Jump to content

Ptolemy

Members
  • Content count

    1389
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    3

Ptolemy last won the day on November 2 2013

Ptolemy had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

644 Good People

About Ptolemy

  • Rank

Recent Profile Visitors

10719 profile views
  1. How much does being close matter?

    UVic is a no-brainer.
  2. U of Ottawa vs. Western for crim

    Preface: I have no idea what COL or tuition is for either school. Nor do I have any idea what the legal market in ON looks like for criminal lawyers. Consider cost. Criminal law positions for students and junior associates tend to be lower-paid than those in big law.
  3. U of A Vs Dal

    Go to UofA
  4. TRU vs Windsor

    I don't mean to derail this thread, but I feel that I must comment on the idea that schools place students in articling positions. To all 0Ls and current law students, I would warn you that, at the end of the day, you are responsible for finding a job and you shouldn't expect your school--its reputation or career development office--to give you an edge over students from other schools. Employers hire people, not schools. Some law students have nepotism (or a comparable "in" with an employer), good grades or an in-demand background that will make it easier for them to find an articling position. For the rest of us, you need to pound the pavement, abandon any sense of entitlement and really sell yourself to potential employers to find a position.
  5. U Alberta or Osgoode

    The second most important consideration after location is cost. UofA has significantly lower tuition than Osgoode (I don't know how much exactly, so look into it). That makes UofA a better choice if you don't know where you want to live yet. Many 0Ls seem oblivious to the reality that a higher debt load will limit your options in many areas of your life.
  6. Schools good for health law?

    Dalhousie and UofA both have great reputations for Health Law. I'm sure there are other schools with reputable scholarship and decent course selection . Course selction will differ between schools. Does it matter much where you go if you want to practise Health Law? I would be cautious of attending the law schools born within the last 10 years (do they have course selection and professors respected in the area??) Otherwise, it might not matter.
  7. Salary in Edmonton

    I believe a competitive articling salary is around 50k with Law Society and CPLED fees covered, and a competitive salary as a first-year call is around 75k with law society fees and insurance covered. I have no idea what average would be, given that some students and first-year calls might take very low paying positions out of desperation. Also, some associates aren't compensated by a salary at all (eg "eat what you kill").
  8. Do not live in a student residence during law school! I did in 1L at Dal. It was a horrific experience in so many ways. Some particularly memorable ones were the douche-bag 18-year olds thinking it would be hilarious to pull the fire alarm at 3 AM (this happened once or twice a semester) ... then there was the guy next to me who had a subwoofer going in his room ... also, the expensive mandatory meal plans ... and the guy who smoked a joint in the shared bathroom ... and the vomit all over the floors and bathrooms. Please PM me for more if you actually think living in an undergrad residence is a good idea.
  9. Alberta Vs. Dalhousie

    I think 10 or so did when I went to Dal.
  10. JD/MLIS

    All of your questions can be best answered by a search of information on the website and an email to admissions officers. Maybe ask for the contact information for some recent graduates and ask them how they have used their credentials. I think the program is 4 years long. I tend to question the value of the MLIS if you practise law and the value of a JD if you are not practising law. Does someone even need a JD to be a law librarian?
  11. TRU vs SASK

    The consensus among law school graduates is that proximity and cost should be the determinative factors (in that order) when picking a law school. I highly regret going to Dal over a cheaper school closer to my target job market. PM me if you want more details.
  12. TRU vs SASK

    I think Saskatchewan is a no-brainer.
  13. Queen's v.s. Dal

    I think the two schools are comparable when it comes to all the factors you listed. I doubt that Dal can provide you with anything Queen's cannot, so I would pick Queen's if I were you because it is closer to where you are from and where I presume that you want to practise.
  14. Short answer: no. However, UBC's conversion of grades on a 4.0 scale to its percentage system tends to prejudice applicants with marks from schools using a 4.0 system. And some law schools have lower admissions standards for students with some kind of in-province connection (e.g., Saskatchewan, UNB and Dal).
  15. A Change of Heart? Check this out

    I agree with the overall message of Diplock's post, but I'm not so optimistic about an applicant with a 3.4 and a 155 who doesn't qualify as a mature student at many (most?) schools. Accordingly, my advice to the OP would be to prepare to perform better on the LSAT, in addition to applying broadly.
×