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Answers to Winnipeg questions!


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#1 Radche

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 01:14 PM

I won't be attending Robson Hall, but I did do my undergrad at UofM, so if anyone has general questions about the university, or the city itself, feel free to shoot me a message!

Congratulations to everyone who's gotten in, and good luck to those still waiting!

#2 stevesteve

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 01:30 PM

Whats the best place to live for u of m students? What is reasonable rent for the city? Is it a fun place to live?

#3 Radche

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 03:01 PM

The best description I've ever heard for Winnipeg is that the city feels like one big small-town.

 

In terms of best place to live, and rent, there are going to be a number of factors that go into your decision making. Are you going to be living alone? with a roommate? What kind of area, and living conditions, do you want to live in? My general rule is that if you can live alone in an area that you like for less than $1000/month, you've probably got a good deal. Anyone who wants to chip in on rent opinions, please do.

 

In terms of the areas themselves, the campus is located in the very southern part of the city, and the easiest way to get there (if you don't live reasonably close) by transit is by going through downtown. So if you're a student that wants to stay close to campus and not deal with that, obviously somewhere in southern Winnipeg would be your ideal spot. Residence is also an option, but I didn't stay in res. so I don't know much about it.

 

If you're looking to stay on the main transit route, as well as be in a "happening" area, Osborne Village is the popular area, and is very easy to bus to campus from. Parking can be more of a hassle.

 

If you're driving, then the good news is that the campus is, at max, a 30-40 minute drive (in busy traffic) from essentially everywhere in the city.

 

In terms of the city being fun, it's going to all depend on what you put into it. There are professional sporting events all year round that you can go and see, at virtually every price point, between the Winnipeg Jets & Manitoba Moose (NHL and AHL hockey), the Blue Bombers (CFL football), and the Goldeyes (American Association Baseball). In the summer there are festivals of all kinds, ranging from Jazz Fest, Fringe Fest, Folklorama, Folk Fest, etc. but naturally, these don't happen in the frigid winters, outside of the Festival Du Voyageur.

 

As mentioned above, Osborne Village is primarily younger residents, but the Exchange District is another area that's popular for university students in terms of diverse food, bars, etc.

 

If you're into nightclubs, you may be out of luck. There are only a dozen or so real clubs in the city, and rarely do they operate past 2am on the weekends, but there are pubs and such that you can go to virtually any night of the week, if that's your thing.

 

Of course there's also the usual stuff you can do, like movies, archery, bowling, go karting, laser tag, mini-golf, etc, and enough green space in and around the city that you can go to if you're an outdoor person.

 

Just keep in mind that Winnipeg's population hovers around 700 000, and that it gets VERY cold in the winters sometimes (-30 isn't uncommon in the slightest), and that the city is going to give back whatever you put into it. I'll end this long post by saying that people that aren't from the city often remark on how nice everyone is, but I can't really confirm or deny that.

 

Hope this helped!



#4 stevesteve

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 07:30 AM

Thanks, also what is public transit like? Does bussing in the winter often mean standing outside for like half an hour? Or do they at least try to follow a schedule

#5 Radche

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 01:48 PM

Thanks, also what is public transit like? Does bussing in the winter often mean standing outside for like half an hour? Or do they at least try to follow a schedule


The busses try and follow a schedule, but it's not unheard of to be left standing out in the cold for longer than you should be.

Your bussing experience is going to vary, also, depending on when you're using the bus. There are more busses running during peak hours than say, 11pm. Also, not all routes run around the clock. You may be stuck taking a cab if it's 2am and your bus route isn't going anymore.

#6 jaberry

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Posted 26 June 2016 - 07:28 PM

Do you have some areas/buildings to recommend looking at for renting? 



#7 Radche

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Posted 26 June 2016 - 08:16 PM

Do you have some areas/buildings to recommend looking at for renting?


Building specifically no, sorry! In terms of area, it all depends on what you want to be close to (kind of talked about that earlier).

#8 PatrickBateman

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Posted 06 July 2016 - 08:15 PM

I remember from my first year that the majority of out of province/town students stayed either on campus or nearby. After first year, some of them (well, the ones who liked to party/drink more) decided to move to Osborne, whereas the quieter ones remained on campus or nearby.

 

I do not recommend you live downtown, including the exchange, because of the distance to campus and the fact that the majority of your classmates will be near campus.


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#9 MaximumPenetration

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Posted 07 July 2016 - 02:24 PM

Reminder that the U-Pass is approved so bus passes don't need to be purchased (everyone pays $130 as part of tuition fees - overall saves $150 per semester for people using transit as main form of transportation), which makes Osborne/downtown more viable since housing is cheaper down there and often comes fully furnished and includes all utilities.



#10 earthman

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Posted 04 August 2016 - 12:38 PM

As for areas of the city, a lot of people seem to have an aversion to downtown and the Exchange (or anything north) because they're seen as a little scuzzier. I've always lived downtown and in Osborne, and I've never had an issue. You will see panhandlers and homeless people, and every now and then there's some kind of violent incident, but it's really not as bad as people in the suburbs make it out to be. I'm a tall dude, though, so I recognize I might not be getting hassled because of that.

 

I live in the Exchange now, which is pretty much the heart of downtown, and I don't find the transit commute too bad. It's about a ten minute walk to get to a stop, and only about 20 minutes to get to school (sometimes slower, sometimes faster). It's one bus. Getting back can take a little longer if it's around rush hour. It would definitely eat up less of your day to live closer to campus (like in res or on Pembina somewhere), but if you like to get out and do stuff, I personally wouldn't. That area can be kind of a pain to get to in the evening, and most of the fun stuff is more central. 

 

Rent really depends on where you're looking. In my experience, the $1000 for a one bedroom Radche suggested seems a little high, but I also haven't looked in a couple years and don't generally seek out the newest and nicest places anyway. My one bedroom is about $650, and I'd say that centrally (the Exchange, downtown, West Broadway, even Osborne), the average for a one bedroom is probably in the $750-$900 range.