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ImposterSyndrome

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  1. Accepted to Calgary 2018

    I can't argue with cost. If UofA is more affordable and that is a real concern for you than maybe you should go there. Keep in mind things like practicality though. If you want to practice in Vancouver or Calgary then in Edmonton (from what I've heard, I'm a 0L too) you will invariable take summer and articling positions in either of those cities. This means a bit of moving and moving is a hassle and not cost free, not withstanding that most leases are yearly unless you go on residence. Where as at UofC, there's a lot less moving around needed to do should you happen to stay. Also try asking for recruiting rates from both universities by destination cities. Maybe more UofC grads go to Vancouver than you expect or the difference is less than you expected. Lastly, you could ask recruiters and larger law firms in Vancouver how many of their hirees are from Calgary versus from edmonton. Maybe there are a lot of articling students or younger associates who are more likely to move in one city than another. Hope this helps you choose!
  2. Scotiabank LOC application process experience

    I took this route (emailing and applying via email directly to the FA) and the end result was meeting the FA at their branch to sign off on the PSLOC. So if you're not able to meet them, it may cause you issues but I imagine that they're willing to let you sign at another branch if need be but I'm not entirely sure. I actually prefer it because I don't know too much about banking yet and having emails to look back on and to be able to email them should I come up with any new questions is very resourceful.
  3. Accepted to Calgary 2018

    I should say, then, that I don't actually think climate should be a considerable reason to choose a school for. Rather, as much as novel deciding factors like 'better climate', 'living by the coast', or 'getting to move to a new place' are appealing, I've come to learn that in actuality you'll be much happier going to a school you decided on because of factors such as 'proximity to your support network', 'hiring rates for where you want to live post-graduation', and 'cost' which will have far more affect on your success in law school and your confidence while you're there. So if climate is the only consideration that makes you want to go to UofC, I think you should bite the bullet and brave the only slightly colder climate of Edmonton. Plus its not like Calgary is so much warmer that you'll get to have a radically different experience as though it was L.A. versus Edmonton.
  4. Accepted to Calgary 2018

    It's warmer down here!
  5. High LSAT (173), abysmal gpa (2.0)

    Unfortunately, as for UVic's and UBC's index calculations, your 2.0 GPA brings you very far down and I don't think you can get accepted at either of those schools with your probably Index. Best of luck!
  6. How many PT should I do a week?

    I personally only did one PT every week or two or three (not sure) because I was less concerned with my performance as a whole than improving certain sections at a time and trying out methods to get the timing down. I personally made most of my progress doing a timed section, completing any questions after time runs out (but not scoring myself for them), and then reviewing the section afterwards. Now I didn't have a lot of large chunks of time to do a whole practice test in but I don't think that if I had, I would have done them. But I also never found myself feeling tired of the test after 4-5 hours so stamina was never an issue. So do it however you like but the most important part is how you review your errors, correct your reasoning, and then find out how to slim down timing in each section. So I find that reviewing right after you write a section gives you the ability to better remember what your approach and reasoning was to a question and, with that, be better able to resolve how you either came to the wrong answer or took too long on it. Best of luck either way!
  7. Dalhousie vs. Ottawa

    Did grades come out today or what? You created this account an hour ago and have only made posts about how much you dislike UOttawa. If you're going to provide criticisms, at least be somewhat more specific and thought out about it.
  8. You're not any better for saying this. If you're going to suggest getting a puppy as an alternative, suggest getting two. Not only do you give your puppy a friend for when you're not around, dogs are even better in pairs. Plus more of a good thing is never a bad thing. But actually, good on you for promoting puppies!
  9. Oh Well I guess now we know how you feel about having kids.
  10. I found 3 main considerations to be important. First and foremost is articling rates because I don't want to drop over 50 grand into an education and not secure work post-grad. Second to that is where I wanted to "settle down" after. One of the key pieces of advice that I heard a lot here is to srudy where you want to practice so keep that in mind with regards to where you want to study. Furthermore, I felt that the trade off of losing your support network for a supposedly better and more well known school is not actually in your best interest. I would be putting myself at a disadvantage by disregarding my friends and family and that could effect my performance in school to the point that being in abetter school does not make up for the lower grades. Another thing, I have the travel bug. Big time. I love travelling and so I'm always intrigued and drawn to the idea of moving for school. A friend of mine went to Oxford for her MA and PhD and I am super jealous. But when I step back I realize that is the wrong reason to chose a school for. As much as it sounds adventurous, moving is stressful and when you're in school living the budget life you don't get to fully enjoy the experiences that travelling affords. In fact, UCalgary may be more expensive in tuition than UBC, but living costs are much lower and these savings could go towards actually travelling. So be smart and pick the school that makes sense and not the school that sounds awesome or adventurous or that you can boast to your friends about. Those things don't matter as much as actually having friends and family in your life and having a financially secure future.
  11. Crowsnest/ Apartment

    Okay well later today I will send you some DMs with a few good listings to check out. I'm currently looking as well since I'm moving back to 'cowtown' sometime soon.
  12. Crowsnest/ Apartment

    No idea for crowsnest but there are a lot of great rental options in Calgary right now. Depending on if you drive or want to take public transit and other variables (do you mind downtown?, are you uncomfortable with sketchier areas?, do you want to be in a newer, modern building?, do you want budget options?, and do you want to be near trendy shopping areas?) I could give you a few pointers. Personally I like Mission and had a great budget apartment there. Boardwalk apartments are always a decent choice too.
  13. There is a buying/selling section on the forum. I recomend posting there.
  14. Does Calgary only accept people that are 25+

    The average age of students starting at UofC is 25. That means people under 25 are offered admission as well (otherwise the average would be higher). Now I have no legitimate source to support this, but I would guess that age is not a factor considered by the adcom. I hypothesize that because UofC is a holistic school, ECs matter and older applicants by virtue of having had more years to accumulate them, have more ECs on average (but not necessarily) and therefore admissions are skewed more towards older applicants than at some other schools. If you are really concerned about age being a factor in admissions, I suggest you email the admissions office for clarification.
  15. What does Calgary Consider to be Good Work Experience?

    So then is the outcome of your application not the result of how you fare against other applicants but whether you meet the subjective criteria set out by the adcomm member(s) that handles your application? I don't really have anything against that but find it to be a little shocking that it would be that unstructured. Also, how do you know this? I have hardly found any information regardibg the matter.
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