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barelylegal

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barelylegal last won the day on September 26 2016

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  1. Competitive moot - not selected: forget about litigation?

    Learning to have an arguably cordial working relationship with someone you despise is a skill very applicable to practice. Who said mooting isn't practical experience?
  2. Competitive moot - not selected: forget about litigation?

    True, but whether someone participating in a clinic actually gets "real litigation experience" can vary pretty wildly depending on the particular student and clinic. I'm speaking on average.
  3. Competitive moot - not selected: forget about litigation?

    Just chiming in that it's not a deal breaker at all. At my firm, moots are considered on par with, if not slightly below, clinics in terms of demonstrating litigation experience/interest. Upper year litigation seminars would probably do the job of conveying interest well enough. Don't sweat it.
  4. Applying in 3rd year worth it?

    I got into law school in my third year of undergrad (not Ottawa Law), went, and haven't regretted it. My undergrad was in social sciences, not in something useful - I'd be shocked if the full four-year degree ever would have gotten me anything more than the three years. I knew I wanted to go to law school, and going a year early saved me a year of tuition and gave me a one-year jump on the job market. It might not be for everyone - some people really might need the additional time to mature or rest or earn money or whatever, everyone is different - but it was the right choice for me.
  5. I believe MAG does do a reception, for what it's worth - they used to, anyway. Yes, employers know finding articles is hard, but they also want a student who actually wants to work for them beyond articling and isn't at clear risk of running off to another city and causing them to waste their investment. Trying to interview in multiple cities, and seeking employers' active assistance in accommodating your attempt to do so, doesn't exactly quell those concerns.
  6. Suits for Women

    I generally deal with my own frizzy hair problems by using a heat styling tool (not everyday, though, and not straightening), but there are options between full heat styling and completely natural (not that completely natural, in styles along the lines @providence noted above, is necessarily problematic). For example, I find that partially straightening my hair, just at the top right around my head/part, cuts down most of the frizz issues, and makes things look much cleaner if I then wear it down or half-back. Some heat damage, but the majority of the hair remains untouched. Alternatively, there are different kinds of treatments available if you're willing to shell out some money / manage the upkeep. I tried a keratin treatment during articling and really liked the smoothing effect, but decided the cost/upkeep weren't worthwhile and didn't keep getting them (though I did stick with using keratin-based products).
  7. Bay street big firm

    Re: the bolded above - yes, but this doesn't mean there's competition between associates, as @maximumbob indicates. There's plenty of work to go around. Whether you make target or not is unaffected by what other people are doing. Whether you perform well is unaffected by what other people are doing - except to the extent that teamwork generally leads to better performance. If a poor performer is let go, it's not because of competition - it's because they're a poor performer.
  8. Articling Advice

    I don't agree with all of the comments in the above post - my experience was completely different. I had an excellent time with my 2L summer employer and likely would have loved articling there, but staying there would have pigeonholed me in a more specific area of law and I just wasn't 100% sure I wanted to commit to that at that point. I had a great relationship with the people I worked with and was upfront with the lawyers there and sought advice from them. They were supportive of my looking for a broader experience (though I didn't ask them for references - I used law school professors and prior employers). That said, I liked them and they liked me - days before articling applications were due, I was told they would be offering me an articling position but understood I intended to go through the recruit, and that I would receive a call from them on call day. I ultimately received and accepted an offer elsewhere, and am still on great terms with the lawyers I worked with. Not every employer will have the same approach, and I recognize that I may have had a particularly positive experience doing this. But, I just wanted to provide an alternate experience to what's described by the above poster. Sure, employers don't want to be fallbacks, but they also want the opportunity to hold onto someone they like. Only you know the vibe of your current workplace and what might be appropriate.
  9. Judgeship - if you aren't a litigator, is it still possible?

    My understanding is that there's no real "rule" barring solicitors from becoming judges, but it's a hell of a lot easier to learn the job if you come in having worked with the Rules of Civil Procedure and practicalities of the court processes. It generally seems that having a stellar reputation as a litigator is one of the more common first steps for becoming a judge.
  10. Not sure about this. Most applications we get for articling positions include reference letters. While they're generally just neutral, occasionally people will include references from, for example, lawyers at our firm who taught them in law school courses - those tend to carry a bit of weight.
  11. 1L Grades and 2L Recruitment Advice

    Just want to comment on this, particularly in light of subsequent advice to focus on, among other things, extracurriculars. You note that you're going to be president of a club and on some committees, but don't give any indication of what they are or if they're at all related to your areas of interest (not that you necessarily should, anonymity and all, but I can only go off of what you say). This isn't like law school applications, where it simply matters that you have extracurriculars. It matters what those extracurriculars are. Firms generally won't place much weight just on the fact that you're president of a club / on committees - they'll care if you're involved in extracurriculars which signal an interest in their area(s) of law. If I'm interviewing for students at my litigation firm, and I see someone is president of the business law or IP law club, it's not going to be a point in their favour - in fact, it may make me question whether they're actually interested in what my firm does. It's a different story if the person is on the moot court committee and president of the litigation society.
  12. Articling Timeline 2019/2020 - Toronto

    https://recruitcdn.viglobalcloud.com/Home.aspx?Site=1
  13. Advice on finishing bachelor's

    Just to throw my experience into the ring... I got into law school after 3 years, happened to have enough credits to graduate with a BA / minor but didn't finish my full BAH degree. No one ever asked about it during school or interviews, I never felt self-conscious or looked down on because of it, never posed any real problem. I did have one single 2L job interview (non-OCI) where I suspect my younger age might have been a consideration, but it didn't affect me in any material way. I'm happy to have gotten a one-year jump on the job market and saved a year of tuition/rent.
  14. Securities law

    I do some securities litigation, but I can't add anything in respect of the solicitor side of things. Not sure if OP is referring to the litigation or solicitor side - I'll check back in if they clarify!
  15. Skipping Articling

    The answer to your question will vary drastically depending on what part of Ontario you're looking at, what kind of law firm, what practice area, etc. You'll need to provide additional detail if you want any useful answers. Also, note that you need to get permission from the Law Society to skip articling - see https://www.lsuc.on.ca/licensingprocess.aspx?id=2147498211#Apply_for_Articling_Exemption_from_the_Experiential_Training_Program
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