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Maps and Summaries


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#26 Uriel

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 01:39 PM

Bump, see first post.

 

If you're going to try using this kind of format, I'd recommend when you do your own you use teeny-tiny Post-It flags for all the headings and subheadings around the perimeter of the paper, so when a question comes up about videotape evidence you can just look around the outside and flip to the flag "Hearsay" rather than wasting time flipping through trying to remember if it was at the front or the back.

 

Also, I apologize --- I really wanted to scan in my old class notes for y'all because they were pretty fulsome, but unfortunately we have a new Copyright Act and they would be infringing copies if I were to make them now.



#27 Platodium

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 02:27 PM

while I "expressly agreed" to a lot of those terms, I only "agreed" to others... ur totally liable bro

 

p.s. you rock


Edited by Platodium, 23 February 2013 - 02:28 PM.


#28 Castles

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 08:35 AM

Uriel, I really must thank you for this posting. Your 'maps' provided me with the ideal 'skeleton' for my own maps.  Working with yours, e.g. filling in points of particular relevance to my classes, was a great way to study and engage the material and prepare maps worth taking into my exams.

 

I am three weeks from my first exam and am supremely confident.


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#29 rollinwiththehomies

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 03:44 PM

I <3 you Uriel.


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#30 Uriel

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 09:11 AM

Aww I love y'all too.  C'mere, little law nuggets.


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#31 Ilinizas

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 10:03 PM

Thank you. I've never seen or heard of this mapping idea... It's beautiful.

 

Can you offer a tip regarding "drawing lines?"

 

After a few months I'm finally wrapping my head around the fact that regarding a certain issue (whether an object is found on public or private property for example, or whether a parking situation is a bailment or a license - welcome back to 1st year property!)... ... cases are used to situate the facts along a spectrum, and there's a fuzzy line in there somewhere that determines whether your facts sit one side or the other.

 

I imagine it would be really helpful to actually draw lines representing issues, and plotting case names on them to know immediately which cases support which parties in exam scenarios - or perhaps which cases most closely match the scenario, and which are easily distinguished?

 

Is this a good idea? Do you have a better one?

 

Thanks so much!


Edited by Ilinizas, 09 November 2013 - 10:05 PM.


#32 Uriel

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 10:34 AM

That would be tricky to do.  A good exam question will be so ambiguous that it will turn cases inside-out or complicate those lines for you.

 

For example, on my first Property exam there was a question about adverse possession.  (In case you haven't got there yet, adverse possession is a doctrine whereby if you have been accidentally using someone else's land as your own long enough and without hiding it, the law will just grant it to you as if it was yours all along.)  Typically adverse possession requires a fence as a clear assertion that "no, I think this is mine".

 

I could have flipped right to the fence issue and cited that case that supported the plaintiff, but the fact was that he was running a farm that happened to be part apiary.  I argued in the defendant's favour that swarms of buzzing bees are just as effective a form of exclusion as a fence --- if not more.  So the case would have been put in upside-down.  

 

The reason why maps are designed the way they are, (i.e., to flag issues rather than determine them) is because of your part in the exam room: knowing the cases and being able to apply the reasoning and facts.  Your map should put you in mind of what issues are in play.  It's your job to play them.

 

On top of that, the principles in the cases don't always cut plaintiff-defendant.  Sometimes they cut owner-renter, or purchasor-seller.  And then the next case might cut the next way on the same principle.  And although Case X says the plaintiff wins, it might do so on Principle Y, which isn't present in the exam question --- so the plaintiff-wins case actually supports the defendant here.

 

Without knowing exactly what you were planning, it seems to me that line-drawing exercise could become disorganized and unduly decisive pretty quickly.  But if you've got a better method, by all means, invent it!  The common law generally could use your input!



#33 Ilinizas

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 12:24 PM

Beautiful! Thank you!



#34 Wenis

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 12:08 AM

Oh shit…. it's the middle of November.

 

Map requests for Evidence and Criminal Procedure please! Any help would be tremendously appreciated!

 

Edit: Found Evidence in the google doc linked in the OP. Thanks Uriel! 

 

Just need Crim Pro. 


Edited by Wenis, 12 November 2013 - 12:10 AM.


#35 Uriel

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 01:04 AM

 

 

Just need Crim Pro. 

 

Sadly, I am not one.   :(



#36 vdk4601

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 12:29 PM

Hey guys, I was wondering if anyone on here from any Canadian Law schools knows of any website which can give access to past 1L law exams WITH answer outlines. I know there are tons of exam questions available out there, but im specifically looking for explanations and and answer sheets that help you understand how to properly answer the questions.

any help would be highly appreciated as I am sure most f you can relate to how i am feeling right before the exams.

 

Cheers



#37 OsgoodeMan

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Posted 24 November 2013 - 10:39 PM

I posted this in a different form in the Osgoode area of the site, but this might be a more appropriate place for my supplication.  Can anyone PM me the passcode for Osgoodes portal to access upper-year summaries? Eternal gratitude would be bestowed.



#38 Uriel

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 08:04 AM

You may have trouble securing that code without proof of student ID.  I would imagine most prudent students would not provide access to their school's intellectual property without confirming that you're entitled to it.



#39 OsgoodeMan

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 01:32 PM

Hmm, fair enough, I suppose I do look pretty shady asking here lol



#40 Uriel

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 02:59 PM

It's tricky, but at least getting a PM here means you don't have to out yourself to the entire listserv.  :)



#41 lpa12threh

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 07:01 PM

It was interesting to skim a few of the maps provided. 

 

Just a question (I'm not a law student):

 

Are each of those maps for one final examination or something? If so is it 1L or more advanced? I definitely know law school would be a lot of work, but knowing almost 90 pages of taxation laws and cases off hand seems impressive to say the least. 

 

Or are these maps that are taken into an exam? 



#42 Uriel

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 09:09 AM

Each is for one final examination, most are for your first year, law school is a lot of work and you have to know many more than 90 cases.

 

You do get to take these maps into the exam with you, though you'll note that all of the information about what the cases were about, how they apply, and what the facts were are all assumed to have been memorized.  It seems impossible until you've done it, while you're doing it, and after you've done it.  :)



#43 buttercup_

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 03:13 PM

Oh wow, I just wanted to add my thanks for uploading these! 

 

I downloaded them over the summer (which really just scared me), then pretty much forgot about it until seeing this thread again. They are a million times more helpful than I initially realized - in fact, I'm fairly sure you had the same profs as me for a couple of courses - AND you managed to distil my 75 pages of disorganized crim notes into ~ 6 pages of rules :D 



#44 Uriel

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 03:21 PM

As has been widely advised, I would never build you up, baby, just to let you down and/or mess you around.


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#45 SamSept2014

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 01:46 PM

Does anyone have a link to case maps. I saw summaries but not maps.

Thanks

#46 Uriel

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 11:14 AM

I know this post is months old, but to clarify, the documents linked above are maps.  They are not summaries because they do not describe the actual result of each case.  Maps are like flow charts, whereas summaries are like overviews.


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#47 Swimmingaroundthesea

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Posted 10 September 2014 - 08:25 PM

Thanks for the cartography, Uriel. Any chance you could tell us which one of these maps you think is your best work? Which of these do you feel worked best for you? I only ask because I plan to read your maps in detail to get a sense of how I should start writing my own (I'm a "two-weeks-of-1L") and would love to know which one of your maps makes you the most proud. 


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#48 Scarlet

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Posted 09 November 2014 - 02:21 PM

Thanks Uriel for doing this!

 

I am not sure if I am the only one having this problem, but when I click on the link I am having trouble both opening and downloading the files. Is there something I am supposed to do that I am not doing?

 

Thanks again!


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#49 Uriel

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 02:03 PM

Thanks for the cartography, Uriel. Any chance you could tell us which one of these maps you think is your best work? Which of these do you feel worked best for you? I only ask because I plan to read your maps in detail to get a sense of how I should start writing my own (I'm a "two-weeks-of-1L") and would love to know which one of your maps makes you the most proud. 

 

I'd really have to go back into them and check.  I would suspect that the further on I go, the better I get at it.  So maybe Bus Org or Evidence?  Some are a bit of a mess, especially IP, because they contain so many statutory provisions.  It's hard to say "this is a good one" when different courses require different approaches.  The Crim map is not a good template for Contracts for that reason: half of it is statutory interpretation quotes and inclusions, rather than a straight-up integration of common law.

 

Thanks Uriel for doing this!

 

I am not sure if I am the only one having this problem, but when I click on the link I am having trouble both opening and downloading the files. Is there something I am supposed to do that I am not doing?

 

Thanks again!

 

At the top center you'll see an arrow.  Click the arrow to download the .rar archive.  Then use whatever program you have that unzips things to unzip the archive.  WinRAR is the most common example --- I don't know if anyone else has a better recommendation.  

 

Sorry about this; I thought .rar was a pretty common file format.  Maybe I'm just an old dude.



#50 kenoshakid

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 03:06 PM

At the top center you'll see an arrow.  Click the arrow to download the .rar archive.  Then use whatever program you have that unzips things to unzip the archive.  WinRAR is the most common example --- I don't know if anyone else has a better recommendation.  

 

Sorry about this; I thought .rar was a pretty common file format.  Maybe I'm just an old dude.

 

7zip is my decompressor of choice.


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