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Questions about dual JD Windsor

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Hi guys so I had a few questions about the dual JD program at Windsor. My LSAT and gpa are anything but stellar. I have a 157 LSAT and a 3.3 cgpa and I believe 3.5gpa (OSLAS) in my final two years. I am considering applying to the dual JD program after reading that it is easier to get into as I don't want to take a break year and am also fortunate enough to be able to afford a higher tuition. So my questions are:

 

1) Is it really easier to get into dual JD? Can I apply to both JD and dual JD? Also, do you think that I'd be able to get in with my stats?

2) How much more expensive is it?

3) Does it take longer to complete a dual JD?

4) Does the program all take place in Windsor or do I have to travel to the other school at some point?

 

Thank you.

 

 

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I don't want this post to come off as just applying to dual JD incase I don't get in anywhere else. I am applying to some American law schools as they have peaked my interest. This just seems like a perfect opportunity to not just be able to stay in Canada but also dabble in the US.

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1) I wouldn't say it's "easier" to get into the Dual Program, but they take a more "holistic approach" and place greater emphasis on your personal statement and your experiences then most schools. There's some students who have gotten into the program with similar stats (atleast from my year). 

 

2) It's a pretty penny, about $17,000 per year http://www.uwindsor.ca/law/571/tuition-questions.

 

3) It's 3 years like any other JD Program, however, you have two required courses during the summer after 1st year which eats up two months, so you still have two months off. 

 

4) You will be back and fourth between both schools. 

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1) I wouldn't say it's "easier" to get into the Dual Program, but they take a more "holistic approach" and place greater emphasis on your personal statement and your experiences then most schools. There's some students who have gotten into the program with similar stats (atleast from my year). 

 

2) It's a pretty penny, about $17,000 per year http://www.uwindsor.ca/law/571/tuition-questions.

 

3) It's 3 years like any other JD Program, however, you have two required courses during the summer after 1st year which eats up two months, so you still have two months off. 

 

4) You will be back and fourth between both schools. 

I just want to correct you on the cost. Students in the dual JD program have to pay Windsor's tuition each year, which is $17,693 Cdn, plus Detroit's tuition each year, which is $23,173 USD (approximately $30,800 Cdn as of today). This means your tuition for one year would be $48,493 Cdn for one year, compared with only $17,693 for the single JD program. At the end of three years students in the dual JD program would have paid approximately $145,000 Cdn in total tuition, compared with students in the single JD program who would have paid approximately $53,000 in total tuition. 

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Nice catch! Forgot to include the UDM side. 

 

I just want to correct you on the cost. Students in the dual JD program have to pay Windsor's tuition each year, which is $17,693 Cdn, plus Detroit's tuition each year, which is $23,173 USD (approximately $30,800 Cdn as of today). This means your tuition for one year would be $48,493 Cdn for one year, compared with only $17,693 for the single JD program. At the end of three years students in the dual JD program would have paid approximately $145,000 Cdn in total tuition, compared with students in the single JD program who would have paid approximately $53,000 in total tuition. 

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I just want to correct you on the cost. Students in the dual JD program have to pay Windsor's tuition each year, which is $17,693 Cdn, plus Detroit's tuition each year, which is $23,173 USD (approximately $30,800 Cdn as of today). This means your tuition for one year would be $48,493 Cdn for one year, compared with only $17,693 for the single JD program. At the end of three years students in the dual JD program would have paid approximately $145,000 Cdn in total tuition, compared with students in the single JD program who would have paid approximately $53,000 in total tuition. 

 

 $48,493 Cdn for one year! This is more than my entire law school tuition 2009-2012. A lot more!

 

Are there years you spend entirely at one school? (e.g. Do you spend 1L at Windsor, 2L at UDM, and 3L at both, or is it back and forth between both programs all throughout law school?)

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Unfortunately it is very expensive, although technically speaking, you get a 'discount' on the UDM side compared to what single JD UDM students pay. There's also tons of financial aid which is nice but it's still extremely expensive. Each year you're required to take courses on both sides, although you can sometimes get away with doing a full semester at just one or the other school, because our required Dual courses satisfies this requirement. 

Edited by CanadianJD27

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Unfortunately it is very expensive, although technically speaking, you get a 'discount' on the UDM side compared to what single JD UDM students pay. There's also tons of financial aid which is nice but it's still extremely expensive. Each year you're required to take courses on both sides, although you can sometimes get away with doing a full semester at just one or the other school, because our required Dual courses satisfies this requirement. 

 

Steal of a deal!

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