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#51 Cabaret

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Posted 16 March 2016 - 09:34 PM

Do 1L exams run until the end of the exam period (the Friday)? How far in advance do you receive the examination schedule? 

 Typically, yes. You know at least a few months in advance.


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#52 bernard

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Posted 17 March 2016 - 03:42 AM

As someone who took the bus to school for a year and then drove to school for a year, driving is infinitely better.


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#53 Garbo123

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Posted 20 March 2016 - 07:58 AM

Do 1L exams run until the end of the exam period (the Friday)? How far in advance do you receive the examination schedule? 

 

The exam schedule is decided in the summer before upper year course selection happens so yeah, you will have tons of advance notice. For 1L, the schedule is some variation of Tues/Thurs - Mon/Wed/Fri. I believe it's handed out on day one.

 

Same goes for 2L and 3L. You can only write one exam per day so you have to think about your exam schedule when you sign up for courses.


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#54 SpecterH

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Posted 20 March 2016 - 08:10 AM

I literally scheduled my courses in 2L according to their respective exam schedules. Though, there are some upper years who are only now finding out their exam schedules because it wasn't a consideration for them when selecting their courses.

 

I highly recommend my approach - within reason.

 

Edit: But 1L is quite predictable. In December, I believe mine was a Tuesday/Thursday/Monday/Wednesday/Friday schedule, and April was a Friday/Monday/Wednesday/Friday/Monday/Wednesday exam schedule (yeah, it's rough times).


Edited by SpecterH, 20 March 2016 - 08:11 AM.

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#55 Rearden

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Posted 20 March 2016 - 11:07 AM

This year the midterm schedule (at least for me) was:

Week 1: Tuesday, Thursday

Week 2: Monday, Wednesday, Friday

 

Because we have one more course (either Corporate or Ethics) in the winter semester, my final exam schedule looks like this:

Week 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Week 2: Monday, Wednesday, Friday

 

Unfortunately, there is very little time (about 2 days) between the end of classes and the beginning of exams: our last class is on April 15 (a Friday), and our first exam is on the 18th (following Monday).


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#56 SpecterH

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Posted 20 March 2016 - 12:09 PM

This year the midterm schedule (at least for me) was:

Week 1: Tuesday, Thursday

Week 2: Monday, Wednesday, Friday

 

Because we have one more course (either Corporate or Ethics) in the winter semester, my final exam schedule looks like this:

Week 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Week 2: Monday, Wednesday, Friday

 

Unfortunately, there is very little time (about 2 days) between the end of classes and the beginning of exams: our last class is on April 15 (a Friday), and our first exam is on the 18th (following Monday).

 

Finally. This is how it should have been. We finished classes on the Wednesday last year and started with the 100% Ethics final on the Friday.


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#57 Hello12345

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Posted 21 March 2016 - 11:05 AM

Can someone comment on how intramural sports work? How can we get involved?



#58 Cabaret

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Posted 21 March 2016 - 11:07 AM

Can someone comment on how intramural sports work? How can we get involved?

 

Western Law tends to field teams for intramurals. It will be sent out to students, then you sign up online to join the law school team.

 

I think you have to pay a deposit and take a short quiz. 



#59 Hello12345

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Posted 21 March 2016 - 11:45 AM

Western Law tends to field teams for intramurals. It will be sent out to students, then you sign up online to join the law school team.

 

I think you have to pay a deposit and take a short quiz. 

a quiz?



#60 Cabaret

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Posted 21 March 2016 - 12:52 PM

a quiz?

 

I believe it was about the rules of the game? I don't think it was supposed to be very hard. I'm pretty sure the quiz is required by Campus Rec or something like that. 


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#61 Hello12345

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Posted 21 March 2016 - 01:17 PM

I believe it was about the rules of the game? I don't think it was supposed to be very hard. I'm pretty sure the quiz is required by Campus Rec or something like that. 

Haha ok that makes sense. Thanks



#62 SpecterH

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Posted 21 March 2016 - 02:08 PM

Haha ok that makes sense. Thanks

 

To clarify - it is a quiz re: the rules of the game. It's silly and annoying but unfortunately, mandatory this year. You'll be provided with the rules and regulations in a PDF, so it'll just be a matter of finding it in there somewhere.


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#63 futureca

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 09:28 AM

Hey all, do 1Ls have a January intensive or is that upper years only?



#64 SpecterH

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 11:04 AM

Hey all, do 1Ls have a January intensive or is that upper years only?

 

In lieu of a typical January Intensive, 1Ls have three weeks in January to write a lengthy memorandum as part of their Legal Research, Writing, and Advocacy course. At the end of the preparation of the memorandum, there will be a moot where the 1Ls will have to advocate for one side of the argument (essentially).

 

In upper years, you'll take a course.


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#65 futureca

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 11:53 AM

In lieu of a typical January Intensive, 1Ls have three weeks in January to write a lengthy memorandum as part of their Legal Research, Writing, and Advocacy course. At the end of the preparation of the memorandum, there will be a moot where the 1Ls will have to advocate for one side of the argument (essentially).

 

In upper years, you'll take a course.

 

Thank you!!



#66 Rearden

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 01:51 PM

Just to provide you with more -- perhaps too much -- information about the moot component at the end of 1L January term...

 

After you hand in your memorandum, the schedule looks like this:

 

Day 1 (Monday): 
- Hand in memorandum in the morning
- Factum problem (which is based on the memorandum problem) distributed
- Sides (respondent/appellant) and opponents assigned (you pick one person from your small group to be your "co-counsel")

 

Days 2 & 3 (Tuesday & Wednesday):
Time to work on the factum and prepare for the moot

 

Day 4 (Thursday): 
Hand in your factum (typically in the morning)

- Receive copy of opposing counsels' factum

 

Day 5 or 6 (Friday or Saturday): Moot

 

The moot itself is appellate style, which means that the judges (your small group professor and your LRWA TAs) will be peppering you with questions throughout your submissions. They will be trying to throw you off and will be testing your abilities, so you need to know what you're talking about -- expect difficult questions, detailed hypotheticals, questions about the facts of each case you and your opponents cite in your respective factums (facta?), and questions about your position on your opponents and/or your co-counsels submissions (i.e., you need to know your co-counsel's arguments as well as your own).  Preparation is key: Put together a binder, brief all relevant cases, anticipate questions and prepare responses in advance, and memorize your opening/closing statements (no more than a minute).

 

While the moot is somewhat informal (you are mooting against fellow small group members and it is only worth ~10% of your mark), for many mooting is a novel, nerve-wracking experience.  That being said, it was a lot of fun, it goes by quickly, and your professors/TAs will take into account that mooting is not everyone's forte.

 

Finally, for those of you who are not accustomed to public speaking, I would strongly recommend doing a moot or two (e.g., the Cherniak Cup) prior to January term.  I'd also recommend going to the Court of Appeal to get a feel for appellate level proceedings/advocacy.


Edited by Rearden, 22 March 2016 - 02:00 PM.

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#67 Cabaret

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 05:50 PM

Day 5 or 6 (Friday or Saturday): Moot

 

The moot itself is appellate style, which means that the judges (your small group professor and your LRWA TAs) will be peppering you with questions throughout your submissions. They will be trying to throw you off and will be testing your abilities, so you need to know what you're talking about -- expect difficult questions, detailed hypotheticals, questions about the facts of each case you and your opponents cite in your respective factums (facta?), and questions about your position on your opponents and/or your co-counsels submissions (i.e., you need to know your co-counsel's arguments as well as your own).  Preparation is key: Put together a binder, brief all relevant cases, anticipate questions and prepare responses in advance, and memorize your opening/closing statements (no more than a minute).

 

While the moot is somewhat informal (you are mooting against fellow small group members and it is only worth ~10% of your mark), for many mooting is a novel, nerve-wracking experience.  That being said, it was a lot of fun, it goes by quickly, and your professors/TAs will take into account that mooting is not everyone's forte.

 

Finally, for those of you who are not accustomed to public speaking, I would strongly recommend doing a moot or two (e.g., the Cherniak Cup) prior to January term.  I'd also recommend going to the Court of Appeal to get a feel for appellate level proceedings/advocacy.

 

Yeah, this is a great way to prepare. But if this is terrifying you or stressing you out...I think I spent a couple of hours on Wednesday and Thursday preparing/reading cases. I had a copy of my factum and the other team's factum. No binder, no briefs of cases. I also did not go tot he Court of Appeal (but did do Cherniak). 

 

You can definitely get through the Jan term moot by doing a ton of preparation, but if you are burned out by the end of Jan term, you can get away with spending less effort on the moot. 


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#68 Garbo123

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 12:49 PM

...

 

Finally, for those of you who are not accustomed to public speaking, I would strongly recommend doing a moot or two (e.g., the Cherniak Cup) prior to January term.  I'd also recommend going to the Court of Appeal to get a feel for appellate level proceedings/advocacy.

 

Cherniak isn't a moot, it's trial advocacy prep (doing a examination in chief / cross examination). Great stuff to do, but not really helpful for a moot; the style is drastically different and you will never be asked a question/objection to throw you off your game.

 

I'll add this though: you can also go to the SCC website and watch the appellate videos/read their factum's (especially handy if you're mooting that case). It's worth noting, however, that real appellate work and student mooting have some formal/stylistic differences; student mooting is often more about style/form than the substantive legal argument being put forward.



#69 Rearden

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 05:18 PM

Yeah, this is a great way to prepare. But if this is terrifying you or stressing you out...I think I spent a couple of hours on Wednesday and Thursday preparing/reading cases. I had a copy of my factum and the other team's factum. No binder, no briefs of cases. I also did not go tot he Court of Appeal (but did do Cherniak). 

 

You can definitely get through the Jan term moot by doing a ton of preparation, but if you are burned out by the end of Jan term, you can get away with spending less effort on the moot. 

 

That's fair.  Some people can get away with less preparation than others.  As someone who is not accustomed to public speaking, I tend to find that I am much less nervous when I know that I have prepared as thoroughly as I can.

 

Cherniak isn't a moot, it's trial advocacy prep (doing a examination in chief / cross examination). Great stuff to do, but not really helpful for a moot; the style is drastically different and you will never be asked a question/objection to throw you off your game.

 

My thinking in recommending Cherniak wasn't so much that it would provide experience that would be helpful for an appellate moot, but rather that participating in Cherniak is a good way to get exposure to public speaking.  But point taken.


Edited by Rearden, 23 March 2016 - 05:18 PM.


#70 corruptfate

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 02:07 PM

Any tips on places to avoid when looking for housing?


Edited by corruptfate, 28 March 2016 - 02:08 PM.


#71 InsertPseudonymHere

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 02:26 PM

Any tips on places to avoid when looking for housing?

 

If you go down the route of renting the basement of a house, make sure to check the place first and get a feel for who is living above you. I've seen people almost sign a lease of a basement because the pictures looked good, but the tenants above seemed like a nightmare for someone who studies a lot.

I wouldn't really know where to 'avoid' per se. I just signed a lease at 205 Oxford for my upcoming 1L year. Most of the 'student' apartments like 205 in London are nice.

Perhaps just avoid signing something not on a bus line. Someone posted in the Western Class of 2019 Facebook Group an image of where the busses go. Stay close to that, as one year in my undergrad I livd off of the bus line and it was an absolute disaster. 

The 6 bus and the 2 bus tend to come every 5 minutes, with the 13 coming less frequently (especially at night, it's like 1 bus every 30 minutes). So I would personally avoid living someone wholly dependant on the 13 line, but that's just me.


Edited by InsertPseudonymHere, 28 March 2016 - 02:28 PM.


#72 corruptfate

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 02:37 PM

If you go down the route of renting the basement of a house, make sure to check the place first and get a feel for who is living above you. I've seen people almost sign a lease of a basement because the pictures looked good, but the tenants above seemed like a nightmare for someone who studies a lot.

I wouldn't really know where to 'avoid' per se. I just signed a lease at 205 Oxford for my upcoming 1L year. Most of the 'student' apartments like 205 in London are nice.

Perhaps just avoid signing something not on a bus line. Someone posted in the Western Class of 2019 Facebook Group an image of where the busses go. Stay close to that, as one year in my undergrad I livd off of the bus line and it was an absolute disaster. 

The 6 bus and the 2 bus tend to come every 5 minutes, with the 13 coming less frequently (especially at night, it's like 1 bus every 30 minutes). So I would personally avoid living someone wholly dependant on the 13 line, but that's just me.

 

I was actually looking at 205 Oxford St. did you get a chance to see the unit? Is it as nice as the pictures? The only thing I'm worried about is that 600 sqft seems a bit small for a 1bdr apt



#73 Archer

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 02:50 PM

Can anybody comment (or PM me) what they would consider to be a generous bursary for Western Law? I received a quote and was pretty underwhelmed considering my financial circumstances. Also if anyone knows of any non-entrance scholarships or other forms of financial aid, that would be greatly appreciated. 



#74 InsertPseudonymHere

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 02:58 PM

I was actually looking at 205 Oxford St. did you get a chance to see the unit? Is it as nice as the pictures? The only thing I'm worried about is that 600 sqft seems a bit small for a 1bdr apt

Yeah! I thought it was nice. Some upper year law students vouched for it, too. I personally think 600 sqft will be fine for a single student at Western. I mean you're on campus a lot anyways, and considering what other places in London have to offer, it's a fair deal in my opinion. The building is very secure too, as is the parking garage.

The thing that stinks about finding an apartment right now is that it's kind of slim pickings as most leases get signed in like January/February. However I picked 205 because it's nice and because I hear a fair amount of law/grad students live there. 675 Richmond is another good building if you're looking for that 'luxury' student living thing that 205 markets itself as.


Edited by InsertPseudonymHere, 28 March 2016 - 02:59 PM.


#75 SpecterH

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 03:27 PM

Can anybody comment (or PM me) what they would consider to be a generous bursary for Western Law? I received a quote and was pretty underwhelmed considering my financial circumstances. Also if anyone knows of any non-entrance scholarships or other forms of financial aid, that would be greatly appreciated. 

 

For what it's worth, I received very little in 1L but a substantial amount in 2L.


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