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ImposterSyndrome

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  1. Please help! Pursuing Law School after a Masters Degree??

    Also consider that just because you qualify as a mature student doesn't mean it is ideal for you. It would be if your undergraduate grades are not that good in which case you want to emphasize your ECs. I will start law school at 26. Took a chunk of time to figure out what to do and even got into a Masters program that I wasn't excited about anymore. Skipped the Masters, traveled for many months, and pursued a different career. Never regretted it and think I am more prepared now as a mature(-ish) student than had I started law at 23. Also I read that the average age is generally 25 so really you are not too old at 26. Also, I know of someone who started law school at 30 years old and if anything there were benefits for him to get the JD at an older age. First of all, your previous life experience (esp. your Masters) will give you something to stand out from other students during recruitment. Second, your Masters will make you more prepared for the effort that law school requires. If it does, you'll do better, get better grades, and stand out even more in recruitment. Lastly, you should always do what excites you most. Better to do a Masters you are more excited about and miss out (temporarily) on the JD than the reverse. Getting into a law school again is also somewhat more probable than getting into this very particular Masters program again. Good luck!
  2. I recomend a diet of fast food. It's fast food so it will make you fast at doing the LSAT. I think what people are saying here is great and I am not trying to denounce it in any way but just want to add a grain of realism to it. If anything, it's for the casual readers who stumble upon these forums in search for their own LSAT study advice. The aformementioned advice is great and if I had the chance to implement it into my LSAT study, I would have. But I couldn't afford it as I was working a highly variable schedule and was far too busy with other things to make that all happen. So if you are in the same position as I was, don't stress not being able to have a healthy and ideal routine.a One tip that you can add to any routine is that you should see if you can get any study material on the go. Even if it is just a selection of logic games, its nice to have them available for whenever you have a free minute (e.g. at lunch or waiting for an appointment). It really helped me as I took the train nearly everyday and was able to do study on the go. There are also a lot of LSAT apps that are, admittedly, far from perfect but will still give you some practice problems on the go to help keep you focused. Lastly, fast food won't make you faster at the LSAT (if only) but I have foregone making a healthy meal for fast food just so I can have some more time to focus on studying. In other words, make your routine as healthy as you can. It will help you be at your best when you study and take the LSAT but don't let it get too much in the way of doing your studying. Cheers and best of luck!
  3. Rejected From Calgary 2018

    I just want to clarify my last bit in my previous post just because I reread it and clearly I shouldn't have done such a hurried job finishing up because I think I sent the wrong message with it. I didn't mean to say that UofA being more established and having a larger allumni base was its only possible reason to be superior to UofC. Reading it know, it sounds like that was what I was trying to say. Rather I meant it as an example of what could be a more direct reasoning of why UofA could be considered better. I also wanted to point out that besides awful reasoning being a pet peeve for me, it shouldn't be an argument (least of all here) of which uni is better than the other. Rather, on the appropiate forum, we should only be asking what university is right for you? Because each university has its pros and cons that may make it the better University for you but not necessarily for another.
  4. Rejected From Calgary 2018

    Although I agree that HoFChaos' claim that we should ignore everything you have said or will say is not fair or respectful, I do want to refute your argument here. First of all, I should say that having early offers does not make you an authority on Canadian Law Schools. Second of all, GPA and LSAT averages do not strictly mean UofA has a stronger starting class than UofC considering UofC's holistic admissions process. Even if it was the case, a stronger starting class has little to do with the actual quality of the university. And whether a bank gives more credit to UofA students again calls into question whether that is even indicative of the school's quality. I assume a bank is more concerned with the students' ability to repay debt after graduation than with the quality of their education. You could perhaps say that if students are better at repaying debts post graduation then they likely had more success at gaining articling positions which you could then argue must be a result of a better education or is a measurement of the quality of education. If anything, this was the strongest point in your argument even though it relies on the reader to fill in the blanks and make an assumption. Overall, I don't care much if UofA is better than UofC but I just found your argument to have some weaknesses. If anything, UofA would be the better school based on the fact that it is more established and therefore has a larger allumni to call upon. But in the end,I think its very subjective to claim one school is better than another.
  5. Attention transfer students

    Perhaps it is just me, but I am getting the vibe this person is using the term 'transfer' simply to say 'move'. That is to say, I suspect this is a student or graduate from UofM who is interested in starting LS at Queens. But I don't know for sure either. I guess we will wait for OP to clarify.
  6. I would just double check you cGPA calculations. I had some issues with it at first. You don't want to cancel only to find out your index is actually lower than you self-calculated. I don't remember exactly, but I think I remember students saying they contacted UBC law admissions and having them confirm their index score. Either way, best of luck!
  7. Factors Other Than CGPA/LSAT?

    From what I keep on hearing on the forums here is that law schools don't care what your program was or what school it came from. Just how well you did on the LSAT and your GPA. Plus some schools will take your ECs and refereneces into consideration if they are required on the application. What I have heard is rare is students in law school who have not completed their undergraduate degree. But that may be a correlation and not causation. I am just repeating what I have heard around. Feel free to correct me! Best of luck!
  8. Staying in a hotel before the LSAT?

    I think that unless you are easily distracted, you should just write at the Mississauga location too. Of course, it's your call but I think if you're like any normal person here you'll get the test and you will be focused so entirely on it the test will fly by and you'll not have noticed anything that happened nearby. And when you do the test be sure to dress in layers so you can adjust depending on how warm/cold the room is for you. On top of that, you can probably visit the mississauga location and get a feel for it before hand. Maybe it's just me but I also did a lot of studying in local cafes with lots of distractions around me. So perhaps I was also accustomed to tuning it out. Either way, best of luck!
  9. An LSAT Accommodation Experience

    Of course they are not and by and large I can stand behind LSAC's position on this one for the exact reasons Conge has mentioned. As for my Uni, I never got an official confirmation as to whether or not you could get extra time on exams just for having exam anxiety. However, I did hear from some people that you could get it. Maybe there's a loophole or these people were making false claims, I don't know but it doesn't really matter here. If exam anxiety is all it takes to get accomodations then it would make the LSAT highly unfair because I was terribly anxious during the LSAT and I imagine most people were. After all, its a test that largely determines if you will get into law school. That being said, I sympathize with people who have panic attacks and/or significant difficulty dealing with anxiety.
  10. A quick additional suggestion, unless you're in a philosophy major, I would pick up a philosophy class(es) at some point that teaches propositional logic, how to deconstruct arguments, formal arguments, etc. My university had this course titled as 'Reasoning and Argument' if my memory serves me. All of the above served me in both the logical and analytical reasoning sections of the LSAT surprisingly well. Especially propositional logic which is essentailly the logic games you will do on the LSAT. May as well take an "LSAT prep course" and get credit for it right? Good luck!
  11. An LSAT Accommodation Experience

    I can imagine that the rumour of it being near impossible to get may come from students who got accomodation in university but were declined to get it on the LSAT. In my university at least, it was supposedly very easy to get accomodations such as extra time on exams for exam anxiety. I wonder how LSAC considers exam anxiety. I knew of a number of students who got extra time on exams in uni because of serious exam anxiety but I don't know how that would transfer over considering the LSAT is a timed test. Everyone would do alot better on the LSAT if they were given double the time so I imagine they have to be very stringent. But if you're thinking of taking the LSAT and think you may qualify for accomodation, I would say to try and get it anyway. Better to try and get it than to possibly not do as well as you could have.
  12. An LSAT Accommodation Experience

    I think it's great you posted this. And I just wanted to give you a more verbal thank you. The LSAT is stressful as it is and accessibility is very important to people out there.
  13. UofC, UBC, or UVic? Which is best for me?

    To be fair, I never stated, implied, or questioned if it would be an advantage in the Clagary market. Just asked if it meant a better education. But thank you for adding your voice to the resounding answer that I should just go to UofC.
  14. UofC, UBC, or UVic? Which is best for me?

    Second that. There are a lot of misconceptions about different areas of law.

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