McSweeney

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About McSweeney

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  1. I'm also surprised by the rejection. A strong Sask connection seems to be worth the equivalent of a couple LSAT points, so you must have been right on the border of being accepted or rejected. Re-write and bump up your LSAT even a couple more points and you should be in.
  2. I didn't apply to any special categories, but I did apply as a 2 year student and received a conditional acceptance in February saying that I needed to complete my final semester of my 2nd year. After I sent them my final transcripts, they sent me an official acceptance and repeated the $2,000 minimum scholarship offer. So maybe you're right that my conditional offer changed things. They didn't say specifically what scholarship I received. Actually, I'll just go ahead and paste the exact relevant part of the e-mail:
  3. If you've been accepted, then they should have also told you that you'll receive scholarship money in the acceptance e-mail. That's what happened with me. They said I would get $2,000 minimum but possibly more. I don't know when they'll tell me exactly how much I get. And I agree that it's probably a combination of all factors, same as their criteria for acceptance.
  4. That's actually a mystery. I think a lot of people mistakenly give their GPA out of 4.00 here, but Saskatchewan claims that their 3.38 average is out of 4.30. Still, there isn't usually a big difference between 4.00 and 4.30 anyway because getting an A+ is really damn hard at the university level.
  5. http://explore.usask.ca/programs/colleges/law/index.php Admission Averages Average GPA: 3.38 Average LSAT: 159 I also recorded that 3.5, 165 as the most shocking rejection. Another one was 3.70, 160 with a "medium Sask. connection (I'm guessing it wasn't that strong)." Also have a 3.69, 159 no Sask connection. Those rejected LSATS are at or above Saskatchewan's stated average, with GPAs well above them. I've seen stats far lower than those accepted thanks to strong Sask connections, such as 3.70, 154. Actually I've seen multiple cases of a 154 being accepted if they have a decent GPA and strong Sask connection. It's clearly an important factor.
  6. You guys were probably not accepted already because you lack a Sask. connection, which they place great importance on. I've seen some solid stats rejected in the past few years simply because they didn't have one. As for what the usual accepted stats are: according to their officially stated average it's 159 LSAT and 3.38 GPA on a 4.30 scale, but they have contradicted themselves on that GPA number and also said 3.70. Those numbers also have a significant amount of Sask. connection mixed in there. They seem to be more forgiving of a high GPA and low LSAT than the other way around.
  7. Even if your party was this one, I doubt they'd really care, let alone the freakin Conservative Party, which I'm guessing is the one you served. The paranoia of being associated with Trump is real I see.
  8. Do you have any connection to Saskatchewan? If you do, you have an outside shot of making it in with those numbers. With no Sask. connection, no chance. Are you sure your GPA is 3.25 though? That sounds low for 81.3%. Convert it to Saskatchewan's 4.3 scale. Case in point, this is from Saskatchewan's admissions page: Saskatchewan actually has issues calculating its own GPA apparently, but you should re-check your GPA.
  9. I think a bigger problem than people lying are people who aren't calculating their GPAs correctly, or they unknowingly are giving a GPA on the 4.00 scale when they're actually posting in a school forum that uses 4.50 or something. The LSATs posted here always seem reasonable (unlike Reddit where EVERYBODY scores 170+)
  10. What he said. Saskatchewan values a "Saskatchewan connection" highly, and they show a slight preference for GPA over LSAT. University of Alberta also weighs GPA heavily; there are several people who have been admitted this year with high GPAs and LSATs in the low 150s. Moreover, they are a Last 2 school which works in your favour. University of Alberta hungers for your GPA!
  11. It might be important for scholarship money. I received a conditional offer from University of Saskatchewan, and they told me that I will get a minimum $2,000 in scholarship money, BUT possibly more upon successful completion of my last semester and submission of my final grades.
  12. What can you tell us about your experience? Were you under pressure to make the average grade B even though the majority of papers you graded were crap?
  13. For what it's worth, University of Saskatchewan's online application has a "visible minority" checkbox, not even referring to aboriginal status, since that's a whole separate thing that they require documented proof for. Here's the description of the checkbox: "The 'term visible minority' does not refer to nationality or religion. Persons who identify themselves as a member of a visible minority are non-caucasian in race and/or non-white in color." Although I doubt that checking this box would give one a huge advantage, it probably has to do with Saskatchewan being a candidate for whitest law school in Canada.
  14. He made a good point toward the end when he talked about how top ranked law schools get inundated with black applicants with LSAT scores in the low 150s (ie they have no chance of getting in). If they assume that they can get into the school they want just because they're black, this would hurt their study habits for the LSAT. Reminds me of when I saw a statistic that measured university majors with their median LSAT scores, and at the very bottom was Criminal Justice majors. Just like the good ol' Pre-Law Club extracurricular that will surely get one into University of Toronto ...
  15. Thanks for sharing, that's interesting and helps confirm my own theories as to the importance of the "Saskatchewan connection." I thought that it was borne out of a desire to help retain graduates who will actually want to stick around and practice in the province; I didn't know that the situation was so bad that students weren't even sticking around past first year. Coincidentally, a thread has now been bumped up in the General Discussion forum where a few users are holding Q&As regarding transferring out after first year to a more preferred school (including one who transferred from an "unnamed prairie school" (LOL) to BC).