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Current 1L Dual. Ask me (almost) anything.


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#26 tyrion

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Posted 30 June 2016 - 05:36 PM

1. Does wind mobile work well around the University of Windsor and Mercy Law premises?
2. Are the dual degree grades curved based on dual degree class only (especially for 1st year courses)?

#27 dual2018

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 08:31 AM

1. I'm not sure
2. Yes

#28 tyrion

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 01:38 PM

1. I'm not sure
2. Yes


Thanks! Your info is appreciated.

#29 CanadianJD27

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Posted 07 July 2016 - 11:47 AM

1. Yes, Wind works perfectly in Windsor/Detroit. When in Windsor you're so close to Detroit that you can catch AT&T. That being said if you're on another provider, doesn't make any sense to switch. I can catch Canadian signal from UDM in almost any part of the building. 

 

2. All of your classes at UDM, whether Dual or electives, are curved. Typically you can expect a 0.3-0.4 jump in your UDM GPA and then that higher GPA is converted into a percentage. For non-Dual required classes there isn't any jump. So for instance, if you receive 3.0 in a required Dual class at UDM, whatever Windsor's equivalent of a 3.3/3.4 is what gets reported on your Windsor transcript. Windsor classes (required or non-required) are curved as well but there is no "boost." Whatever your grade is after the curve that's what your grade is.

 



#30 tyrion

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Posted 08 July 2016 - 02:27 PM

1. Yes, Wind works perfectly in Windsor/Detroit. When in Windsor you're so close to Detroit that you can catch AT&T. That being said if you're on another provider, doesn't make any sense to switch. I can catch Canadian signal from UDM in almost any part of the building.

2. All of your classes at UDM, whether Dual or electives, are curved. Typically you can expect a 0.3-0.4 jump in your UDM GPA and then that higher GPA is converted into a percentage. For non-Dual required classes there isn't any jump. So for instance, if you receive 3.0 in a required Dual class at UDM, whatever Windsor's equivalent of a 3.3/3.4 is what gets reported on your Windsor transcript. Windsor classes (required or non-required) are curved as well but there is no "boost." Whatever your grade is after the curve that's what your grade is.


Thanks for the detailed answer.

#31 tjml

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 07:55 AM

How is the schedule for the dual program for first and second year dual jd students. Are you required to take civil procedure ?

#32 Dual1720

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 02:50 PM

How is the schedule for the dual program for first and second year dual jd students. Are you required to take civil procedure ?

 

Both US and CDN Civil Procedure are required courses. You take US Civ Pro in your 1L summer, and CDN Civ Pro in 2L. Ours was in the Fall of 2L



#33 tyrion

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 09:06 AM

Do dual 1L courses have assignments and midterms (on top of finals)? Do they have full-year courses instead of semester courses in the first year?

#34 Dual1720

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 03:30 PM

Do dual 1L courses have assignments and midterms (on top of finals)? Do they have full-year courses instead of semester courses in the first year?

Generally, the only class with assignments will be legal writing (ALTA). There are some courses, depending on the prof, that may have an optional essay (taking percentage away from your final exam.. you still write the same full-length exam, though). First year, all courses are full-year. Midterms in December, final exams in April. Midterms weight vs. final exam weight varies with each course (ranges from 20% midterm to 40% midterm depending). 



#35 yella123

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Posted 20 July 2016 - 09:27 PM

Hello,

I am in the process of applying for a student line of credit to help w tuition  yet the bank has asked for a letter indicating that i have accepted my offer at windsor. I called Windsor and they said i can request for a "Certificate of enrollment" on UWindsor but the person was not helpful as she refused to tell me how i go about doing. Could someone please help me and list the steps!!!!!



#36 CanadianJD27

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 01:23 PM

Hi Yella, 

 

If you log into your myuwindsor account, on the top of the screen select the "Academics" Tab. Once you get to that page, on the left side scroll down to "Enrolment Certificate." Forward that and you're good to go.



#37 lawapplicant2015

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Posted 04 August 2016 - 04:57 PM

Hi Yella, 

 

If you log into your myuwindsor account, on the top of the screen select the "Academics" Tab. Once you get to that page, on the left side scroll down to "Enrolment Certificate." Forward that and you're good to go.

I don' think this is an option in your first year.



#38 tyrion

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 12:56 PM

Do they give out cans in the school clubs?



#39 Dual1720

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 12:51 PM

Do they give out cans in the school clubs?

 

if you're nice to us :D 



#40 auroraborealis

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Posted 30 October 2016 - 08:36 PM

I know that we'd need a study permit/student visa to legally go to university in the States. How long does it take for the visa to be processed and for you to receive it?



#41 CanadianJD27

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Posted 22 November 2016 - 09:00 PM

I know that we'd need a study permit/student visa to legally go to university in the States. How long does it take for the visa to be processed and for you to receive it?

 

The schools take care of it, you don't have to worry about it at all. If you are serious about pursuing the Dual program, I'd considering getting a Nexus pass asap. If you don't have one/don't know what it is, it's a special document (looks similar to a driver's license) which drastically speeds up US/Canada border crossing times, by allowing you to pass through reserved Nexus lanes at land crossings and at the airport. In addition, since they interview and do a background check on you before receiving the card, you're considered a much "lower risk" traveller, so the questioning is a lot easier and simpler at the border. Everyone in the Dual program has one, and it saves so much time at the border. The only down side is that because we also get an F-1 Student Visa, you're required to carry that paper with you and your actual passport at all times, but you still get to fly through the reserved Nexus lane, assuming everyone in your car has a Nexus pass. You can find more info here: http://www.cbsa-asfc...s/menu-eng.html


Edited by CanadianJD27, 22 November 2016 - 09:01 PM.


#42 JohnP

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Posted 25 November 2016 - 02:27 PM

Why on earth would you do the dual program at Windsor? It costs a fortune and Detroit is ranked so low that it doesn't even make US News ranking of law schools.



#43 CanadianJD27

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Posted 26 November 2016 - 12:26 PM

Why on earth would you do the dual program at Windsor? It costs a fortune and Detroit is ranked so low that it doesn't even make US News ranking of law schools.

 

Considering 30-40% of the class (more than the single JD program) managed to land Summer OCI & Articling positions at the biggest Bay Street firms with $1,500/week salary, and some even landing at prestigious Michigan firms who's pay is in excess of $3,000 USD/week, seems like financially it was a smart bet. Other students landed positions at other equally prestigious firms in Toronto, Calgary, and elsewhere, and some are going to be clerking for judges or working for the government. Furthermore, almost everyone has secured an Articling position from my class, yet it is not even December (note: I have many friends at Western, Osgoode, U of T, Queens, and elsewhere who have not been so fortunate). This, in addition to the many wonderful "hands-on" type experiences such as Moot Court competitions at Oxford University and in New York, externship and clinical opportunities which are second to none - safe to say the Dual Program was a safe bet. So as much as I appreciate your elitism and candour (probably coming from someone who hasn't even been admitted to law school), you should probably take it elsewhere. 


Edited by CanadianJD27, 26 November 2016 - 12:29 PM.

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#44 DenningsSkiTrip

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Posted 26 November 2016 - 01:41 PM


Considering 30-40% of the class (more than the single JD program) managed to land Summer OCI & Articling positions at the biggest Bay Street firms with $1,500/week salary, and some even landing at prestigious Michigan firms who's pay is in excess of $3,000 USD/week, seems like financially it was a smart bet. Other students landed positions at other equally prestigious firms in Toronto, Calgary, and elsewhere, and some are going to be clerking for judges or working for the government. Furthermore, almost everyone has secured an Articling position from my class, yet it is not even December (note: I have many friends at Western, Osgoode, U of T, Queens, and elsewhere who have not been so fortunate). This, in addition to the many wonderful "hands-on" type experiences such as Moot Court competitions at Oxford University and in New York, externship and clinical opportunities which are second to none - safe to say the Dual Program was a safe bet. So as much as I appreciate your elitism and candour (probably coming from someone who hasn't even been admitted to law school), you should probably take it elsewhere. 

 

 

I get wanting to defend your school, and nothing against Windsor, I know some fantastic people who went there who are now very successful, but what you posted here is completely inaccurate. In essence you're saying that the dual students at Windsor have the highest employment stats in the country! While 50% or so of the U of T class winds up on Bay Street, not all of those people are at "the biggest Bay Street firms", and if we go off of what you're saying we can assume that the dual students at Windsor do as well on Bay Street as the U of T class does? Get real, the last two years have been banner years for Windsor with respect to Bay Street hiring and they have hired 30 ish people out of classes of 250 each year, and not all of those 30 people per year have landed at the "largest Bay Street firms". So I guess we are to assume that the majority of Bay Street hires from Windsor come from the dual program? I would have to see some actual data on that, it sounds pretty dubious. As far as landing "equally prestigious positions" in Calgary and elsewhere, sure, a few people might have landed in good positions in other markets, but the stats are what they are and again, that isn't happening in droves.

 

The fact of the matter is that while plenty of people from Windsor do just fine, it is one of the Ontario schools (along with Ottawa where the guy you're responding to goes) that presents people with a risk when they decide to go there. If you want to make it to Bay Street from Windsor you had better be on the deans list, which is no small task as there are some very talented people at the top of the class at both of those schools. And while you are saying things are all fine and dandy for everybody, the chatter I am hearing when I speak to people who go to those schools is that it is difficult out there for them (not that it isn't difficult for all of us), and they feel that the market is oversaturated. 

 

I think a more accurate response would have been that yes, the program presents a risk, and you had better work hard and do well while you are in it, but that several people in the program do navigate it successfully. This isn't elitism on my part, it is a reasoned analysis of the facts. 


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#45 CanadianJD27

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Posted 26 November 2016 - 07:44 PM

I hear what you're saying, and I can appreciate your opinion, even if we disagree. On that note, unfortunately, I cannot offer you raw data regarding where students placed, however, as we are very small group, we can all attest to who is going where and what not. If you're really curious though, Career Services at Windsor Law keeps track of this information - by all means feel free to contact them. 

 

Forgive me if I come across overtly direct, but, on a yearly basis, I see non-Dual students joining these Dual threads to give their two cents about the program - one which they've never set food in. Out of curiosity, as a non-Dual or non-Windsor student (your post seems to suggest U of T but I'm not sure) what brought you to this thread? Did you perhaps transfer from the Dual Program or do you have any experience here or merely anecdotal thoughts? This seems to be a recurring theme and I genuinely feel really sorry for the original author of this thread and interested students in the program.

 

Best of luck in your exams - I'll leave you with the last word. 


Edited by CanadianJD27, 26 November 2016 - 07:46 PM.


#46 DenningsSkiTrip

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Posted 27 November 2016 - 10:59 AM

I hear what you're saying, and I can appreciate your opinion, even if we disagree. On that note, unfortunately, I cannot offer you raw data regarding where students placed, however, as we are very small group, we can all attest to who is going where and what not. If you're really curious though, Career Services at Windsor Law keeps track of this information - by all means feel free to contact them.

Forgive me if I come across overtly direct, but, on a yearly basis, I see non-Dual students joining these Dual threads to give their two cents about the program - one which they've never set food in. Out of curiosity, as a non-Dual or non-Windsor student (your post seems to suggest U of T but I'm not sure) what brought you to this thread? Did you perhaps transfer from the Dual Program or do you have any experience here or merely anecdotal thoughts? This seems to be a recurring theme and I genuinely feel really sorry for the original author of this thread and interested students in the program.

Best of luck in your exams - I'll leave you with the last word.


I'm only here to address the misinformation in your post. A student enrolling in the dual program at Windsor does not have a 30-40% chance at a job with one of the biggest Bay Street firms. In reality only 12% of the Windsor class lands on Bay Street in some capacity, and less than that land at the "biggest Bay Street firms". There is no demonstrable reason why a dual student would outperform the rest of the group when it comes to recruiting.

Again, I understand why you would want to defend your school against someone who said something obnoxious about it, but posting misleading information that may be relied on isn't helping prospective students. Keep in mind that those enrolling in the dual program are overwhelmingly those who don't have other Canadian JD options, and in many cases are people who will take on a lot of debt to complete the program. They have a right to know what the employment prospects actually are before they take on that burden.
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#47 JohnP

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Posted 27 November 2016 - 06:09 PM

Considering 30-40% of the class (more than the single JD program) managed to land Summer OCI & Articling positions at the biggest Bay Street firms with $1,500/week salary, and some even landing at prestigious Michigan firms who's pay is in excess of $3,000 USD/week, seems like financially it was a smart bet. Other students landed positions at other equally prestigious firms in Toronto, Calgary, and elsewhere, and some are going to be clerking for judges or working for the government. Furthermore, almost everyone has secured an Articling position from my class, yet it is not even December (note: I have many friends at Western, Osgoode, U of T, Queens, and elsewhere who have not been so fortunate). This, in addition to the many wonderful "hands-on" type experiences such as Moot Court competitions at Oxford University and in New York, externship and clinical opportunities which are second to none - safe to say the Dual Program was a safe bet. So as much as I appreciate your elitism and candour (probably coming from someone who hasn't even been admitted to law school), you should probably take it elsewhere. 

I think Dennings has addressed your misinformation and my post wasn't elitist. I asked a realistic question. The dual program at Windsor is incredibly expensively and I just don't see the pay back.  I actually considered Windsor's dual program, but I decided against it because I didn't see the value for money. I wanted the option of working anywhere in America, but when I spoke to numerous large American law firms, none of theme recommended Detroit. I think it makes a lot more sense to take the single JD at Windsor. For the record, I got into every Canadian law school I applied to. 



#48 IPLaw071

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 03:43 AM

I'm only here to address the misinformation in your post. A student enrolling in the dual program at Windsor does not have a 30-40% chance at a job with one of the biggest Bay Street firms. In reality only 12% of the Windsor class lands on Bay Street in some capacity, and less than that land at the "biggest Bay Street firms". There is no demonstrable reason why a dual student would outperform the rest of the group when it comes to recruiting.

Again, I understand why you would want to defend your school against someone who said something obnoxious about it, but posting misleading information that may be relied on isn't helping prospective students. Keep in mind that those enrolling in the dual program are overwhelmingly those who don't have other Canadian JD options, and in many cases are people who will take on a lot of debt to complete the program. They have a right to know what the employment prospects actually are before they take on that burden.

 

 

I think Dennings has addressed your misinformation and my post wasn't elitist. I asked a realistic question. The dual program at Windsor is incredibly expensively and I just don't see the pay back.  I actually considered Windsor's dual program, but I decided against it because I didn't see the value for money. I wanted the option of working anywhere in America, but when I spoke to numerous large American law firms, none of theme recommended Detroit. I think it makes a lot more sense to take the single JD at Windsor. For the record, I got into every Canadian law school I applied to. 

 

I think it's kind of hard to say how many Dual students vs Single JD students get Bay street jobs as Windsor's public Bay Street stats are merged between the two programs. CanadianJD27 is right in that only the Career Services office at Windsor would know the actual stats. Also, in my experience, way more of the Dual students want to pursue Bay Street than the Single JD students, which I can imagine would skew results to make it look like more Dual JDs get Bay Street jobs than Single JDs. Although, the desire to pursue Bay Street may also be a result of the high tuition (more debt and therefore more pressure to get a high paying job to pay it off).

 

I'll just say that my experience through the Dual JD program has been great so far, I don't feel disadvantaged at all being in the program and have actually gotten some amazing opportunities out of the program, despite what some people may say on these forums. I think an important factor to highlight about whether you should go into the Dual JD program (which I have yet to see discussed in these forums) is your level of maturity and conviction to a particular career path. I don't think someone coming straight out of undergrad, with minimal experiences on their resume to differentiate them is a good fit for a Dual JD. I also don't think a Dual JD is for people who don't know what area of law they want to practice after law school. Lets be clear, there are reasons to pursue a dual degree in Canada and you should not enter the program if you don't know what you want to use the dual degree for. If you want to pursue international trade, international IP, international criminal law, coordination of global legal strategies, or anything else requiring an understanding of the law from a comparative perspective, the Dual JD degree will be an asset. Now I do want to differentiate that an asset is different than a requirement, you can do all of these things without a dual degree, but you may have an easier time breaking into these fields if you possess a dual degree and the the dual degree may help facilitate you in bettering your practice in these fields since you'll constantly be learning the law from a comparative perspective. In this view, I think conviction to a particular area of law is important. Lets face it, the dual degree is expensive, and you really shouldn't pursue it if you don't plan on using both degrees in some way or another, just like any other degree law or otherwise. From what I've seen, the students who were the most successful in the Dual program were the ones who knew what they wanted to do and had a good reason for pursuing both degrees, because all your interviewers for OCIs will inevitably ask you why you're pursuing a dual degree. This is also why I think maturity is important, I don't think most people coming straight out of undergrad know what area of law they want to practice, I think a few years of work experience may help to give your career goals a bit of direction, this also inevitably ends up helping in the job search during OCIs and after law. Now if what you want to do is facilitated by a dual degree, Windsor probably has the best dual program in the country, you get both degrees in 3 years, and you're learning both legal systems simultaneously (as opposed to sequentially which is what other dual programs in the country do). This aspect of the program will help facilitate your learning of the law from a comparative perspective as well, which is important for careers with an international focus/aspect. I think the Dual JD program is a bad match for someone if they don't know what they want to do with their career and just want to get a law degree to get a secure and high paying job. The Dual JD program rewards conviction, just like any other program and due to the high cost of the program, if you don't have conviction then you shouldn't go into the program.


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#49 healthlaw

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 01:50 PM

I've been on this forum for a few years and I'll never understand why people feel the need to come onto Windsor's forum just to trash talk the Dual program. There are so many threads where applicants are genuinely seeking information to make an informed decision, only to have the thread get derailed. It's as though non-windsor students need to make themselves feel better about their respective programs by crapping on another program. 

 

I don't go to Windsor but I have two friends that do and they absolutely love the Dual program. There are pros and cons just like any other program/any other school. 

 

TL;DR: trolls need not comment on Windsor threads. Allow potential applicants to seek information. If you have something constructive to add great, if not, just be quiet! 


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#50 ryansmithjones14

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 10:33 AM

I've been on this forum for a few years and I'll never understand why people feel the need to come onto Windsor's forum just to trash talk the Dual program. There are so many threads where applicants are genuinely seeking information to make an informed decision, only to have the thread get derailed. It's as though non-windsor students need to make themselves feel better about their respective programs by crapping on another program. 

 

I don't go to Windsor but I have two friends that do and they absolutely love the Dual program. There are pros and cons just like any other program/any other school. 

 

TL;DR: trolls need not comment on Windsor threads. Allow potential applicants to seek information. If you have something constructive to add great, if not, just be quiet! 

 

My thoughts exactly. As a Dual student, I'm happy to discuss the pros and cons of the program with potential students. I'm certainly not under any illusions that the program is perfect; all law schools have their own issues. That being said, I'm perfectly happy where I am and don't feel the need to go on other law school threads to criticize those programs, especially when I don't have any experience with it. 


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