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onlyangelshavewinks

Chances as U.S. Applicant

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Hi everyone, I'm considering applying to U of T from the United States and I really have no idea what to expect. I'll be applying to lots of US T14 law schools, and I feel I have a good handle on their admissions process but much less so when it comes to Canada. The outcome on November 8 may or may not influence my decision about what country to go to school/live in. 

 

When calculating GPA from my best 3 years (as I hear one is supposed to do for Canadian law schools), I arrive at a number in the 3.94-3.97 range. I have taken the LSAT once, with a score of 174 (+-1). I am wondering whether I will be significantly disadvantaged as an international applicant, or if my numbers alone put me in a good spot admissions-wise. I'm assuming my personal statement will have to be extra-stellar, having never lived in Canada. 

 

Thanks for any help!

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you need to use the OLSAS translation scale for your GPA. If it does end up at a similar number (calculate your CGPA as well as your B3) and you have a firm 174 LSAT score (i'm not sure what the +-1 means) you have a very solid, if not certain, chance at admission to U of T.

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I have to ask, as an American who has never lived in this country, what is the appeal of paying close to 47K per year for a UofT JD?

 

Couldn't you take a merit scholarship at a T14 and pay a fraction of that price for a degree that is more marketable in the US?

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I have to ask, as an American who has never lived in this country, what is the appeal of paying close to 47K per year for a UofT JD?

 

Couldn't you take a merit scholarship at a T14 and pay a fraction of that price for a degree that is more marketable in the US?

Canadian fiancee + really love Canada from the weeks I've spent there. We're going to have to be making some consequential decisions about where to end up, and the option of U of T will be worth the application fee, I think.

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Canadian fiancee + really love Canada from the weeks I've spent there. We're going to have to be making some consequential decisions about where to end up, and the option of U of T will be worth the application fee, I think.

 

With those numbers, you will almost certainly get in. I would make mention, if briefly, in your personal statement of why you want to live in Toronto/Canada since it likely won't be immediately apparent.

 

Also, if you and your fiancee meet the common law marriage requirements, you will qualify for domestic tuition at UoT.

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We have identical stats and I was accepted from a v small program in the States that I was sure no one at U of T had heard of

Edited by bud

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You shouldn't go to U of T. It doesn't make any sense for you. Don't get me wrong. It's a great school but with those stats you will probably get a near full ride at some T14s and HYS is in play. (I'm assuming your cumulative GPA is close to your b3 GPA). Seriously, unless you are dead set on practicing in Canada, don't go to U of T.

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There's someone in my year at U of T who is American, went to undergrad in the states, who hadn't lived in Canada before coming to law school, and they got in. Like others have said maybe explain why you want to come here in your PS, but if you don't get in with numbers like that I'd be surprised.

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