who were well below the average on LSAT and got in (they had fantastic GPAs to make up for it) but the admission came late in the cycle. As in August late. And one of which for sure was an non-Atlantic student.

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I believe the average LSAT score of UNB's admissions is 159, so a 155 is still in the ballpark. I know of a few students in my class who were well below the average on LSAT and got in (they had fantastic GPAs to make up for it) but the admission came late in the cycle. As in August late. And one of which for sure was an non-Atlantic student.

Oh, lovely! I'll consider it a great honour and a privilege if I manage to get in with my current score. Of course, I will not be surprised if I do not.  Do you have any idea what my chances would be if I had a 160? 

 

Many thanks for your response and your time! :)

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You said you have some work experience and some time in between yr 3 and 4.

 

While your stats do not scream "instant admission", if you can convince the admissions committee that your work experience has allowed you to mature and develop skills that will allow you to excel in law school and as a lawyer, you might have a shot. You said there was a big jump in your GPA, see if you can draw a correlation between that jump and your work experiences.

 

In terms of your 160, while a 5 point jump is possible, you shouldn’t count on it, and you’re really not doing yourself any favours having people speculate on your chances of admission based on an LSAT score you do not have.

 

 

I would suggest you focus on your work experience in order to set yourself apart from other candidates. If you have the time, trying to improve your LSAT will not hurt, but don’t count on it; there would be more value added in a really strong personal statement and recommendation letters (not required for UNB but they will consider them)

 

 

Good luck!

 

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You said you have some work experience and some time in between yr 3 and 4.

 

While your stats do not scream "instant admission", if you can convince the admissions committee that your work experience has allowed you to mature and develop skills that will allow you to excel in law school and as a lawyer, you might have a shot. You said there was a big jump in your GPA, see if you can draw a correlation between that jump and your work experiences.

 

 

In terms of your 160, while a 5 point jump is possible, you shouldn’t count on it, and you’re really not doing yourself any favours having people speculate on your chances of admission based on an LSAT score you do not have.

 

 

 

I would suggest you focus on your work experience in order to set yourself apart from other candidates. If you have the time, trying to improve your LSAT will not hurt, but don’t count on it; there would be more value added in a really strong personal statement and recommendation letters (not required for UNB but they will consider them)

 

 

 

Good luck!

Thank you for your recommendations! I actually never really considered tying in how work influenced the jump in my academic performance, and how what I did has made me into a better law student/lawyer candidate. 

 

The reason I ask about the 160 score is because on my PTs I was consistently scoring between 159 - 168 - I ended up suffering extremely painful health issues on the day of the exam which I believe directly impacted my score. I have no doubts that my score will be at LEAST a 160 when I retake it next September - given that I will also be studying even more prior to the test. 

 

I appreciate the time you took in responding to my concerns. :)

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I believe the average LSAT score of UNB's admissions is 159, so a 155 is still in the ballpark. I know of a few students in my class who were well below the average on LSAT and got in (they had fantastic GPAs to make up for it) but the admission came late in the cycle. As in August late. And one of which for sure was an non-Atlantic student.

 

Average is a 3.7/4.3 with drops and a 158 LSAT. So, she isn't too far off! 

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So, as i've been saying to you OP, you actually have a much better shot than it may seem given your upward trend and your work experience :) 

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You said you have some work experience and some time in between yr 3 and 4.

 

While your stats do not scream "instant admission", if you can convince the admissions committee that your work experience has allowed you to mature and develop skills that will allow you to excel in law school and as a lawyer, you might have a shot. You said there was a big jump in your GPA, see if you can draw a correlation between that jump and your work experiences.

 

 

In terms of your 160, while a 5 point jump is possible, you shouldn’t count on it, and you’re really not doing yourself any favours having people speculate on your chances of admission based on an LSAT score you do not have.

 

 

 

I would suggest you focus on your work experience in order to set yourself apart from other candidates. If you have the time, trying to improve your LSAT will not hurt, but don’t count on it; there would be more value added in a really strong personal statement and recommendation letters (not required for UNB but they will consider them)

 

 

 

Good luck!

Also I have no idea why you said "a five point just is possible" as if 5 points is literally not a joke. I have improved over 20 from my original diagnostic in not a lot of time... Just rewrite and get a 160 OP.

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So, as i've been saying to you OP, you actually have a much better shot than it may seem given your upward trend and your work experience :)

^_^ Much appreciated! You guys all rock. 

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Thank you for your recommendations! I actually never really considered tying in how work influenced the jump in my academic performance, and how what I did has made me into a better law student/lawyer candidate. 

 

The reason I ask about the 160 score is because on my PTs I was consistently scoring between 159 - 168 - I ended up suffering extremely painful health issues on the day of the exam which I believe directly impacted my score. I have no doubts that my score will be at LEAST a 160 when I retake it next September - given that I will also be studying even more prior to the test. 

 

I appreciate the time you took in responding to my concerns. :)

No problem at all. Regarding your LSAT, that is certainly unfortunate. You should feel confident going in next time as you still performed decently despite considerable aggravating circumstances. Good luck!

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