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xtp

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About xtp

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  1. Bad/Average/Good/Excellent start

    Most law schools don't count the number of courses you are in, they simply check whether you were a "full time" student. At many schools this can mean taking only 3 courses. I took 4 courses my last 2 years of school (because I was lazy) and it wasn't a problem.
  2. Uh no. Not even close. That wouldn't even cover the salary and benefits of 3 employees. The admission standards are not ambiguous. They are very clear. They aren't trying to "suck" $$ out of applicants. I have no idea how you even think that. I'm trying really hard not to be a dick here. But really? Lots of money? They bring in a total of 160K from all of the applicants. If they really cared about money they could admit 16 extra students and bring in more than that. You people need to get a grip on reality. I understand this is a stressful process but imagining the law school is some sort of evil organization hell bent on stealing 80 dollars from you is not going to help.
  3. Bay Competition

    And google recieves 100 000 job applications per year but only hires 5000!... http://www.searchenginejournal.com/goog ... year/4308/ Looking at job application #s is a silly way to do this. I'd rather run 100M against 500 6 year olds than usain bolt.
  4. Demand doesn't mean "how many lawyers are needed", demand means "how many lawyers do it relative to how many are needed". At most firms you will find that good tax lawyers are certainly "in demand" much more so than other practice areas. Tax associates and partners, at every firm I interviewed at (6 in Toronto) stated that they worked fewer and more regular hours than their peers. Most tax lawyers don't do any litigation unless they want to be a tax litigator in which case its all they do. Re: other areas of law, it depends. Family lawyers start out making less money than corporate types (which could be seen as being in "less demand") but my understanding is that experienced family lawyers are always in high demand. People always need to get divorced... and commit crimes for that matter so I imagine the same is true for criminal defense lawyers. The problem with this whole discussion is that "in demand" is a very vague and unspecific. Like I said above, all lawyers are in demand in that all lawyers can do things that are useful for people. There aren't many (any) experienced lawyers who don't regularly turn down work.
  5. Coming from a CA this is pretty hilarious. Ask him what a CA at one of the big 4 makes 1 year after passing the UFEs. Its shockingly low for the amount they work. Also re: tax, yes its in demand and its probably a better life style than almost any other area but its also very different work from all other areas. It also isn't something you can fake, almost all good tax lawyers love tax law. Take corporate tax and do a tax rotation and see if you enjoy it but don't just decide on tax because its "in demand", almost all lawyers are in demand, that's why lawyers make as much as they do.
  6. Articling Salary During Bar

    I thought it was 13 days but I may be wrong. It's in that range either way.
  7. Compensation: Calgary vs. Toronto

    Bonus kicks in at the same time for both Calgary and Toronto. Toronto bonuses are the same as Calgary's generally (although this obviously varies from firm to firm). Your last statement isn't true at all, its pretty clear from the OPs calculations that until the 6th year an associate in Toronto is making more both net and gross. Its also worthwhile noting that as soon as you make partner the income tax advantage is greatly reduced if you work for a national firm like Blakes due to the way partnership income is taxed.
  8. Dollars per hour

    It depends on how you value your leisure time. In this situation you should work until you value your remaining leisure time at more than ~$20 per hour. If you find this interesting you may want to take some courses in microeconomics.
  9. attire advice

    That's actually really interesting. I wonder what accounts for the difference. Probably a regional thing, Vancouver is much more laid back than Toronto in my experience.
  10. attire advice

    FWIW when I did my moot practices no one wore a suit, this was true even when the practices were held at dt firms, we didn't discuss it before hand.
  11. Any ranking that includes York's location as a "pro" is highly suspect.
  12. Guys I think we need another 50 000 words and 2 pages of anecdotal evidence and vague assertions about grading policies at various schools please keep this going. The signal to noise ratio in this thread is really impressive!
  13. Hotness and OCIs

    You either have very low standards or were drunk when you were checking the students out.... The vast vast vast majority of lawyers and law students are ugly, don't worry about looks its not worth losing sleep over.
  14. Clerkships

    You need to chill the fuck out, message board insults are not the end of the world. Although challenging me to a fight is kind of hilarious. I'll be back in Toronto later this year if you want to meet up for 12 rounds of bare knuckle boxing or whatever you have in mind. If you don't want to be called an idiot spend a little time doing some research before you post and/or don't make posts that make you sound like an idiot.
  15. Vancouver Salaries

    Just so were all clear here, you think that articling and associate salaries are based on the profitability of the particular office of the firm and not the market rate? What in the world are you basing this on? Its completely incorrect and also nonsensical. If you think about what you're suggesting for 10 minutes you should be able to figure out why...
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