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barelylegal

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barelylegal last won the day on September 26 2016

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  1. OP mentioned wanting to open up a "civil law business", which I figured meant criminal defence wasn't of interest - perhaps that was an unfair assumption. But yes, from my (admittedly limited) knowledge, a criminal defence practice seems more likely to be sustainable with Legal Aid certificates forming a substantial part.
  2. The above advice is good, so I won't repeat it. I just want to note that your goal here is to open a business, and cater to people who can't (or can barely) afford to pay you. Sounds like a pretty difficult business model to maintain - how do you expect to pay for a physical location, other overhead costs, plus things like bar membership, when your clientele is made up of people who can't afford lawyers? I think your goal is honourable, but I'm not sure it's realistic. To be clear, I'm not trying to dissuade you from law school. Law school can certainly lead you to a fulfilling career, whether you're interested in large law firms or not - what you envision right now just might not be what it looks like. For example, as @Adrian mentioned, if you're able to work somewhere like Legal Aid, you may be able to do the work you want to be doing without needing to open up your own business. Just something to keep in mind in making your decision.
  3. Applying in third year?

    Yes, people do it (myself included), though it's uncommon. Whether it's a "bad idea" depends on your personal circumstances - maturity, experience, commitment, finances, etc. This has definitely been discussed in other threads - fairly extensively, if I recall correctly. You should search around the forum. ETA: I graduated from law school a few years ago now, but I believe I was one of about three people in my class who went to law school after completing three years of undergrad.
  4. Lockstep progression after articling?

    @maximumbob is correct - you start back as an associate likely in August-September, then generally are considered a first year associate until the end of the following calendar year. You might get some kind of very minor salary bump at the new calendar year a few months after you've come back - something like $98k to $100k, for example - but that varies and you're still considered a first year associate.
  5. Given Credit for Work

    As a matter of principle, I have a problem when lawyers don't support students - whether formally (e.g. including their name in a footnote of an article they assisted on) or informally (e.g. telling other people they did well, or in conversation noting that the student did work on the project). That being said, lawyers are busy, and some of the things you've mentioned could be the result of them just not thinking to do what you think is appropriate (rather than a deliberate omission). So, to probe a bit: You say that your work has appeared with another person's name on it. As @wakawaka noted, if you're talking about something like a factum, that's just not in the cards and is an unreasonable expectation. If you're talking about things like blog posts or articles - what are we talking about here? Is it that you hand the lawyer a draft that has both their name and your name on it as authors, and they deliberately remove your name without otherwise noting your contribution? Or do you just give them a plain draft, which they then add their name to? If the latter, it could simply be an oversight that you could be a bit more proactive about avoiding. When I was articling, I'd draft blog posts and feel a bit bad when my name wasn't added as an author - then, I simply started delivering drafts that included my name, and it stayed there. You say that the lawyer "doesn't even bother" to bring you to hearings for which you've drafted materials. But have you asked to go? If you drafted the materials, you know when the hearing is - have you asked to attend, either in advance or by dropping by the lawyer's office the day before? Have you made it known to the lawyer that you're interested in coming along? Yes, it's important for lawyers to help students develop - but it's also important for them to do other things, like serve their clients, which takes up quite a bit of time and energy. Sometimes you need to be proactive if you want these opportunities. Have you been? Your post suggests not.
  6. Should I change my phone number?

    My info is a few years out of date, but my plan used to be that incoming calls from outside my local area were not long distance as long as I was in my local area. So when I was in Kingston with my Kingston area code, I could get calls from Kingston, Toronto, wherever in Canada with no issue, and could make outgoing calls to Kingston numbers with no issue. When I went to Toronto for weekends/interviews/whatever or otherwise was outside my local area, incoming calls from anywhere, including Kingston, were considered long distance. So it's worth considering the back-and-forth you might be doing to Toronto if you want to work there and aren't planning on getting a Canada-wide plan.
  7. Of course it doesn't necessarily mean that. But what do you think it is that we do, in law or just in life? We make inferences of what is happening or will happen based on what has happened in similar past experiences. When I'm advising a client, I look at the facts of their situation and tell them what I think the legal result will be, based on the legal result in prior situations I have seen or know of. It's called precedent, or simply experience. There may very well be unique factors present that suggest something different will happen this time, but it's generally up to the client to tell me enough information that I'm aware of them, not for me to groundlessly identify every possible fact that could hypothetically exist to change the analysis.* As @kiamia noted above, generally, when people ask whether something is a good idea, it's because they're contemplating it. You asked that question, so based on our prior experiences, we reasonably drew the conclusion that you were contemplating it because you gave us no information suggesting otherwise. It's not our responsibility to think of any number of farfetched situations that could apply to you that make this question depart from the norm of all the other similar questions we've seen. You came here asking for help, so it's your job to provide any relevant information. * Obviously it's more nuanced than this. Just go with it.
  8. I'm jumping into this late, but overly academic writing is something I used to struggle with on occasion (and sometimes still do), so thought I'd try to help. The issue seems to be that what you think is writing clearly is actually being overly formal and verbiose. The general advice is that you shouldn't use a long word where a short word would do the job. Same goes with sentence length - fewer words is better than more words. Of course, there are circumstances where that won't or shouldn't apply, but it's a good place to start and you can work up from there. As @Hegdis said, you need to master the basics before you can break the rules. Here are some examples of what I mean: Instead, you could have said something like: See what I mean? Half the length, same idea, no unnecessarily long or formal words, not academic. If I had more time, it could probably be edited down even more than that. Here, you could have just said: "Where did I say I want to write in a 'gimmicky' fashion? If you're referring to when I said [X], that was a joke." Posters are responding the way they are because the tone of your writing suggests that you're trying to sound smart. You very well may be smart, but writing like this makes it seem like you're overly defensive about it and trying to prove yourself. That doesn't really work in a crowd of lawyers. Just say what you want to say.
  9. Articling Jobs 2018

    You may not get formal paperwork for months - there's tons of time. You may not even get a formal contract at all. Don't worry.
  10. How long should a Personal Statement be?

    Found via a simple Google search: http://www.osgoode.yorku.ca/programs/juris-doctor/jd-admissions/application-components/personal-statement/
  11. Tips for getting through

    I don't understand the problem. Applying to school is something you do on your own. Why would the goals of people around you, or your perception of the legitimacy of those goals, have an impact on that?
  12. Walking or cycling to work

    I walk to work, and just keep a collection of shoes in the office to change into from boots in the winter. Will usually do some kind of seasonal rotation, switching stuff out twice a year. Much easier, and much more comfortable walk.
  13. Suits for Women

    Agreed with the above - best to err on the side of more conservative, with black/navy/gray (though some colour in your top under a blazer is fine).
  14. Toronto Articling Recruit 2018-19

    Whether your interviewer will know you got your interview off a waitlist will probably vary by firm. At mine, interviewers just get an interview schedule and the relevant application packages, with no further info about how the person they're interviewing got their interview. Perhaps that differs at other firms, I wouldn't know. Yes, getting an interview off the waitlist means you were lower on their initial priority list than those who got interviews on call day. However, rankings change a ton over the course of interview week and I don't think you can draw any conclusions about your chances of actually getting hired. Think of how many applicants there are - really, how much difference is there on paper between you, potentially top of the wait list, and the last person on the list of who got call day interviews? During interviews, strong candidates flame out, mildly less strong (but still strong) candidates shine, you can't predict how things will go. Personally, I'd feel regret if I passed up an opportunity to fight for a firm I really liked in favour of something that seemed like a safer bet (but could still turn into nothing).
  15. Informational Interview After Call Day

    You can definitely email and ask - I did a couple of informational interviews after call day leading up to interview week when I went through the recruit - but be aware of the LSUC guidelines referenced above and be prepared for people potentially being unable to talk to you. Firms have different policies in response to the LSUC guidelines - some won't let anyone do informational interviews, some will only let lawyers who aren't actually doing interviews answer questions, some will only permit phone conversations instead of face-to-face meetings, some will only allow questions of a certain level of generality to be answered, some will only allow candidates to speak with the student/recruitment director/coordinator, some will have a combination of the above. Regardless, I don't think inquiring would have any negative reflection on you, it's totally common.
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