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barelylegal

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barelylegal last won the day on September 26 2016

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  1. OSC Interviews

    Unless things have drastically changed, this experience might be based on the specific interviewers or branch this person interviewed for. I (successfully) interviewed for the enforcement branch years ago, and my interview was entirely conversational / resume-based. Zero questions coming anywhere close to the purposes of the Commission, its functions, even what the enforcement branch specifically did.
  2. This experience absolutely varies by firm, and practice area. I'm at a boutique where the stage at which you get that kind of solo experience varies by type of file, how complex or routine it is, whether it's for an institutional client that's more touchy about this kind of thing. I obviously don't know what firm or types of files you're on, but consider that you could be involved in and witnessing advocacy at a higher, more complex level than your friends are. Being on your feet and running things is definitely beneficial, but it's not the only way to learn (though, of course, should be balanced to some extent).
  3. Living with parents during law school?

    True, these things inherently aren't that difficult. However, they can seem more or less overwhelming or challenging depending on how overwhelming or challenging other new things in your life are. Law school is new, stressful, overwhelming and challenging. Articling can be even more new, stressful, overwhelming and challenging. Starting as an associate can be even more new, stressful, overwhelming and challenging. It's generally better to get into new lifestyle habits at less otherwise stressful times - there's a reason a lot of people advise getting into good habits while you're still in law school, as the next steps can be pretty crazy and you don't want to pile all kinds of new and unfamiliar responsibilities/habits on top of the others you'll be carrying. Getting used to things like cooking and cleaning for yourself will be easier in school than it would be if your first exposure is during more stressful periods. Also, the conversation has kind of moved past this point but it's sort of related - I don't understand the idea of not wanting to "burden" yourself with cooking/cleaning/jobs/whatever because doing so could negatively impact your grades. Grades are far from the most important thing in law school. By far the most useful thing I learned in school was effective multitasking - being able to organize and prioritize my various responsibilities (lifestyle responsibilities, jobs, clinics, moots, classes), and get everything done - which helped me learn how to keep my grades up even with all the other responsibilities. This made the transition into articling, and then practice, much more seamless than it otherwise would have been - the learning curve was more substantive than procedural. Not having this kind of experience certainly would have made it harder to adapt to the substantially more overwhelming and competing deadlines and responsibilities in the career stages after school.
  4. Living with parents during law school?

    Just to respond to the bold - there can be a big difference between undergrad and law school. The workload may or may not be different, depending on the individual, but in my experience, the competition and stress and general demands were significantly higher in law school. For some people, those things can contribute to the tension with your family (for example, if it makes you or them more touchy or grouchy, and that can set off more or more heated arguments), or are just harder to manage when compounded with stress, etc. from family tension. I'm speculating now, but things like that could affect your grades, making it harder to get a job with a salary that will eventually help you in moving out. I mean, that stuff is hard for people who don't have family stress compounding it. It might be manageable for some people, but not as a rule.
  5. Living with parents during law school?

    No one has really talked about what living at home would practically mean for OP. Could they actually, practically, succeed as a student while living at home? I have a great relationship with my parents. However, I have an overprotective mother. I briefly (i.e. for about 3 weeks) lived at home when I was between apartments after graduating law school. When I was home, my mother would constantly interrupt my bar exam studying - offering me food, asking if I needed anything from the mall or the grocery store, asking me to try things she was cooking, telling me something funny on the internet for "just a moment". It became unworkable, and I had to leave the house to get anything done. This also turned into a problem because, as part of her overprotective nature, my mother would have a full-blown panic attack if I wasn't back home at what she considered a reasonable time - to the extent that she called the police when I wasn't home at 1:30am on a Friday night and wasn't answering my cell phone (I had, in fact, fallen asleep at a friend's place after bar exam studying). I would have had a very difficult time, both academically and socially, being in law school (or any other school) while living at home. OP, what would living at home actually look like for you? Aside from money considerations, would it materially interfere with your law school success or experience?
  6. legal research outside canada

    US and England have their own CanLII-type websites. US: https://www.law.cornell.edu/ UK: http://www.bailii.org/
  7. Getting ready

    Based on your terminology ("junior in high school", "college"), it's probably worth confirming - are you located in Canada or the U.S.?
  8. Housing

    I think a big thing to keep in mind is that "far" and "close" have different meanings in a university city like Kingston. A lot of people would think that a 5-10 minute drive from campus would sound very close. In Kingston, that's kind of far. Kingston is a large city, and most of it wouldn't be ideal for a student solely for proximity reasons. I agree with @leafs_law that it's better to live closer to downtown than to campus, but with the caveat that I generally wouldn't recommend looking further than a 15-20 minute walk from campus.
  9. Folks Outside the Law

    I have nothing to contribute on this topic, but I'm just curious - if you never articled or practiced, how did you conclude that you didn't feel at home in legal culture?
  10. Where To Live in Toronto

    For that radius, I'd suggest St. Lawrence Market if you want to be east, Bay/Yonge and College if you want to be north, maybe King and Bathurst if you want to go west, that whole "Southcore" area if you want to go south (if I'm defining the area correctly - I mean that little hub of newish condos south of Union Station, near Maple Leaf Square). All are pretty central, usually fairly busy, have lifestyle things in the area, and are safe (though on that last point, I haven't heard anything about safety re: Southcore, but I imagine it's not unsafe given its location). All are ~20 minutes' walking distance from the financial district (maybe 25, depending on your walking speed). Other potential considerations - different areas have their own vibe (for example, King and Bathurst is a bit more trendy/younger, St. Lawrence Market is a bit more historical / has an older crowd overall), PATH access (you can stay underground as far north as Yonge and Dundas, as far east as Yonge, as far south as... Harbourfront now? I'm not sure about that one, but definitely at least to Union Station). From my experience, most places rent approx. a month before occupancy.
  11. Firm Perks

    I believe you're proving my point...
  12. Osgoode vs Queens- Pls Halp

    The factors you've listed seem to be the exact things that have been discussed in the many other threads discussing these schools. You say that you've looked at those other threads, but "haven't really found all the answers that [you're] looking for". Perhaps you would get more concrete responses here if you told us specifically what information you're looking for that you haven't found elsewhere.
  13. NCA students I've interviewed have included a grade conversion/understanding-type document along with their transcript, but one provided by their own school. Perhaps you could contact your school and ask if they have something along those lines?
  14. Firm Perks

    Just to tack onto what's already been said about this - yes, it's beneficial to BD with fellow lawyers around your vintage because they might go in house / turn into clients in a few years. But also, they can be referral sources outside of that. For example, say a big national firm acts for large banks - they're likely unable to act for any of the many people that want to sue a bank (some of whom may be their clients on other matters). So, if one of those aspiring bank-suers either approaches that large firm or is already a client of that large firm, that firm may be in a position to refer the matter to someone else. If you have good relationships with people at that firm, that "someone else" could be you.
  15. Firm Perks

    I'm at one of those firms that has a great associate BD budget/policy, and it's probably my favourite perk. If there's a new or trendy restaurant or bar that's more expensive than I'd pay for on my own, but would be fitting for a meal with a client or referral source, I can go there, on the firm's dime, and use it as an opportunity to catch up / reconnect with a contact (and, by personal policy, I limit my BD to people I actually enjoy spending time with, so an extra perk is a reason to catch up with someone I'd want to see anyway) - I just make a point of talking business for some material portion of the outing. I can also take contacts to events (sports/entertainment events, wine tastings, whatever), with the same rationale. It's a great way to encourage associates to develop business and build profile, which helps the firm in the long run, but it can also be fun and let you enjoy the city. Also, sometimes you have high-worth files/clients and they get you fancy wine for presents. I consider that a perk.

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