barelylegal

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barelylegal last won the day on September 26 2016

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  1. https://www.lsac.org/jd/announcements-and-news
  2. Also - the people you'll be meeting with likely are not the people who were on the receiving end of your calls today. At our firm, interview calls are done by the student recruiter/administrator and a team of support staff, not by lawyers who will actually be interviewing. It's likely that the people you meet during your interview won't have any clue about the scheduling process - not sure how other firms operate, but we just get a schedule before interviews telling us who we're interviewing and when.
  3. Cocktail parties are more casual, time-wise. You don't need to stay the whole time, you don't need to show up right on time - just make sure you're at least there long enough to talk to sufficient people / make an impression.
  4. This is my impression as well.
  5. Fairly sure they don't do CMPA work, but can't speak beyond that.
  6. Gowlings, McCarthy's and Lerners do a lot of CMPA work (defending doctors - who have been sued, or are subject to professional discipline, I believe). I believe BLG's health law work is re: hospital administrations.
  7. I believe most do, at least mid-sized and larger. I did the articling recruit a few years ago and my sample size is small (as I only applied to 11 or 12 firms), but of the 6 in-firms I got, 3 or 4 had sent me ITCs (one of which was actually by mail).
  8. I never comment on U of T threads - and, to be honest, I only clicked on this one accidentally - but I do think there's some use to at least knowing admissions standards/criteria early on. Say OP works really hard and does his/her best, but that just isn't up to par for admissions - wouldn't it be better for OP to know that earlier on, and spend time considering other options, than to just continue on thinking law school is in the cards and get blindsided later once undergrad is already done? Sure, OP's specific questions are a bit extreme at this stage, but in a more general sense, I'd think it's beneficial to get enough information to know where you stand in a general sense (i.e. competitive vs. not competitive).
  9. Totally anecdotal, but the people I know who clerked at lower / superior courts subsequently found jobs at smaller boutique firms , while the people I know who clerked at appeal courts are the ones who ended up at full service / larger / more well-known firms. Obviously that doesn't account for interest or indicate causation, but based solely on the people I know, lower court clerkships don't seem to easily lead to Bay St. firm jobs, if that's what you want to stick with. Appeal court clerks seem to be more coveted at that level.
  10. Just jumping in to second the above comments that yes, on coming back to Canada after law school abroad, there often is a timing disconnect between graduating and being able to start articling due to NCA requirements. People spend that time in different ways. For example, in my articling class there was a girl who got her law degree in the UK, then came back and did an LLM in Ontario while writing her NCA exams, and then articled at my firm - I've heard this isn't an uncommon path, though can't point to other examples.
  11. At my firm, when we have files that have some U.S. component and need local counsel, we just retain a lawyer/firm in the relevant location - usually drawing on existing connections to do so. So, in that light, I'm not sure what you're asking. Are you trying to advertise yourself as available for retainer as local counsel in a certain part of the U.S.? Are you asking if Canadian firms will actually hire a U.S. lawyer to work for the firm, specifically for use in cases with U.S. components? Are you asking if there's an equivalent to the "local counsel" requirement across Canadian provinces?
  12. This is a bit of a tough question to answer generally, because court time as a junior associate seems to vary quite significantly by firm, practice area, or even the specific types of files you happen to get on. For example, I, specifically, haven't gotten a whole lot of court time because I've been working on arbitrations and more complex files that haven't required routine motions/appearances; another junior in my practice group has been on more small claims and moderately routine files, and consequently has gotten more experience doing motions and such than I have (not to say I haven't had any court time - I still do the occasional routine motion, and I've done a couple smaller files on my own - it's just less frequent). Juniors in other practice areas within my firm get substantially more court time because they deal with institutional clients that produce a large number of fairly routine files that are easy to let a junior handle - so an associate doing insurance or CMPA, for example, might be off doing discoveries (and undertakings motions) 3 months in, while a commercial associate might need to wait until year 3 or 4, just due to the nature of the files. That being said, I think I mentioned earlier in this thread that one of the big differences I've seen between full service firms and boutiques is how files are staffed, and I think that has a material impact on the types of opportunities available to juniors. From what I've heard, in the litigation group of a full service firm, a single file might have multiple associates on it, and the pipeline of opportunities will favour those higher up in the food chain on the file. At a large boutique like mine, it's rare that a file will have more than one partner and one associate, which means that one associate - even if junior - may get a lot more opportunity to do substantive work, run the file day-to-day, and do the routine appearances or other opportunities that come up. To give a specific example, for my first couple years in practice I was the only associate on a very large arbitration, and as a result got a ton of client contact, a lot of responsibility, and a lot of opportunity to show what I could handle; as a result, I was able to do some of the closing argument, which is something I haven't heard of anyone else at my level getting to do and something I probably wouldn't have had access to had I been a second or third associate down the chain. Though not court time, I also get to be a first point of contact for both clients and opposing counsel, and have a substantial role in the day-to-day management of files - again, because the file is probably staffed with only me and a more senior partner. ETA: I recently heard through a reputable source that at a certain large Bay St. full service firm, even 5th and 6th year associates had never done discoveries before - while not court time, I think that's in the same vein as your question. Not sure if that's the norm, but that wouldn't be the case at a firm like mine.
  13. Applications for 2018 entry haven't opened up yet. Probably July or August, I'd guess? General process-wise, OLSAS is a central portal used to apply to Ontario law schools, but you apply to non-Ontario schools directly/individually. OLSAS has an application deadline in early November (with no acceptance-related benefits to submitting before the deadline); non-Ontario schools may have rolling admissions or their own deadlines, but you'll need to do your own research on that. LSAC isn't used for law school application, just the LSAT. You don't need your LSAT score before applying, but note that different schools have deadlines by which you need to write (i.e. if you're applying for 2018 admission, not all schools will accept a score from a February 2018 writing) - again, you'll want to check out different schools' requirements for that.
  14. Tons of people who go to Queen's are from Toronto and/or end up working in Toronto. Visiting Toronto on weekends is super easy - in addition to buses/trains, it's pretty easy to hitch a ride with another law student driving in (unless things have changed since I was at Queen's, people email out to the listserv if they have space available for a ride). If you have specific questions, feel free to DM me - I went to Queen's, now work in Toronto (and summered and articled in Toronto), and also came into Toronto on numerous weekends during law school for family stuff.
  15. As a former tutor at Queen's, I second this. The tutoring program is really a fantastic resource. There's very little structure, so you can see as much or as little of your tutor as you'd like (subject to schedules/availability), and your tutoring sessions can be in whatever form works. When I was tutoring, I would do one-on-one sessions going over what was learned in class each week, go through past exams and review draft answers, help structure/edit essays. host mini study groups around exam time if multiple people I tutored were friends (or pair up with another tutor for this), or just talk through the stresses of law school... I would see some people every week, some people only a couple times around exam time. It's totally free (the school pays the tutors) and confidential.