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SA17

Chances of Acceptance. 3.3/170

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Hi there!

I have a GPA of 3.3 and an lsat score of 170.

I am employed with my University's Student Life as a Peer Academic Leader and am on the Varsity Lacrosse Team.

What do you think my chances of getting into a good law school are? i.e (Osgoode, Mcgill, UWO?)

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Hi SA,

 

Welcome to the forum.  If you haven't already taken a look at the various acceptance threads for the law schools you're interested in, that's a good place to start.  Some of the links can be found here.

 

Hopefully some other members can speak to your chances more specifically.

 

Good luck!

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Hi there!

I have a GPA of 3.3 and an lsat score of 170.

I am employed with my University's Student Life as a Peer Academic Leader and am on the Varsity Lacrosse Team.

What do you think my chances of getting into a good law school are? i.e (Osgoode, Mcgill, UWO?)

 

Hmm, where to begin.

 

First, you should disabuse yourself of the idea that there are "good" and "bad" law schools in Canada. If you look at the general admissions averages for our law schools, 90% are within the same 3.7-3.8, 160-162, competitive range. Toronto and UBC (and to a lesser extent Osgoode) run higher than average on both measures, but they are outliers. You will receive a good legal education at any of our law schools. The questions you should be asking yourself are:

 

1) Where do I want to work?

2) How much do I want to spend / can I spend for a legal education?

 

McGill is only an option if you have a good grasp of French (which I'm assuming you do since you're considering it). I am not familiar with McGill's admission standards, so I won't comment any further.

 

Assuming your GPA is on a 4.0 scale, it's not competitive; however, your LSAT score is outstanding. Schools which use index formulas (such as UBC) or schools that use generous drop-systems for calculating GPAs (such as UNB or Manitoba) will be your best shots. Schools which focus heavily on the cGPA (such as Osgoode) might make you wait a few months, but honestly with a 170 I find it hard to believe that you won't get an offer eventually.

 

Figure out where you want to live, how much you want to spend on tuition, and then tailor your applications to those schools.

 

 

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 Schools which focus heavily on the cGPA (such as Osgoode) might make you wait a few months, but honestly with a 170 I find it hard to believe that you won't get an offer eventually.

 

 

Looking back on this year's cycle at Oz, it's clear that the cGPA focus has made it very difficult for splitters, especially those with high LSAT scores and low cGPAs.

 

http://lawstudents.ca/forums/topic/32846-rejected-2013/?p=394241

http://lawstudents.ca/forums/topic/32846-rejected-2013/?p=393015

http://lawstudents.ca/forums/topic/32846-rejected-2013/?p=391709

 

OP, the best school you could be accepted to is UBC because their index formula is kind to splitters.  Osgoode is unlikely given your cGPA.  McGill, I believe, focuses on cGPA as well, draw your own conclusions.  UWO is the most realistic option.  Assuming your 170 was done in one sitting, Queens is another legitimate option. 

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From what i remember, an LSAT score is only optional for McGill. If you've already written it (which you have), then they will evaulate it along with your cGPA and other submitted materials.

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Your best bets are the prairie schools (i.e., Alberta, Calgary, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba). 

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