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Uriel

Maps and Summaries

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It was interesting to skim a few of the maps provided. 

 

Just a question (I'm not a law student):

 

Are each of those maps for one final examination or something? If so is it 1L or more advanced? I definitely know law school would be a lot of work, but knowing almost 90 pages of taxation laws and cases off hand seems impressive to say the least. 

 

Or are these maps that are taken into an exam? 

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Each is for one final examination, most are for your first year, law school is a lot of work and you have to know many more than 90 cases.

 

You do get to take these maps into the exam with you, though you'll note that all of the information about what the cases were about, how they apply, and what the facts were are all assumed to have been memorized.  It seems impossible until you've done it, while you're doing it, and after you've done it.  :)

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Oh wow, I just wanted to add my thanks for uploading these! 

 

I downloaded them over the summer (which really just scared me), then pretty much forgot about it until seeing this thread again. They are a million times more helpful than I initially realized - in fact, I'm fairly sure you had the same profs as me for a couple of courses - AND you managed to distil my 75 pages of disorganized crim notes into ~ 6 pages of rules :D 

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As has been widely advised, I would never build you up, baby, just to let you down and/or mess you around.

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I know this post is months old, but to clarify, the documents linked above are maps.  They are not summaries because they do not describe the actual result of each case.  Maps are like flow charts, whereas summaries are like overviews.

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Thanks for the cartography, Uriel. Any chance you could tell us which one of these maps you think is your best work? Which of these do you feel worked best for you? I only ask because I plan to read your maps in detail to get a sense of how I should start writing my own (I'm a "two-weeks-of-1L") and would love to know which one of your maps makes you the most proud. 

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Thanks Uriel for doing this!

 

I am not sure if I am the only one having this problem, but when I click on the link I am having trouble both opening and downloading the files. Is there something I am supposed to do that I am not doing?

 

Thanks again!

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Thanks for the cartography, Uriel. Any chance you could tell us which one of these maps you think is your best work? Which of these do you feel worked best for you? I only ask because I plan to read your maps in detail to get a sense of how I should start writing my own (I'm a "two-weeks-of-1L") and would love to know which one of your maps makes you the most proud. 

 

I'd really have to go back into them and check.  I would suspect that the further on I go, the better I get at it.  So maybe Bus Org or Evidence?  Some are a bit of a mess, especially IP, because they contain so many statutory provisions.  It's hard to say "this is a good one" when different courses require different approaches.  The Crim map is not a good template for Contracts for that reason: half of it is statutory interpretation quotes and inclusions, rather than a straight-up integration of common law.

 

Thanks Uriel for doing this!

 

I am not sure if I am the only one having this problem, but when I click on the link I am having trouble both opening and downloading the files. Is there something I am supposed to do that I am not doing?

 

Thanks again!

 

At the top center you'll see an arrow.  Click the arrow to download the .rar archive.  Then use whatever program you have that unzips things to unzip the archive.  WinRAR is the most common example --- I don't know if anyone else has a better recommendation.  

 

Sorry about this; I thought .rar was a pretty common file format.  Maybe I'm just an old dude.

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At the top center you'll see an arrow.  Click the arrow to download the .rar archive.  Then use whatever program you have that unzips things to unzip the archive.  WinRAR is the most common example --- I don't know if anyone else has a better recommendation.  

 

Sorry about this; I thought .rar was a pretty common file format.  Maybe I'm just an old dude.

 

7zip is my decompressor of choice.

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Wow. I hope for my technological illiteracy I have helped someone as equally illiterate out there.

 

Many thanks, Uriel and kenoshakid!

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Not sure if this is the best place to post this but it kind of relates (feel free to move it or delete it if it's way off topic). During law school, I kind of found it difficult to get good summary materials. As you know, having good materials like what Uriel has generously posted here can make a huge difference in the time it takes to prepare for classes and exams. 

 

Most schools have a bunch of summaries on their websites but these are summaries donated by students and since not everyone is as nice as Uriel, my experience has been that most students save the good stuff for their friends and fellow members of law journals and clubs, etc, while posting their worst stuff on these sites.

 

I thought for a bit about how to make summaries more accessible to everyone (even the folks who don't want to join a pile of clubs) and thought that if we could incentivize good students to post their best material, then maybe good quality summaries would be more accessible to everyone. Maybe the incentive could be that the students could sell their stuff for a few bucks. This material would be rated by the users so that students (users) would know which ones are the best ones. I have a web design and programming background, so I spent a bit of time coding a site that might work for that purpose

 

Just wondering if you guys think this is a good idea, if there are any potential problems and whether you think people would actually use this site (as you know, if people don't want to sell their stuff then the whole thing is useless)? I'm not married to the idea and haven't invested a huge amount of time into it so feel free to let me know if the idea sucks.

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Not sure if this is the best place to post this but it kind of relates (feel free to move it or delete it if it's way off topic). During law school, I kind of found it difficult to get good summary materials. As you know, having good materials like what Uriel has generously posted here can make a huge difference in the time it takes to prepare for classes and exams. 

 

Most schools have a bunch of summaries on their websites but these are summaries donated by students and since not everyone is as nice as Uriel, my experience has been that most students save the good stuff for their friends and fellow members of law journals and clubs, etc, while posting their worst stuff on these sites.

 

I thought for a bit about how to make summaries more accessible to everyone (even the folks who don't want to join a pile of clubs) and thought that if we could incentivize good students to post their best material, then maybe good quality summaries would be more accessible to everyone. Maybe the incentive could be that the students could sell their stuff for a few bucks. This material would be rated by the users so that students (users) would know which ones are the best ones. I have a web design and programming background, so I spent a bit of time coding a site that might work for that purpose

 

Just wondering if you guys think this is a good idea, if there are any potential problems and whether you think people would actually use this site (as you know, if people don't want to sell their stuff then the whole thing is useless)? I'm not married to the idea and haven't invested a huge amount of time into it so feel free to let me know if the idea sucks.

Wow, that website is certainly aesthetically pleasing with an amazing UI. Props. For the whole 'rating' thing to work though you'll need a lot of people actually using the site.

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That's a great point. I guess I would need to add better sampling features to begin with so that people could get a good idea about what they're buying before shelling anything out by downloading sample content. Definitely not a perfect solution though, since the sample content might not be perfectly reflective of the overall content. Thanks for the positive feedback on the site design!

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^ Should also add that I think this idea could go somewhere, since commercial outlines are something that is lacking in Canadian Law school as compared to US law school. The main difference between commercial  (say the ones you can get with Barbri) and student made outlines, is that the latter are more likely to have of some mistakes. If you could somehow put together a way for qualified people to review and edit the outlines prior to them going up, I think that would add a lot of value (and actually substantiate the cost, since you can easily get outlines for free).

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I was thinking about adding a verification badge to certain outlines that have been reviewed by:

 

1) confirming the overall usability and detail (does it read well, etc.)

2) confirming the seller's grade from the course (as a proxy for accuracy)

 

This could be an optional thing for sellers but I'm wondering if it would add the credibility needed to substantiate the cost (if the site essentially said, "These are the three best summaries submitted by A students").

 

I'm guessing that the reason Canada doesn't have the stuff that the US does (though we do have Irwin Law) is that the market for law students is much smaller such that it would be cost-prohibitive to hire a real law professor to create the outline.

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IP isn't a huge part of my practice, so I may be off-base here, but I do hope that you're getting legal advice about the propriety of this as a commercial venture. Especially when you're using professors' names.

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I uploaded my maps but did not upload my summaries specifically because the latter would be offside the Copyright Act.

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^ Should also add that I think this idea could go somewhere, since commercial outlines are something that is lacking in Canadian Law school as compared to US law school. The main difference between commercial  (say the ones you can get with Barbri) and student made outlines, is that the latter are more likely to have of some mistakes. If you could somehow put together a way for qualified people to review and edit the outlines prior to them going up, I think that would add a lot of value (and actually substantiate the cost, since you can easily get outlines for free).

 

I agree. If there were a way to verify/substantiate the quality of the outlines, I think many students would have no problem paying the fee knowing they would receive a solid foundation. Without the verification, however, I would be less inclined. 

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