lawgic1

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About lawgic1

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  1. well if you eventual goal is to get into law school you'll need a Full bachelors from a recognized university. other than that , its really up to you to pick your path to law school . good luck
  2. repost
  3. Hello, i was at the orientation but can't seem to remember if we buy our books from the normal uni book store or a special one within the faculty. also , when do they issue the book list ? thanks
  4. hey , looks like a great resource! thanks again
  5. on a related note.. do outlining strategies for tests and exams differ between the two legal traditions ? I've seen a few skeletal outlines online and was wondering if they'd be relevant. their are also plenty of books claiming to have solid outlining strategies. i realize that I'm getting ahead of myself , but from what I've gleaned , it seems as though managing your notes is key in law school . thanks again
  6. thanks everyone !
  7. i just assume , given the somewhat significant differences between both common and civil law systems , that certain strategies that might be relevant to common law students wouldn't necessarily apply to civil law students. it has little to do with language as I'm actually an anglophone. i was just searching for a guide that targeted civil law specifically . do you know of any good books ? I'm open to all suggestions , i just figured that the stereotypical recommendations for 1L's may not be as relevant when studying civil law.
  8. hello , does anyone know of ant pre law school tools for civil law students? common law schools have books like "getting to yes" as well as other more specialized books that teach you how to summarize cases and diff test taking strategies. haven't had much luck fining anything thanks
  9. interesting that you mention going from common to civil , as i was considering a similar strategy but the other way around lol . my french comprehension skills are on par with the demands of the program ( according to the french placement test) , but nevertheless , the thought of studying in french as well as participating in french moot courts gives me the chills. in my case it was more of a practical decision that revolved around the beast that is the LSAT. after 2 unsuccessful sits i just had to sit myself down and ask myself if i really wanted to study in english bad enough to want to write the test 1 or 2 more times. finally i just decided to stick to the L.LL for the following reasons 1. ill probably want to practice in QC anyway being a native anglo Quebecer, 2.it didn't make much sense to sit around studying for an entrance exam that wasn't necessary 3. i can tack on the extra JD and maybe find some niche cross border work that would allow me to practice in Ontario afterwards, and finally , the L.LL will probably work wonders for my french skills. people across this forum will tell you its a bad idea, but I've seen a handful of success stories with some friends of mine who went from civil to common law jurisdictions and found a job after having done both degrees. these people found work in family law and business law , so you never no. in any case , ill be starting the L.LL in September ( hoping for the best).
  10. i accepted ottawa a while back but i had gotten into UDM and laval as well
  11. are any of you guys in at other schools?
  12. i second what the commenter above said in my case the decision was really about being comfortable as an anglophone in french program. Ottawa allowed me the best of both worlds in that i can submit assignments in english, and thats a huge advantage. Ottawa is also a vibrant bilingual city and the capital of Canada as well as our legal institutions. That being said , if your perfectly bilingual and don't mind living in a quiet town like Quebec city you'd probably be better off because of the low tuition rates etc... im biased , so i can't really guide you lol , but I'm sure you'll make the right decision. all the best !
  13. hi , so yea it seemed to be the same as u described.( no test option tho) i scored a " mid advanced " without to much trouble , and I've never studied in french . ill probably register for some of the support courses all the same because it can only benefit me.
  14. no you don't have to pay the CAS fee thats usually reserved for people who are planning on applying to law schools through LSAC.