realpseudonym

Ask a 1L at Dal

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Hey Realpseudonym.... (nice handle....lol)

 

 

Thank you for the response. Yes, you are correct in thinking I am over 35. I am actually 40... eeek!!  I assumed my experience would be a lot different starting out,  as I am aware that most 1L’s are in their early to mid 20’s. I am actually interested in that, as the laws for my generation, were a lot different then, then they are now.

Let me correct myself, the laws are not different, the things that the law had to deal with, and enforce, were a lot different.

Take social media for example, at no time in my youth, did I have to worry about myself, or any of my friends being charged with distribution of pornography for e-mailing a photo to a friend. 

 

Anyway...Not to get off topic.....

 

I am appreciative of your response. I am also, anxious for a reply with regards to my acceptance. I have applied as a “Special Applicant” ( Old...(lol)...and have a been to College, and University)  I have also run two successful businesses, worked for two different companies, bringing in millions of dollars for each and currently work for a not for profit organization.  

 

I have not herd anything back yet.

 

I am just curious as to the importance the admissions committee would see in admitting someone who has not only academic experience, but also life experience; with family, divorce, business, sales, philanthropy, community and economic development...etc.  Not that you have any control over that. I guess I am just curious if they do actually admit people like me.

 

I feel like I am now selling myself to you...lol.  I appreciate the feedback. I think it is great that you offer your feedback to new students. As a mom, I cant help but appreciate the calming effect you are giving to new students. I Thank you for that, and hope to someday have the pleasure to meet you.

 

Your interest in helping others pursue their legal career speaks volumes. You should be proud!!

 

I wish you all the best in you Law career. You have obviously made the right choice.

 

Cheers,

A :-)

Sorry I'm a little slow to answer right now. I'm in the midst of 1L exams, which you'll all have the pleasure of doing this time next year, if you're accepted and come to law school. 

 

I'm glad you find this thread helpful. That's good to hear. 

 

Unfortunately, I can't really offer you much feedback about your application. I sometimes answer peoples' "chances" question on this forum. However, I usually do so for people who apply under the regular category. Those cases are a little easier to predict, because (a) I have first-hand experience applying that way and (b) there's information available about both minimum requirements and successful applicants' profiles.  For the special / mature categories, I just don't know any of that. 

 

People absolutely get in as special and mature applicants. Those categories are designed for people with great stories like yours. However, as far as I know, life experience isn't the only thing that the committees consider for applicants with unusual profiles. Grades and LSAT scores still play a role. I can't really say much more than that; I don't know how they weigh the relevant factors, how many spots there are, or what the competition is like under the mature category.

 

I'm fairly sure that those applications are considered later though (and I think they'll offer you an interview if they're interested). So the silence isn't a bad sign, yet.

 

Good luck 

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Hi all,

 

I'm a current 1L at Dal and wanted to give you a tip to prepare for school. I wish someone told me about this before I started law school.

 

LEARN TO TYPE FAST.

 

If you are a person who can type at a pretty high speed - you are good to go.

if you are someone (like me) that did not ever take a touch typing course or never had the need to type at super sonic speed - take a touch typing course. It takes time to practice to get to a pretty good typing speed.

 

The reason you need to type fast in law school:

 

1. EXAMS ARE TYPED OUT - this would be the number one reason to have a pretty good speed in typing. Dal uses a software called Exam4 which would lock the hard drive in your computer and only give you access to type the exam. Trust me. I really wish someone told me about this.

 

2. Typing notes in class - this will make your life easy come exam time when you have to condense your notes to study for exams. I prefer writing on paper to take notes, but it was double work when I had to prep for exams.

 

That's all I've got! Good luck!

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Thanks for the post! How many words per minute should the goal be? 40+ words per minute, or higher?

 

Thanks.

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Thanks for the post! How many words per minute should the goal be? 40+ words per minute, or higher?

 

Thanks.

I believe the average person is between 40-60. Therefore, I think fast would be over 60. 

 

Interesting enough I just took a typing test online, and scored 141 on one site and 125 on another. Apparently I'm top 0.01% - that's news to me haha! 

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I think a typing course would be helpful but definetly not essential. I found my typing speed increased by quite a lot this year just by typing notes in class (especially during review classes).

 

Also although you should try to increase both your speed and spelling together, I wouldn't worry as much about spelling. The general feeling I get professors is that spelling errors are expected on exams.

 

Some of my best marks from fall had pretty glaring spelling errors in them. For spring exams I've been focusing more on length and quality of arguments rather then spelling, although it is pretty depressing closing Exam4 after an exam and having to count on two hands the amount of spelling errors you've made on the first page....

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I'd consider 40 words per minute kind of slow for law school purposes. I was probably marginally faster than that when I first got here and found it a little tough to get down everything I wanted to in lectures. I'm sure once you're around 60+ per minute, then you're definitely fast enough to do well on an exam (although everything helps). 

 

Like neymarsr said, you'll usually improve just by typing in class though -- I did. But when I practiced online, I got a lot better. 

 

edit: If you're not a touch typist (i.e., you don't use all of your fingers, but rather hunt-and-peck 1-3 fingers), then I would recommend a course. 

Edited by realpseudonym
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I don't know if this is the right place to ask, but do you guys know how Dal calculates your last 2 if you're currently in 4th year?  Would they take the first semester of 4th year, 3rd year, and the 2nd semester of 2nd year?  Or do they not split years?

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I don't know if this is the right place to ask, but do you guys know how Dal calculates your last 2 if you're currently in 4th year?  Would they take the first semester of 4th year, 3rd year, and the 2nd semester of 2nd year?  Or do they not split years?

I'm not really sure. I always thought that they meant the last ten credits that you'd done, i.e., that they probably would split years. I've never checked this though -- I'm just assuming. 

 

Maybe email them?

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Thanks for the post! How many words per minute should the goal be? 40+ words per minute, or higher?

 

Thanks.

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If you can get to 60wpm, that's great! Also, definitely don't worry about spelling mistakes. As long as someone can read it and make out the sentence/word, you are good.

 

ps - sorry for reposting your question, FITONE. It's too early in the morning..... Hahaha!

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I was wondering if anyone knows if there are financial advisers at dal who could help me in choosing what my best plan of action for payment would be (ex. Student government loan versus a line of credit.)

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Dumb question that I can't seem to find an answer to: do I need to send my final transcripts in if I've already accepted my offer?

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My grades dropped slightly in second semester (once I knew I was accepted) so I chose not to send my final transcript in. It didn't hurt me and I still received a decent entrance scholarship so I'd say you're fine.

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Dumb question that I can't seem to find an answer to: do I need to send my final transcripts in if I've already accepted my offer?

No, I asked Rose when I got accepted and she said sending in a final transcript helps her with making the first year statistics, but it is not required.  

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I've got a 2 bedroom apartment locked down for September in Halifax and I'm just wondering what the best way to find a roommate is? I'd like to live with someone in my law class in order to be on a similar schedule. When about a does a Facebook group usually pop up for accepted applicants?

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Hey I've got a dumb question, do we have dal emails already? If so where do I find mine?

Hey okay so I don't know if I was supposed to but I did! You can get it through using your student number (given to you on your acceptance letter) and you can use the link below to find your netID which is also your email! Again I'm not sure if I was supposed to do it but it worked!

 

EDIT: I don't think the link works by clicking on it from here, what I did was google "my dal what is my netid" and the first link should bring you to the right page with a bunch of links!

 

https://password.dal.ca/ 

 

Edited by MrJimBusiness

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Bit of a random one here, but what are prices like for internet service in apartments? Do any of the providers have worthwhile student deals?

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When you consider that you're either going with Bell or Eastlink, and their packages are virtually the same (with the exception that one typically undercuts the other from year to year on their student deals) you begin to understand that their really isn't much choice. The price works out to be about $55-65 for the (basic, non fiber-op) student deal (only available during the school semester typically), and $65-75 during the summer months.

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