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bobbyflem

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About bobbyflem

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  1. Lowest LSAT for a realistic shot...

    Thanks! I'll give it a shot and see how it goes once I start focusing more on RC
  2. Lowest LSAT for a realistic shot...

    My worst is definitely RC...but I know that I'll be able to squeeze a good number of points out of LR and LG if I'm diligent and work hard. Right now I'm getting -9 or -10 on the LR section during timed sections. I'm confident that I'll be able to get that number to -4 to -6 per section by Feb. Same goes for LG.
  3. Lowest LSAT for a realistic shot...

    It says on their website that they drop the lowest 25% of your grades.
  4. Lowest LSAT for a realistic shot...

    Thanks for your advice! I'm definitely NOT scoring 150 right now; probably closer to 145. But like you said, I think that with some hard work, 155+ is totally doable by Feb. I'll definitely be using the Dec test as an experience - I was able to write the digital LSAT a few weeks back, so my fees are waived for one of my writings. I'll be applying to USask and UNB; hopefully I get into one of them! Thanks for the encouragement
  5. Hi all, I'm registered to write the LSAT in December (just a couple weeks..ahhh!) and I doubt I'll get a good enough score for admission anywhere (probably a 150 at best). I'm also registered for Feb's writing. My current situation: Currently working on a M.Ed with a FT job. Undergrad B2/L2: 3.8 CGPA: 3.39/4.33 Admissions GPA for UNB (best 75% of classes) is 3.72/4.33. I'm from BC - no Atlantic connection whatsoever aside from a couple friends in NL. What do you think the minimum LSAT score I'll need is for admission to UNB in Sept 2018? Any encouragement is greatly appreciated!
  6. Army Reserves and Law School

    I was in the Army reserves for 3.5 years during my undergrad. I eventually released because it conflicted too much with my schedule. The toughest part will probably be getting your mandatory training out of the way (BMQ, BMQ-L and whatever trades courses you're going to need). They will take up the majority of your summers in law school which may (or may not) affect your chances of landing an articling job right out the door. Take that with a grain of salt, as I'm not in law school right now; still finishing up my undergrad. The training nights are a pretty negligible commitment. They don't require very much time, and as a rule of thumb, you only NEED to show up once per month. Each regiment will have its own rules for attendance as it's up to the discretion of the Commanding Officer; mine was that you had to attend at least 1 Wednesday evening training per month, and 1 weekend training per semester. In the reserves, they will likely want you to be on a weekend BMQ course. This took an enormous toll on my grades. There is always the option to do it during the summer (which, especially if you're in law school, will be the best option). This all being said, the military was a fantastic experience, and I regret absolutely nothing about it. You'll make extremely good friends, and the life skills you'll pick up are invaluable. IMO, mandatory service would do a lot of people these days some good (especially seeing the calibre of people being churned out of high schools these days). Whatever you decide to do, I wish you the best of luck!
  7. Out-of-province law school to practice in BC?

    I don't have anything that screams "special consideration." I served in the army reserves for the first 3.5 years of my degree (recently released) and that took a toll on my grades, but I'm doubtful that it warrants special consideration.
  8. Out-of-province law school to practice in BC?

    Well...maybe in that case, I don't have much of a shot at UBC!
  9. Out-of-province law school to practice in BC?

    I'm pretty sure, that's what the website implies...UVic explicitly says they consider every credit you've attempted (including fails/retakes) whereas UBC doesn't say anything like that
  10. Out-of-province law school to practice in BC?

    I realize that, but even so, my cGPA would be just under 80%. I re-took 3 classes; UVic would consider the grades from both the first time I took the classes and the second grade I got, effectively averaging them and at the same time, using up my drops. UBC (as far as I know) would simply take the most recent grade from the re-takes, and then drop the lowest marks on top of that.
  11. Out-of-province law school to practice in BC?

    Yeah, I did. UBC I have a chance if I can manage 170+ on the LSAT, otherwise, it's a no-go. UVic I have no chance because I have an F and a few C+s on my transcript from my first couple of years. L2 is sitting around 3.75/4.33 which is around 85-86%
  12. Hey everyone; first time poster, long time lurker. I'm looking to apply to law school this coming fall and I'm trying to decide which school I should attend. I'm from BC and I've talked to a number of lawyers here, and the consensus seems to be that it doesn't matter where your degree is from in the long term. Additionally, they agree that you should attend law school in the province in which you intend to practice. My grades for my first couple years of my undergrad were mediocre at best, so that rules out UBC/UVic. TRU is still an option if I decide to stay in BC, but my issue with it is the cost. I'm looking to apply to U of A, U of C and U of S in addition to TRU. This begs the question: How hard/easy is it to attend an out of province school such as U of S, and then come back to BC for summer jobs/articles/career? I grew up in the Lower Mainland, but I'm not dead set on landing a Vancouver job (although it might be nice). I would consider the Kelowna/Kamloops/Prince George markets for jobs. As mentioned above, my issue with TRU is the cost; I could attend U of S and still save around $5-6000 per year including flights home to Vancouver for Christmas/job interviews, etc. What are you thoughts?
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