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andi28

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About andi28

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  1. Yes you'll have to send in your CEGEP transcript but schools won't look at those grades/they won't be included in any GPA calculation. But most (all?) schools want all of your post-secondary transcripts (so that includes CEGEP). Depending on the school, admissions might look at your last 2 years, your best 3 years (in your case, all 3) or your whole degree minus X number of credits. Because you'll only have three years worth of grades though, you won't have as much room for error as other people so try to focus on getting a really good GPA!
  2. UBC asked me to get a foreign evaluation for my exchange transcript which was simply ludicrous (cost me $330!!) but it might have been because I did a 2-semester exchange. From reading this forum, it looks like some people have had to get evaluations and others haven’t, depending on who from the admissions office responded to their email. But do email them to ask what your GPA is; it’ll help you better determine when you should expect an offer and give you peace of mind!
  3. Based on last year's thread, using your GPA without drops, you can probably expect to get an offer from UBC in mid to late July. Did you get grades at your exchange/study abroad university? I know that when I went on exchange, the classes I took only showed as Pass/fail on my home university transcript but I got actual letter grades on the exchange university transcript (that has to be sent to UBC by the way). When I emailed UBC, they told me that they would be using those grades to calculate my GPA. You could probably email them to ask if they've had time to calculate your GPA!
  4. It means that if you're currently in your fourth year, they won't use this year's grades to calculate your GPA (since they start making decisions before Fall grades are in and they'll be done before the Winter semester ends). If you already graduated, then yes, they will look at all four (or more) years.
  5. Definitely worth applying if law school is something you really want to do. Your GPA might be a bit low for some schools but definitely high enough for other schools. Plus, there’s still time to improve your GPA; even a small increase could make a big difference. It also appears you haven’t taken the LSAT yet and without a score, it’s hard to predict if your GPA is high enough. The good news is you still have a lot of time to study for the LSAT and get a score that could boost your chances.
  6. UBC drops worst 12 if you have a four-year degree and worst 6 credits if you're in your third year. I'm guessing you'd fit under that category.
  7. It's hard to determine your chances with absolute certainty because each school has their own way of calculating GPAs so you might lose or gain a few points depending on the school but I think your chances are pretty good at Alberta and Ottawa. I don't think your GPA will be able to compensate for your LSAT at UBC, UVic and UofT however. Not sure about the rest of the schools.
  8. Chances? cGPA 3.67 LSAT 147

    If you can afford it, I think you should get a tutor for a few sessions. There isn't that much time left between now and the Feb LSAT so a tutor might be able to point out what you're doing wrong and help you study more efficiently.
  9. OLSAS E-mail

    Probably an automated email. OLSAS said on their website that they'd have GPAs calculated by January but they ended up posting them in mid-December. So I'm guessing this is just an email to let us know academic records can now be viewed. Schools got our applications the first or second week of November and I know some if not all schools send you an email saying they've received your application. I got an offer before my GPA was available on the OLSAS website so don't worry about it!
  10. LSAT prep

    I second PoisonApple’s book suggestion! I found the LSAT trainer very helpful and easy to understand (for LR and LG). For RC the only thing that really worked for me was practice practice practice and more practice. If you haven’t already done so, I’d suggest getting a free 7Sage account; it’ll allow you to track your progress and see where your weaknesses are. You can also get explanations for pretty much every question online, on various websites and message boards. The lsat subreddit is also not bad if you have specific questions! Good luck!
  11. If your GPA is with drops and confirmed by UBC, Ryn’s predictor says ‘likely’ but I’d say, looking at last year’s threads, improving your LSAT score would definitely help. Someone with 82%, 165 LSAT got rejected and not even waitlisted two years ago (but they might’ve miscalculated their gpa) but in my opinion, you’re likely to get on the waitlist and if you get an offer, it would probably be very late, close to the first week of classes. Good luck!
  12. I think you should get in at UofT! I have about the same CGPA as you but a lower B3 (and a slightly higher LSAT but weaker ECs) and I got an offer a few weeks ago!
  13. Chances? Help! [3.15, 160]

    Agreed. Stats too low for UVic and probably Manitoba too unless your GPA somehow converts to above 3.25 (no one with GPA 2.0-3.24 and LSAT 160-164 got in, 3 people got in with 3.25-3.49, 160-164)
  14. Chances? Help! [3.15, 160]

    You might have a chance, off the waitlist, at Windsor or TRU but definitely not a shoe-in.
  15. You should definitely rewrite! Last year's Accepted thread has someone with a 90.97 index who only got in on August 21st (initially number 95 on the waitlist) so assuming that this cycle is about the same, you'd be cutting it VERY close. Retaking the LSAT might increase your chances and if your score doesn't improve, it won't matter because UBC takes your best score. Good luck!

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