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3rdGenLawStudent

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About 3rdGenLawStudent

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  1. OLSAS GPA & excluded credits

    I was never in this situation, so my advice is just from my own understanding of how OLSAS treats grades. The short answer is yes, I believe your grades from the first year will be included. Your transcript GPA is calculated for the benefit of your school, so they can determine if you qualify to remain in a program, win an award or grant, etc. Schools may exclude grades from transfers, exchanges or the like because they were not classes taken at the institution, so they count as credits but are not included in the GPA. OLSAS is calculating your GPA for an application. They will include all undergraduate grades from all institutions, because law schools want to see how you did throughout university, not just how you did at your most recent institution. However, I wouldn’t despair if I were you. Many law school applicants have poorer grades in their first year. It’s why many schools also look at B2/L2. They want high performers, but they also look for improvement. If these first year marks drag your overall down, but you performed well in later years, the. You’re in the same boat as many of us who apply and get in to law school. You’ll be fine
  2. Unique Course Load

    As a rule of thumb law schools prefer full course loads, as an indicator you will be able to keep up with the demands of law school. But they wouldn’t discard a file because a student didn’t take a full load, especially in your case, where you’ve worked ahead, graduated early, and done exchanges and certificates et cetera. I don’t think you need to worry about that aspect of your application
  3. Personal statement

    Yes characters are different from words- it counts letters, spaces, and punctuation. Having done mine last year, I can say 2000 characters was about 1 1/4 page single space, and 5000 characters was about 3 pages. Keep it brief- they want to see good, concise writing skills.
  4. Same personal essay for all schools?

    Some schools have different questions, and all have different character limits. I would be shocked if they run them through plagiarism software. I have heard that if a school thinks something is fishy on your PS, they compare your writing style to your LSAT written section to see if it sounds like the same person. When I applied I ordered my statements from shortest to longest, wrote the shorter ones first, and then flushed out certain points/ sections in longer statements. You probably can't write the same for each, but that doesn't mean you can't use the sam skeleton/ model.
  5. They only average your score when they rank the files for review. When they receive applications at the end of November they rank them by GPA and average LSAT, and read them in that order. But once they get to you, they take the highest score
  6. Confused by the OLSAS cGPA conversion chart...

    OLSAS does not convert your average to a GPA. If you have the OLSAS chart, you have to convert each mark you have, for each class, and then average those for your overall GPA. Remember to weight them accordingly. So, for example, let's say one term you take 5 full courses, plus a lab, which counts for half. The calculation would be as follows: Class 1: A- : 3.7 Class 2: B+ : 3.3, Lab: B: 3.0 Class 3: A : 3.9 Class 4: B- : 2.7 Cass 5: B : 3.0 Now, the lab is a half credit, so it's only worth 1.5 points adjusted. Add it all up (18.1) and divide it by 5.5 (total credits taken), and you have an overall GPA of 3.29 for this term. Your letter average would be about a B+, but you don't convert that to 3.3, you have to do all the individual grade/ average calculations. So, while your A average looks like it gives you a 3.7, it's not that simple. This can be frustrating, I sympathize. If my average could have been converted to GPA, I would have had a 3.9. Because of how the 'bucketing' of grades is distributed- and, as you noted, big jumps like the one between 3.7 and 3.3- it worked out to 3.66, 3.7 after 4th year grades. Such is the nature of the beast.
  7. CHANCES? cGPA 3.76, L2 3.95, 164

    Your softs sound fine. I didn't have that many leadership/ mentorship roles, but I worked 3 jobs to support myself through my undergrad and save for law school. Working and maintaining the GPA you have is impressive in its own right
  8. With those stats I'd say you're definitely in at Queens and Western, provided your ECs, PS, and references are good. However, you've got an impressive GPA, and I've see advice on this forum, advising people with high GPAs to try for very high LSATs to put themselves in the running for entrance scholarships. Ultimately, you must decide whether the hassle is worth the potential monies from scholarships.
  9. CHANCES? cGPA 3.76, L2 3.95, 164

    With much lower stats (3.7/3.9/159) I got into everywhere you want to, except Osgoode. Osgoode's holistic review makes it a wild card, but your more impressive stats may push you in
  10. Queen's CGPA or L2/B2 GPA?

    As someone who got in fairly early with less than a 160, I can tell you 157 is a fairly accurate minimum competitive LSAT. Harvey is right, though, they publish a fairly detailed class profile so you can get a sense of what the most recent group has
  11. Large Discrepancy in LSAT Score

    While yes, a first write 165 looks great, law school adcoms will recognize the hard work and dedication required to move yourself from a 155 to a 165. I've heard that smaller improvements, 1-3 points, especially below the 160 level, are less impressive because they wonder how hard you really tried to improve. And decreases are obviously not ideal. But a substantial increases should not negatively impact you
  12. University of Waterloo LSAC GPA Conversion

    I'm a recent UW grad and I think you might be misunderstanding the OLSAS conversion process. OLSAS does not convert your average to a GPA. If you have the OLSAS chart, you have to convert each mark you have, for each class, and then average those for your overall GPA. Remember to weight them accordingly. So, for example, let's say one term you take 5 full courses, plus a lab, which counts for half. The calculation would be as follows: Class 1: 83 % - 3.7 Class 2: 79% - 3.3, Lab: 75%- 3.0 Class 3: 86% - 3.9 Class 4: 72% - 2.7 Cass 5: 75% - 3.0 Now, the lab is a half credit, so it's only worth 1.5 points adjusted. Add it all up (18.1) and divide it by 5.5 (total credits taken), and you have an overall GPA of 3.29 for this term. Your percent average would be about a 78, but you don't convert that to 3.3, you have to do all the individual grade/ average calculations. So, while your 80 average looks like it gives you a 3.7, it's not that simple. So perhaps the reason your LSAC GPA is lower is that your weighted grades come out lower. It is frustrating that sometimes, the way percentage grades are bucketed results in seemingly low GPAs. I had this confusion too. I had an 85 average, which I thought gave me an 3.7, but because of how grades are bucketed, my overall only came out to 3.66. EDIT: Also, US GPAs seem to be a bit different than Ontario ones, since they use a 4.3 scale and Ontario uses 4.0. This is most likely to do with the scale the US is using as opposed to Canada. Unlikely that you can get a standardized board to make an exception to use a different systems calculator
  13. Is this considered special/access applicant

    This sounds like much more serious loss and illness, and I'm sorry for you loss. This does make things murkier in terms of access. I can't offer any guidance from personal experience, but perhaps Starling will offer more insight.
  14. Percentage to GPA (UBC to Ontario grading system)

    It's not a direct conversion from average to GPA If you have the OLSAS chart, you have to convert each mark you have, for each class, and then average those for your overall GPA. Remember to weight them accordingly. So, for example, let's say one term you take 5 full courses, plus a lab, which counts for half. The calculation would be as follows: Class 1: 83 % - 3.7 Class 2: 79% - 3.3, Lab: 75%- 3.0 Class 3: 86% - 3.9 Class 4: 72% - 2.7 Cass 5: 75% - 3.0 Now, the lab is a half credit, so it's only worth 1.5 points adjusted. Add it all up (18.1) and divide it by 5.5 (total credits taken), and you have an overall GPA of 3.29. Your percent average would be about a 78, but you don't convert that to 3.3, you have to do all the individual grade/ average calculations
  15. Is this considered special/access applicant

    My understanding is that the access category is for those who have faced difficulty due to circumstances that would provide a barrier to traditional higher education- economic standing, minority/ immigrant status, disability, etc. However, not all schools have the same categories. Some, such as Windsor and Osgoode, only have General and Indigenous categories, and unless you haven't mentioned your Indigenous status, it does not sound like you qualify. Your circumstances sound more like something to be discussed in a personal statement. Often, people with a blip year in their GPA due to the tragedies you mentioned discuss it in their personal statement. This allows the adcom to look past your stats and, if they feel you've provided a good explanation for why you've learned from/ grown from this experience, they may see your resilience as an asset for a law student. I know Osgoode, for example, has a 2-part Personal Statement. Part A everyone must complete, but Part B can be filled out if you have any circumstances (illness of family issues, or economic disadvantage , etc.) and they use this to aid their holistic review. I would avoid applying in the access category, to be honest. I too had an upsetting diagnosis in my last year of undergrad, but I still applied General, and spoke of the illness in my PS. I thought it unfair to mark myself 'access' since I had in no way faced lifelong barriers to higher education as a result of this illness; it only affected my last term of study. Check each schools requirements, however. I can only speak to those Ontario schools that I researched.

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