Jump to content


  • Content count

  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

4 Neutral

About nolovelawst

  • Rank

  1. Taking a Year Off to Apply

    I took 4 years "off" before applying to law school to work. Made some money, got some life experience, traveled a bit, did community service work, developed a few hobbies. Best decision I ever made. Law school has been way less stressful than I remember undergrad being. I think it's mainly because I took a bit of time to figure out who I am. Now I can be fully committed to my studies. Having some money in the bank helps a bit too Incidentally, I got in everywhere I applied. So there is no disadvantage in terms of admissions, as long as your GPA and LSAT are fine. On the other hand, I have plenty of friends who went straight to JD. Most of them are doing just fine. I'm not saying one necessarily needs to take as much time as I did. Just that a bit of time out in the world is not a bad thing by any means. Just pick the right path for YOU.
  2. For sure. And it's not a bad one either. I know being connected to the community is a HUGE issue for some of the large regionals in BC, AB, Sask. They worry a bit about flight risk. However, biglaw in Cgy and Van don't seem to care. They are competing nationally, anyway. I imagine that they realize that many of the people they hire will have also applied to Bay Street.
  3. Yup, they occasionally ask. But I'm pretty confident it isn't issue for me. I have family here, been here a number of years now. Also, they seem pretty satisfied when they learn that I didn't (and won't) apply to Toronto at all.
  4. Does anyone regret going to law school?

    I had a previous career in a completely unrelated industry. Have worked blue collar, white collar, and public servant jobs. Politicking is just a fact of life and generally an important skill to have. I'm not a fan either. But just wanted to point out that it is far from being unique to law.
  5. West only. I'm from the 6, but not planning on going back anytime soon. It's really nice here! From what I understand it's the same thing out here. You need to be highly interested and that interest needs to be both genuine and transparent. Can't fake your way through it, nor can you be overly coy and "hold your cards close to your chest". I think, if anything, I might have suffered from a bit of a "try-hard" vibe at times (see previous post re "energy levels"). It's not so much nerves as it is a function of my personality. In other words, my top 3 firms definitely knew I was keen on them! Thanks for all the advice everyone. Some really great general tips! I will try to be more aware of energy levels during the interview process, while still being myself.
  6. Thank you both! I'll definitely try recording myself. Incidentally, I did a few mock interviews and was told I would be OK. That is only a specific, fixed data point. Still, I think I have the basics down. Regarding the factors you both gave, I'm leaning a bit toward "talks too much". Energy (too high) may be an issue too, since it could make one appear arrogant. This all may not come through during a mock, since the same pressure is not there. Appreciate the feedback, and I'll keep this all in mind as I go to articling week.
  7. Hi all, Longtime lurker. Great forum which often has the answers I'm looking for. But something has been eating away at me lately and I can't find another topic that addresses it. For some context, I'm a western Canada 2L who is starting to get a bit nervous as articling week approaches (shocking, I know). Looking to work big law or large regional, with my eye on a few specific places (I've reached out to them and networked a bit, already). I went through both the 1L and 2L summer OCI process for large/med firms. I have been getting far pretty consistently (in-firm interviews, dinners, etc.) but have failed to close on anything. From speaking to my friends (who were successful), it seems like I'm doing the right things. Good Interviews, being *genuinely* interested, conveying that interest, hitting it off with people at dinners, etc. I don't want to get too hung up on myself here, but I just thought it would be great to start a general discussion about common factors that will push one candidate over the other in the later stages of the process. Surely there are a TON of variables at play, including "fit" and a lot of other intangibles (plus maybe a wee tiny bit of chance). In other words, when firms are down to their last 20 candidates for 5 jobs, what starts to matter? What are some strategies that a genuinely interested applicant could employ to give themselves a leg up when it comes to those later stages? ------------------------------------------ Don't want this to be just about me, but I have lurked this forum long enough to know that people will ask: GPA is top 11-20% of class (consistently B+, couple of As and A+)...ECs are very strong...have work experience before/during law school (some of it law related) Interview skills are hard to self-evaluate, but I would rate ~70-85 percentile range depending on interview style. In short, there is a reason I'm getting far in the process.