barelylegal

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barelylegal last won the day on September 26 2016

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  1. Whether large full-service firms participate in the articling recruit seems to vary by year. When I did the articling recruit a few years back, there were a couple of large firms hiring; I understand that's been less common in the years since. Regardless, generally speaking, there are far fewer large firms participating in the articling recruit than OCIs. However, there tend to be a good number of reputable mid-sized firms participating in the articling recruit - whether they're firms that hired 2L summer students after the normal OCI recruit, or that hire only articling students. Many of these firms have varying degrees of specialization, but they're certainly out there. It just may be less likely that you'll find something full-service, so you should probably think more critically about what it is you're interested in if you haven't done so yet.
  2. Professional Responsibility / Rules / By-laws are all, effectively, one topic. There's no separate section for them - the questions are dispersed throughout the other sections.
  3. Have you checked with UofA to confirm it won't affect anything for them? They may not require people to have full degrees, but did they admit you on the understanding that you would have one? If this change makes your application inaccurate, you should probably notify them. Beyond that, in my experience, employers aren't too concerned with whether you actually have an undergrad degree. However, they will ask for your undergrad transcripts, so the low GPA could be a red flag - particularly considering the relatively low number of law school grades they'll have to consider at that point.
  4. That's not magic - that the STI you contracted on the dance floor.
  5. Have you done much research into what law school / practicing law are like? There are numerous lawyers on the forum (myself included) who I'm sure would be more than happy to give you some insight into what it's like, which could help you get a better idea of if it's going to be for you. I certainly struggled with whether I'd like law / being a lawyer before starting law school - I don't think it's the red flag a previous poster seemed to suggest - and I ended up loving it.
  6. Yonge and Sheppard probably wouldn't be a bad option. Close to the highway, subway proximity. They're trying to turn it into a "downtown north" type of area, the success of which is questionable, but there are lots of restaurants and theatres and grocery stores and generally useful "quality of life" aspects in the area. Not sure if the pricing around there might be a little high, though, with all the new condos.
  7. I guess other people may have different perceptions, but I found that the different 1L subjects were quite different substantively - contracts was very different from torts, for example, let alone constitutional - which is why, when tutoring, I'd come across people who were killing it in criminal but couldn't for the life of them wrap their heads around contracts. I'd think that doing poorly in all of them, without discrimination, probably relates more to form or application than substance.
  8. Based on the extremely limited information you've given, if you're doing poorly across the board, I'd think your problem relates to how you're writing exams rather than substantive understanding. That's good news, because it's something that can definitely be learned - law school exams require a certain kind of structure and application method that you just may not have grasped and need more practice with. Going over your exams with your professors is probably the best way to improve that. With those grades, you're likely going to have a lot of trouble finding a job for your 2L summer. However, if you can bring your grades up substantially and explain that you had a rough start with exams but learned from your mistakes and improved with hard work, I'd think that you'll be okay.
  9. If Phil Lam or Daphne Dean are still in the landlord game, avoid them like the plague. Also, Highpoint isn't great. When I was in one of their houses during undergrad, they double rented it while we were in a bit of a dispute on re-signing the lease - we wanted to re-sign and hadn't given notice of leaving, but there was a difference of opinion on the time requirements and they just rented the place to another group in the middle of it. We ended up having to go to court over it and were able to stay, and the other group got screwed over.
  10. You can also see every user that's online and what topic they're viewing. I feel violated.
  11. Someone privately messaged me with a question that might be useful to others, so I'm posting about it here (generally and anonymously). The question was whether someone looking to get into commercial litigation as a junior lawyer would be disadvantaged in finding a job in the field without much experience/knowledge in the Securities Act, the Competition Act, class actions or commercial arbitration. I don't think this would be much of a disadvantage as a junior. Personally, I know zero about the Competition Act, and just barely above zero about class actions. I know a fair bit about the Securities Act and commercial arbitration just from my own experience thus far, but this stuff is a bit specific and is far from required knowledge. If you need to know about it, you can learn as you go. From my experience, commercial litigation generally is mostly about things like breach of contract issues and shareholder disputes, with stuff like securities and competition and class actions as more niche or specialty areas. I can't imagine a junior would be expected to come in with any working knowledge of these areas (though it could be seen as an unnecessary, but appreciated, asset).
  12. The professional responsibility section covers the main stuff, if I remember correctly, but it's worth reading through the actual rules at least once. They're fairly readable, shouldn't take you too long.
  13. Seconding the above note - coming in as first alternative during OCIs may feel like failure, but it generally means that you did quite well. If you want some tips/practice, your best bet is probably contacting your school's career services office. Most law schools offer interview prep through career services for free. If their resources aren't quite what you're looking for, perhaps they'd have referrals for you.
  14. You need to know zero law before applying to law school - that's what law school is for! General advice is that it's good to do a bit of research into what being a lawyer is actually like before applying, since it's a big investment - you say you think you have the right personality/attitude to be a lawyer, but all different kinds of personalities and attitudes thrive in different areas of law, there's no one type that suggests you'll actually enjoy being a lawyer. But no, you don't need to know anything about law before law school. I don't understand your second question. The practice of law isn't really "about" one specific thing - other than serving your client, I suppose (whether that's a private client, the government, a company, whatever). Different types of law involve different core skills/tasks/goals. Perhaps I can try to give a better answer if you explain your question a bit more.
  15. If you're interested in being a tutor, why not email Helen and ask if your GPA is competitive?